Accounting vs Finance Degree Programs

Comparing an accounting vs finance degree program may be important. An accounting career may be more than just working as an accountant. You may be interested in things like financial planning. Accounting majors could be very different from finance. Finance majors may be just as alluring to some people.

Finance and accounting are two components of business degrees. Each is a bit different. All are valuable. Each one aims to help a company to run well. Some also have personal finance management focuses.

Accounting may have a very narrow focus. Finance may cover more topics. Many students take some of each of these programs. Consider all of the job opportunities that interest you. Then, consider the types of career goals you may have. Here is a look at the differences in accounting vs finance degree paths. This may help you get to the goals you have.

Accounting Degree Programs

An accounting degree programs aims to focus on math and numbers. It may include areas of financial reporting. It may include risk management through data. Accountants often focus on gathering data and organizing it. Others tend to make decisions about what that data means.

Accounting degrees are typically a foundation for many concentrated careers. Often, they involve analyzing data. They may include using financial info to evaluate a company’s financial health. That may include areas of bookkeeping. They also go further. This includes creating balance sheets. They may also create income statements. It may include cash flow.

You may spend time using past records. You may also use current reports to create this data. Accounting degrees may often focus on creating information vs finance degrees. That info then helps to ensure accountability. They may also influence decisions a company makes.

Many types of accounting degree programs exist. You may want to consider more than one. Some options include these:

  • (BAcc) Bachelor of Accountancy
  • (BA or ACC) Bachelor of Arts in Accounting
  • Bachelor of Science in Accounting

Many may start pursuing work with a bachelor’s degree. You may go further. You may spend several more years learning. Some of the grad program options include these:

  • Master of Accounting (MAcc)
  • Master of Science in Accounting (MSA)

Students may learn the basics of the degree they choose. Then, they may choose a concentration that interests them. They may also choose electives. This may give you more room to expand your degree. You may even take some finance courses.

Finance Degree Programs

A finance degree is significantly different vs an accounting degree. This type of degree typically offers help for those who want to work in a range of fields. That may include banking. It may include consultancy. Finance programs usually focus on making decisions about investments. These professionals use data that may help form decisions. They may help companies to create profit. Many create strategies for growth.

They may also assess info and data. They may determine if funds are being used wisely. And, they may help companies make decisions about what to change. You may spend time creating strategies for building success. Some may use accountancy data to make those decisions.

Finance majors tend to be very specific vs accounting majors. They may focus on investments. This may include stock investing. Others focus on financial analysis for corporations.

There are typically several finance degree program options. Consider a few different ones. Choose that which applies to the work you want to do.

  • (BA/F) Bachelor of Arts in Finance
  • (BSc/F) Bachelor of Science in Finance

You may go on to a grad degree. Many students do this. It helps them focus their education. You may need to do this for some positions. It may provide more advanced education. Some of the grad school options include:

  • (MSF) Master of Science in Finance
  • (M.Fin) Master of Finance
  • (MAF) Master of Applied Finance
  • (MFE) Master of Financial Economics

Accounting vs Finance Degree Programs

Finance vs. accounting degree programs may be very different. Higher education may help you meet your goals in either field. Concentrations matter. Take a look at this chart. It shows some of the differences you may expect. Which degree path is best for you?

ProgramsAccountingFinance
Designed ForStudents who are looking to become accountantsStudents looking to get into the field of finance
CoursesAccounting, Cost Accounting, Accounting Information SystemsIntroduction to Corporate Finance, Investment Analysis and Management, Financial Management
Career Path OptionsCertified Pubic Accountant, Government Accountant, Internal AuditorCredit Analyst, Finance Officer, Financial Advisor, Financial Planner
CertificationsCertified Public Accountant (CPA), Certified Management Accountant (CMA), Certified Internal Auditor (CIA)Certified Financial Analyst (CFA), Certified Financial Services Auditor (CFSA)

Which Degree Program May Be Perfect for You?

