Pursue a Nursing Degree

An exceptionally rewarding field, nursing is a career choice that is always in demand. It is one where compassion, empathy, and care are at the front line – you have a passion for the well-being of people who need proper care and treatment. It’s also a career that has a feast of compelling opportunities – you can be a registered nurse (RN), a licensed practical nurse (LPN), a nurse midwife, or specialize in oncology, pediatrics, and more. True, special schooling is require, but if this is your passion, an online nursing degree may be the way to go.

A Popular Career!

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, registered nurses have the highest employment of all healthcare positions. They make up more than 3 million of the 9 million workers in the healthcare industry.

Things to Consider in an Online Nursing School

Apart from the flexibility by attending an online nursing school, here’s a few things to keep in mind when choosing a program:

  • Make sure the state in which you plan to work will accept your online nursing degree and give you a state license.
  • Check to see if the online nursing school is accredited by the either the Accreditation Commission for Education in Nursing or the American Association of Colleges of Nursing. Both of these are recognized by the U.S. Department of Education.
  • Clinical experience is part of every program. Remember to ask about the clinical requirements: Do you need to arrange or will the work be done through the school.

Inside Online Nursing Programs

Choosing an online nursing school is no easy task – and the choice should not be a quick decision. You must first understand the admission process and any prerequisites needed to get admitted to the program. For example, certain courses such as biology, chemistry, and math are essential prerequisites. Thus, if you plan to pursue a nursing degree, you have a variety of different types of programs from which to choose.

Licensed Practical Nursing Programs

These programs give students the necessary tools to work within most healthcare settings. Most programs include a clinical or practical part of the degree and ma require you to complete a certain amount of practice hours in a healthcare setting. You will need to pass a certification test and get licensed from the state to work as an LPN.

Associate’s Degree in Nursing

Often considered the first step into starting your career as a registered nurse (RN), an associate’s degree in nursing will include courses in clinical practice, nursing theory, and lab skills. Coursework will also include social science and liberal arts courses. This degree can usually be completed in 2 to 3 years.

Bachelor of Science Degree in Nursing

If you want to expand your nursing career path, then a bachelor of science degree in nursing may be a good choice. This degree take some 4 years to complete and includes more extensive lab work plus courses in social sciences, critical thinking, and communications.

Master of Science in Nursing

These programs are aimed at RNs who want to move into a specific career path. You will need at least 2 years (more if you go part time) to complete a master of science in nursing but it will be a gateway to such career options as nurse midwives, nurse practitioners, family practice, community public health, and nurse specialists.

Doctorate in Nursing

Many career paths unfold should you want to pursue a doctorate in nursing. This degree is mostly for nurses interested in administration, education, clinical research, or a more specialized focus.

Accelerated Nursing Programs

These programs are for those who already have a college degree and want to move into nursing, either for a bachelor’s or master’s degree. You’ll received the same amount of clinical hours as you would if you enrolled in an entry-level nursing program.

Career Paths in Nursing

Quite simply, a career as a nurse is a career that can make a difference in people’s lives. Nurses help save lives. They have a great deal of compassion and empathy, and they work hard to help improve a patient’s quality of care and quality of life. Below are some nursing opportunities to consider.
 

  • Registered Nurses – In this varied role, RNs assess the condition of a patient, coordinate patient care, provide emotional support to patients their families, help perform diagnostic tests, explain treatment, and much more. Some nurses specialize, such in oncology or pediatrics, while others may work with critical care or genetics. Most RNs are part of a team of doctors and others specialists.
  • Licensed Practical and Licensed Vocational Nurses– LPNs and LVNs are the backbone of basic care. Working under the direction of doctors and RNs, they monitor patient’s health, provide basic comfort to patients, discuss care with the patients, and keep patient records. Their duties may vary depending on the state and where they work.
  • Nurse Anesthetists, Midwives, and Practitioners – These positions, also called advanced registered nurses, give both primary and specialty healthcare. Duties include performing diagnostic tests; creating patient care plans; operating medical equipment; evaluating a patient’s response to treatment; help diagnose health problems; give patients medicine, and more. APRNs may collaborate with doctors or work independently. They also may specialize and conduct research.

Is an Online Nursing Degree PROGRAM FOR YOU?

Are you inspired to help people and help yourself into a promising career? Consider the potential benefits of pursuing an online nursing degree that may help you pursue the nursing job you’ve always wanted.

With online nursing schools, you attend classes on your schedule–a major advantage when you have a job or other responsibilities. You may also become more comfortable using technology in online nursing programs, which is an important skill in the technologically advanced world of nursing. With online nursing programs, you can have the freedom to pursue a degree and manage your coursework around your existing nursing career.

NURSING CAREER PATHS AND POTENTIAL SALARIES

Nursing careers can help you change and save lives. Many people think the only thing they can do with a nursing degree is become a nurse, but there are various options for students who complete a Nursing program. Salary as a Nursing professional is largely decided by your specific job title, your level of education, your experience and your skill. Consider the following careers, with statistics compiled by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics in 2016.

Registered Nurses 

Registered nurses (RNs) provide and coordinate patient care, educate patients and the public about various health conditions, and provide advice and emotional support to patients and their family members.

  • Median Salary: $70,000 per year (i)
  • Job growth through 2026: 15%  (Much faster than average)
  • Typical Entry-level education: Bachelor's Degree

Licensed Practical and Licensed Vocational Nurses 

Licensed practical nurses (LPNs) and licensed vocational nurses (LVNs) provide basic nursing care. They work under the direction of registered nurses and doctors.

  • Median Salary: $45,030 per year (ii)
  • Job growth through 2026: 12%  (Faster than average)
  • Typical Entry-level education: Postsecondary nondegree award

Nurse Anesthetists, Nurse Midwives, and Nurse Practitioners 

Nurse anesthetists, nurse midwives, and nurse practitioners, also referred to as advanced practice registered nurses (APRNs), coordinate patient care and may provide primary and specialty healthcare. The scope of practice varies from state to state.(iii)

  • Median Salary: $110,930 per year 
  • Job growth through 2026: 31%  (Much faster than average)
  • Typical Entry-level education: Master's Degree

(i) bls.gov/ooh/healthcare/registered-nurses.htm | (ii) bls.gov/ooh/healthcare/licensed-practical-and-licensed-vocational-nurses.htm | (iii) bls.gov/ooh/healthcare/nurse-anesthetists-nurse-midwives-and-nurse-practitioners.htm