There are many options. Finding one perfect for you may be a challenge. You may love math. You may love people. Some in this field may enjoy creating financial goals. Others might like managing finances. Both fields may offer some of the same skills.

You may do well in accounting in some cases. Do you like to work numbers? Do you enjoy spending a lot of time on data? You may want to help companies manage their budget. You may also be interested in tax careers. This field is likely to be very analytical. It’s typically all about gathering data and organizing it. You may do well here if you are a critical thinker. And, you may also do well if you like to solve problems.

You may wish to focus on financing in other cases. You may like to find solutions. Or, you may like to see companies succeed. You may want to work with people more than books. And, you appreciate the math, but may be more focused on results. You might like to plan and create strategies. Or, you may be interested in economics. You may want to work in areas of investment. You may want to help start businesses.

What about your skills?

Accounting degree programs typically focus heavily on math and statistics. You might need to be willing to learn accounting methods. And, you may also need to be interested in following rules for compliance. You may also be the type of person that likes to interpret data. Or, you may learn skills in accounting principles that are complex. You don’t mind a challenge in that way.

The skills you need in finance are usually a bit different vs an accounting degree. You may need more critical thinking skills. You may also have to be able to make decisions. And, you may love to research and communicate with others. Many have theoretical knowledge. They are typically analytical people. You also may need to voice your opinion. Some in this field may teach others. They may offer insight into problems. They may develop strategies by thinking outside of the box.

It’s also important to think about your goals. Choose a career path first. Consider what type of business you want to work in. Think about the day to day work you may do. Accountants spend a lot of time with computer software. They analyze data. Those in finance spend more time with people. They deal with meetings. They may need to use technology to develop insights.

What may you pursue with an accounting degree?

Accounting degree outcomes may be numerous. Many pursue work with a bachelor’s degree. You may want to go further. A grad degree may be important to some people. Some degrees might require a special license or certification. That is true of becoming a certified public accountant. You may need more training to be a chartered accountant.

Are taxes interesting to you? If so, a career in tax is possible. You may need a certification. You may work in tax firms. And, you may also do taxes for companies. Some own private businesses.

International accounting is another area. You may want to help companies grow across borders. You may work in insurance companies. There, you may help with insurance claims. Government agencies hire accountants, too. They typically use them to balance finances. You may do this at a local, state, or federal level.

Your accounting degree may include a focus on working in a business. In this case, you may take sales data and record it. You may use software to manage it. You may track profits. Or, you may track expenses. You may help with ensuring accuracy in a company’s books. This may include balancing financial statements from banks.

What may you pursue with a finance degree?

Many people with a finance degree typically have a concentration. This may include corporate finance. It might be financial regulation. Some may work in areas such as behavioral finance. Financing modeling is likely another area. There may be many others.

Are you interested in helping to create money and build wealth? Finance degrees may focus on the “doing” part of business. Those in this job make decisions. They may also educate those who make decisions.

Most financing undergrad degrees focus on one area. Post grad degrees let students get more focus. They may want to work in banking. Some may work in financial engineering. Still others might focus on financial planning. The choice is yours.

The key is choosing the perfect finance degree. Consider the type of work you plan to do. You may do well in this field when you like creating plans. You may do well if you like to analyze data.

Courses

The courses you take for any program could help you prepare for your future job. There is some overlap in these courses. Here is a look at some of the courses you may take in accounting vs finance degree programs.

Common Accounting Courses

Accounting Information Systems

This is the study of business structure. You may learn how to collect and process data. You may learn about auditing. This course typically aims to focus on creating business reports. These skills help accountants gather data and make it usable.

Principles of Accounting

The principles of accounting tend to focus on several types of rules for accounting. This may include things like cost principle. It may include time period principle. You may learn more advanced concepts in a second course.

Cost Accounting

Cost accounting is a type of managerial accounting. It aims to focus on the cost of producing. Businesses use this info to make decisions. They also use it to determine profits. It may help companies improve costs and manage goals.

Corporate Taxation

This type of course typically aims to teach students about corporate tax. Corporate taxation is usually for federal tax reporting. It often teaches fundamentals. The focus may be on business taxes. Students may learn about the history and laws about taxes.

Common Finance Courses

Financial Statement Analysis

A financial statement analysis course may focus on reading statements. These are business documents. Students may learn to create them as well. It may teach what they are. It also may teach how to use data in decision making. Students may explore a variety of topics related to creating statements. This may include profit and loss.

Financial Markets and Institutions

A Financial Markets and Institutions course aims to teach about financial assets and markets. It often discusses the role of these areas in the economy. Students may learn about what financial markets are. They may explore concepts like levels of interest rates. They may also explore economy related skills.

Risk and Insurance

A course in risk management and insurance like this typically focuses on decision making. Students may learn how to identify risk. They then may learn how to mitigate it. That may be through the use of insurance products. Students may learn how to apply risk to financials. That includes for decision making.

Intermediate Corporate Finance

An intermediate corporate finance course may expand on finance skills. Students may learn topics related to business finance. This may includes using tools to manage this info. Students may learn about making business decisions. They may learn about working capital management. Many may take courses in multinational finance. This course often follows basic or intro programs.

Career Path Options

Degree programs may be important. You may need to know what degree and coursework is best for the career you hope to have. You may want to work in finance careers. And, you may be after a career path in accounting.

Employers may need people in both fields. Managing money and data is not easy to do. Software helps this. Yet, educated pros may make a difference for many companies. Many organizations need these professionals. That includes companies of all sizes. It also includes nonprofit organizations. Some work in government agencies.

Many types of companies may use both of these services. That includes banks. Building companies, insurance companies, and retailers as well. You may work in the public sector. You may work in an investment company.

And, you may use these skills to start your own company. This may take time. It may also help to have a more advanced degree to reach that goal.

Unsure where to start? Consider what type of work interests you. Think about your perfect job. Do some research. What type of education do you need? Which skills are important? Then, consider the details. That includes how much you may make. It also includes the demand for a job like you want.

Take a look at some of the jobs you may have in the United States. The information here comes from the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS).

Accounting Sample Career Paths

With an accounting degree, you may qualify for jobs such as the following.

Accountants

An accountant typically works to prepare financial records. They may work in businesses. Some have their own firm. They gather and manage financial information. This may include verifying accuracy. It may include examining accounting methods. They may work for banks. Some work for tax firms.

2019 Median Pay: $71,550
2019-29 Job Outlook: 4% 

Bookkeeping Clerk

An bookkeeping clerk often works in companies. They provide bookkeeping services. They may also provide auditing services. Some provide basic accounting services. They help to produce financial records. They also verify accuracy in accounting. This includes looking over the financial books. They may help make decisions in financial matters.

2019 Median Pay: $41,230
2019-29 Job Outlook: 6% decline

Tax Examiners and Collectors, and Revenue Agents

Tax Examiners and Collectors, and Revenue Agents typically work for government agencies. They may be tax examiners. Some work as tax collectors. Others may work as revenue agents. They may work to verify tax forms and records. They may also determine taxes owed. And, they might work with individuals and companies to collect taxes. These professionals may work for the United States federal government.

2019 Median Pay: $54,890
2019-29 Job Outlook: 4% decline

Financial Manager

financial manager is typically a  type of financial manager. You may work with direct investment activities. Some may develop investment plans for companies. Some may help to establish financial goals for businesses. They may often create financial reports. They may gather insights and make recommendations based on data. Many also help minimize risks. They may work for banks. Some might work within businesses. Others could work in insurance companies. Investment firms often hire controllers as well.

2019 Median Pay: $129,890
2019-29 Job Outlook: 15%

Top Executive

Top Executive may be a Chief Financial Officer or (CFO). Their job typically focuses on financial strategy planning. They use data from the company’s books to make decisions and may develop financial goals. They may also create policies for reaching those goals. Some create financial strategies. They are an important role in many organizations. That includes smaller companies, too.

2019 Median Pay: $104,690
2019-29 Job Outlook: 4%

Budget Analyst

budget analyst typically help  to organize finances. They could work with public and private companies. They may help create a budget. Or, they may look at existing budgets to improve them. They may also work to pinpoint concerns. They are usually a valuable component of many companies. Some may work in universities. Others might work for nonprofit organizations. Some work in government agencies as well.

2019 Median Pay: $76,540
2019-29 Job Outlook: 3%

Finance Sample Career Paths

Finance careers are numerous. They include these career path options.

Financial Analyst

financial analyst typically gathers information and develops reports. They may often work to create long term goals for companies. Some might work with individuals. They often create direct investment activities. Many spend time working to create financial strategies for people. They analyze trends. Many work in executive positions.,

2019 Median Pay: $81,590
2019-29 Job Outlook: 5%

Financial Advisor

financial advisor typically works with people to manage their finances. Some may help people to plan their financial future. They may help them make investment decisions. They may help with asset management. Some might help with debt management. They may work in the insurance industry as well. Some may have their own business. Others might work in a private organization. Many work in financial investment firms.

2019 Median Pay: $89,850
2019-29 Job Outlook: 4%

Loan Officer

loan officer typically works in banks. Some could work with third party lenders. They usually evaluate loan applications. They may often authorize the lending of money to a person or business. And, they often recommend approval. They may gather data to do this. That includes application info. They may seek out credit scores. Loan officers may work for many types of lenders. This includes banks and credit unions. It may include mortgage companies. Some work in commercial banks.

2019 Median Pay: $63,270
2019-29 Job Outlook: 3%

Securities Officers

securities officer may also be called a financial services agent. These individuals typically work to sell investments. They may work with individuals. Some may work within financial markets. They may deal with commodities. Some might work in financial organizations. Many work in financial investment companies.

2019 Median Pay: $62,270
2019-29 Job Outlook: 4%

Financial Managers

financial manger usually work in investment firms. They may concentrate in stocks and investment strategies. They typically help companies develop financial reports. Also, they might create direct investment goals. Many may develop strategies for building finances for the business. They may work in banks or insurance companies as well.

2019 Median Pay: $129,890
2019-29 Job Outlook: 15%

Certifications

Sometimes, you may benefit from a certification. These show you have specific skills in an area of focus.

Some accounting certificates that may help you include:

  • Certified public bookkeeper
  • (CIA) Certified internal auditor
  • (CPA) Certified public accountant
  • (CMA) Certified management accountant

Some finance specific certificates may help you, such as:

  • (CFF) Certified in financial forensics
  • (CFA) Certified financial analyst
  • (CFE) Certified fraud examiner
  • Certified tax preparer
  • Enrolled agent

This is an offer for educational opportunities that may lead to employment and not an offer or guarantee of employment and that may help prepare students to meet the certification requirements of the field they choose to study. Students should check with the appropriate certifying body to make sure the program they apply to will help meet any certification requirements. Students should also consult with a representative from the school they select to learn more about career opportunities in that field. Program outcomes vary according to each institution’s specific program curriculum.

Business Majors in College

Many business majors in college exist. You may wish to learn to run a business. You may want to learn how to operate a specific area of business. Majoring in business in college is a common path. Some people may minor in this area, too. You may wish to choose an area that appeals to you. Then, work on earning a degree in it.

Business majors may be important to many companies. They may help companies to hire talented people who could help their company grow. You may help in decision making. You may use critical thinking skills to help companies avoid risks. Sometimes the tasks are more specific. You may just manage the money. Others may manage people. Still, others likely focus on products.

It may be hard to make a decision. Consider a few business majors in college. Then, choose which one is most appealing to you. Do this based on the type of work you may do in the field. Many students focus on what they want to do. Do you want to work with people? Do you like to work in sales? You may love math and numbers.

Many options typically exist. Degree programs may be versatile and offer you a way to choose what works for you. Here is a look at some of the types of business majors in college.

Types of Business Degree Programs

What type of degree should you earn? Business degree options are many. The type of degree you earn depends on many things. This typically includes what the employer expects. Others may put more importance on experience. Here is a look at the various options you may wish to choose to pursue.

Associate Degree in Business

An AAS or AS is one option. An associate degree is usually a beginning program. You may earn it in two years. Some may be shorter. Some of these programs may be fully online. Others may be available in community colleges. These typically offer beginning courses. You may take courses that just touch on some topics. Some may be very specific. That means they typically focus just on a specific area. You may be able to perform a specific function of business.

Another reason to earn an associates degree in business could be if you are undecided. You may not know what area of business interests you the most. Some of these degrees may offer a bit of everything. You may learn a bit about many areas of business. This may include accounting. It may include a bit of business law. You may learn leadership skills. You may then find what interests you the most. Some people may go on to earn a bachelor’s degree after earning an AAS. This may allow them to know what area of business is perfect for their needs.

Associates degrees may be shorter. This typically makes them more affordable than a four year program. They may help some students to reduce costs in their education. In some cases, the credits earned may transfer to another school. It may be important to verify this before making that decision. If so, it may help you get your more extensive degree for less.

There are various types of associates degrees in business. Some examples of areas you may wish to explore include these.

  • Introduction to Human Resources
  • Customer Service Skills
  • Intro to Taxation
  • Business Analysis and Intelligence
  • Intro to Finance

You may be able to use this to help you work in administrative positions in companies. Some work in assistant management positions. Others work in sales support positions. Some go on to start their own business. Many may pursue more advanced degrees.

Is an AAS or AS Best?

An applied associate of science degree is a foundation program. It typically covers business principles. It could also help develop entry level skills. An associate of science focuses on general education courses. It may include business admin basis.

Bachelor of Business Administration

You may have more options at this level. That includes a Bachelor of Business Administration. It may also include a Bachelor of Science in Business Administration. Some also may take a Bachelor of Arts in Business Administration.

Many bachelor degrees include general courses. They also may included advanced courses. This may include areas of math or English. These are skills many may need for business and a business major in college. Many offer electives. This lets a student concentrate. It may help them take courses they are interested in. Then, many may have a concentration focus. This may include a specific area of student. It may include business law. For some, it may include operations management. These programs typically take four years to complete.

The combination of these skills may help a person be valuable to a company. They also need soft skills. Many bachelor’s programs help with this. They may teach communication skills. They may teach critical thinking skills. Many may also teach leadership. These are often important in the business environment as well. These often are specific to the area of study. Those in operations or admin positions may benefit from strategic thinking. Others may need strong math skills.

Many bachelor’s degree programs may also offer other opportunities. This may include internships in companies. These may help students gain real world skills. Othersmay  offer case projects. Some may have capstone projects. Others may have apprenticeships.

Students could learn a great deal in a bachelor’s degree. They may use it to explore topics such as:

  • Business Formation
  • Business Law
  • Managing People
  • Business Finance
  • Business Marketing
  • Research and Development

Some may work in business management positions. Others may use their degree to start their own business. Some may go on to pursue more advanced education.

What’s the Difference in BBA, BSBA, and BABA?

A BBA is a broader focus. Classes may include marketing and economics. A BSBA has a more math focused curriculum. A BABA is more liberal arts focused. It may include more human management courses.

Master of Business Administration

A Master of Science in Business Administration is one option. A Master of Arts in Business Administration is another. The key to these business majors in college is that they tend to be very concentrated. Students may learn advanced skills in key areas of focus. Master’s programs tend to take two years to complete. Some are available online.

There are many options. Students may focus on areas such as:

  • Business Law
  • Economics
  • Human Resources
  • Finance

Students may work in areas such as supply chain management. Others may work as financial advisors. Some could also work as a financial analyst or in consulting fields. Others may work in areas of financial development. Others may want to move into related areas. This may include healthcare or product development.

Some students go on. They may earn a doctoral degree. It provides an even higher level of focus. Students may concentrate in this program. They may attend another 18 months to 2 years to complete this advanced education.

Different Types of Business Majors in College

Which business majors in college are perfect for you? A bachelor’s degree is typically the first step. You may be able to go to a business school. You may go to a traditional college with business majors. The decision making process may be hard. Here are some programs to consider. You may be able to get started on this degree right after high school.

Accounting Degree

An accounting degree often applies to many positions. Some may pursue a career as an accountant. These professionals could work in finance fields. They may work in a public or private company. This type of business degree may be a major or minor. Some may take this program as a part of a humane resource degree. Others likely take it with a business administration degree. Grad students may take it as part of a Master of Business Administration (MBA) program. Accounting majors may be very specific. They could be general, too.

Courses:

  • Intermediate Accounting
  • Cost Management
  • Federal Income Tax
  • Auditing
  • Business Law
  • Information Systems
  • General Business Management

Potential Career Paths: Accounting Consultant, Auditor
2019 Median Pay: $71,550
2019-29 Job Outlook: 0.6%
2019-29 Jobs Available: 
1.28 million

Advertising Degree

An advertising degree aims to teach students how to help market and sell products or services. Students may work in public relations. Some may work in advertising or marketing in private firms. In a bachelor’s degree in advertising, students s may develop critical skills. They may need strategic thinking. They could learn about mass communication. Some may learn journalism. You may take this program as part of other business degrees as well. Some students may minor in it. They may major in business law or public relations.

Courses:

  • Media Planning
  • Creative Strategy
  • Research
  • Media Planning
  • Law and ethics
  • Advertising campaigns

Potential Career Paths: Copywriter, Production Coordinator, Creative Director, Marketing Manager
2019 Median Pay: $125,510
2019-29 Job Outlook: 3%
2019-29 Jobs Available: 25,100

Economics Degree

An economics degree may help you take part in the world of finance. Some people work for companies. Others may work for government agencies. They may help with decision making for investments. An economics degree often leads to working as an economist. Some people major in this field. This usually requires at least a bachelor’s degree. A master’s degree is often necessary for many jobs. This field is typically math based. Students may spend time learning about predicting outcomes. They may study business on a global scale.

Courses:

  • Microeconomics
  • Macroeconomics
  • Applied Econometrics
  • Game Theory
  • Principles of Economics
  • Microeconomics

Potential Career Paths: Economist
2019 Median Pay: $105,020
2019-29 Job Outlook: 14%
2019-29 Jobs Available: 20,500

Entrepreneurship Degree

An entrepreneurship degree may be a varied program. It is not just for those who want to start a business. It could also help those who wish to work in business management. Often, it aims to teach about business development. It could help you learn how to start a business. It may focus on growing a company. And, it may bring together many of the business topics in one program. This may include marketing. It may include business law.

Courses:

  • Entrepreneurial Marketing
  • Entrepreneurial Finance
  • Entrepreneurship and the Startup Methods
  • Entrepreneurship and Society

Potential Career Paths: Business Consultant, Recruiter, Management Analyst
2019 Median Pay: $85,260
2019-29 Job Outlook: 11%
2019-29 Jobs Available: 876,300

Finance Degree

Every business may need to manage money. A finance degree could help you learn how. This is a broad degree. Many people may concentrate in it through a master’s program. It typically aims to provide students with financial knowledge in various areas. Some students may focus in investment management. They may help make investment decisions. Others may turn to banking. Corporate financial analysis is likely another area. Global finance may interest some. Risk management is another area. Students interested in finance may have many career path options. Finance majors may range widely.

Courses:

  • Foundations of Managed Care
  • Business Project Management
  • International Healthcare
  • Asset Management
  • Financial accounting
  • Fixed Income Securities
  • Financial Management

Potential Career Paths: Clinical Director, Medical Records Manager, Office Manager
2019 Median Pay: $129,890
2019-29 Job Outlook: 15%
2019-29 Jobs Available: 697,900

Hospitality Management Degree

hospitality management degree is one often focused on teaching people how to help others. Those with this degree often work in hotels. They may work in casino management. Some also may work in food service management. They may learn about helping people to enjoy their experience. Some also may learn marketing. They may learn social media marketing. Many learn operations management. They may learn to run a hotel in many areas.

Courses:

  • Housekeeping Management
  • Hotel Front Office Management
  • Hotel Convention Sales and Services
  • Hospitality and Tourism Law
  • Leadership in Hospitality

Potential Career Paths: Travel Agent, Travel Attendant, Lodging Manager
2019 Median Pay: $54,430
2019-29 Job Outlook: -12%
2019-29 Jobs Available: 57,200

Human Resources Degree

human resources degree is a business degree. Some students may earn a B.A. in it. They may work as human resource professionals. Others may take human resources coursework to work in other business degrees. A B.S. in Human Resource Management is one path. Students may learn how to hire employees. They may learn how to build relationships in teams and may also ensure companies meet ethical requirements. They may use business data and aim to provide education to employees. And, they may help make business decisions.

Courses:

  • Human Resources Management
  • Principles of Management
  • Human Resource Strategy and Development
  • Total Rewards
  • Business Operations

Potential Career Paths: Human Resource Specialist, Human Resource Manager
2019 Median Pay: $116,720
2019-29 Job Outlook: 6%
2019-29 Jobs Available: 165,200

International Business Degree

An international business degree aids in global business development. Students may learn how to market and build business on a global scale. They may learn about management. They may focus on finance. Also, they may learn about growth strategies. Ethics and law are often a component of this program many times. Many students could earn a Master of Science in International Business. Many could also develop analytic degrees. They may learn to make decisions in a business environment. Cultural areas of study may also be important.

Courses:

  • International Finance Management
  • International Marketing
  • Global Supply Chain Strategy
  • Introduction to International Accounting and Finance
  • Managing the Global Enterprise

Potential Career Paths: Management Analyst, Marketing Manager
2019 Median Pay: $85,260
2019-29 Job Outlook: 11%
2019-29 Jobs Available: 876,300

Management Degrees

Management degrees are a foundation. Many other business majors in college include management. Some people may just earn a bachelor’s in management. Others may go on to learn a master’s. Those who take these programs learn to supervise. They may learn how to manage company assets. They may learn to meet growth expectations. Some learn to use business data. This field may be concentrated. Some may manage finance companies. Others may manage manufacturing companies. Many may work as managers. Others work as CEOs or executives. Some students could have a focus in supply chain management.

Courses:

  • Intermediate Accounting
  • Cost Management
  • Federal Income Tax
  • Auditing
  • Human Resources
  • Business Law
  • Business Ethics

Potential Career Paths: Management Analysts, Accounting Consultant, Auditor
2019 Median Pay: $85,260
2019-29 Job Outlook: 11%
2019-29 Jobs Available: 876,300

Marketing Degree

Many companies often need to market. This is a way of telling others what products and services are available. A marketing degree could be very valuable. An associate’s degree in marketing is one option. Many students pursue a bachelor’s or master’s degree. Students may learn professional selling. They may learn marketing research. They may learn to use business data. Many students also learn consumer behavior. They may also learn about social media. They may go on to work in marketing firms. Some may own their own business. Others may work in large companies.

Courses:

  • Introduction to Marketing Management
  • Foundations of Professional Sales
  • Marketing Research
  • Consumer Behavior
  • Marketing Strategies
  • Marketing Methodology

Potential Career Paths: Account Executive, Media Planner, Brand Manager
2019 Median Pay: $135,900
2019-29 Job Outlook: 6%
2019-29 Jobs Available: 314,900

Operations Management Degree

An operations management degree is another business program. Many people may take this program to work as an operations manager. These people could learn how to lead others. They also may oversee operations in companies. This includes the day to day management tasks. It may also include making decisions for the company. They work to manage products and supply chains in some cases. Many may work in manufacturing. Others may work in office settings.

Courses:

  • Systems Innovation
  • Leading the Enterprise
  • Enterprise Planning and Implementation
  • Energy Strategy and Innovation
  • Organizational Leadership
  • Management Information Systems

Potential Career Paths: Compliance Manager, Manufacturing Manager, Office Manager
2019 Median Pay: $72,850
2019-29 Job Outlook: 0.6%
2019-29 Jobs Available: 317,600

Project Management Degree

project management degree aims to help students learn to manage people and projects. This may include learning to manage projects from the conception through completion. Those with this degree may work as a project manager. They may have to learn to work with people. This may include human resource management classes. They may also learn about decision making. They may have to balance project budgets. And, they may have to develop project plans. Many aim to help company leaders make decisions. They also may watch and control outcomes.

Courses:

  • Applying Leadership Principles
  • Operations Management
  • Assessing and Managing Risk
  • Project Management Tools
  • Procurement and Contracting
  • Project Leadership
  • Assessing and Managing Risk

Potential Career Paths: Construction Manager, Operations Manager
2019 Median Pay: $95,260
2019-29 Job Outlook: 8%
2019-29 Jobs Available: 476,700

Public Relations Degree

public relations degree aims to focus on the relationship between a business and the community. Some may work in business. Others may work in government. Students often need a bachelor’s degree to get a job. These degrees sometimes pair with marketing or advertising degrees. Students may learn about media. They often learn about sales language. They may learn about human decision making. And, they may also learn a bit about psychology.

Courses:

  • Public Relations Principles
  • Media Writing
  • Communication Pathways
  • Public Relations Strategies
  • Media Law
  • Theory of Ethics
  • Public Relations Campaigns
  • Persuasion

Potential Career Paths: Marketing Coordinator, Fundraiser, Media Planner
2019 Median Pay: $135,900
2019-29 Job Outlook: 6%
2019-29 Jobs Available: 314,900

Supply Chain Management Degree

Supply chains aim to help products move from manufacturers to warehouses. They then could help to get them to consumers. A supply chain management degree is of growing importance. More business may be  done online. That may make managing these complex systems so important. Those who get this degree may help with that. That may include procurement of products. It may focus on production. In some areas it could focus on distribution or allocation. Many people work in the delivery aspect. They may learn to manage people. Many may work in high-tech surroundings.

Courses:

  • Principles of Management
  • Business Law
  • Financial Accounting
  • Managerial Accounting
  • Organizational Behavior
  • Integrated Project Management
  • Business Modeling
  • Transportation and Logistics Management

Potential Career Paths: Logistics Manager, Transportation Manager, Logistician
2019 Median Pay: $103,320
2019-29 Job Outlook: 0.9%
2019-29 Jobs Available: 132,040

Taxation Degree

taxation degree aims to prepare students to do taxes for individuals. They may also learn to do taxes for businesses. They may learn the current tax code. And, they may also learn accounting skills. Not everyone in taxation has a formal degree. Some may have a certificate. Those with a degree may work in companies. They may provide leadership skills to tax departments. Some own their own business. Others may work within larger tax firms. Some students may also get a finance degree. Some could go on to earn their CPA.

Courses:

  • Tax Research
  • Estate and Gift Taxation
  • Tax Accounting
  • International Taxation
  • Business Law
  • Cost Accounting
  • Finance

Potential Career Paths: Financial Planning Consultant, Certified Public Accountant
2019 Median Pay: $87,850
2019-29 Job Outlook: 4%
2019-29 Jobs Available: 263,000

Direct Entry MSN Programs for Non Nursing Majors Online

direct entry MSN program for non nursing majors online may be available and may be perfect for you. This option may help you pursue a career you love. Using this way could jumpstart your career. This may be  one way to get into that field .

What Is a Direct Entry MSN Program?

A direct entry master’s in nursing (MSN) program is for students with a non nursing degree who would like to pursue a career as a registered nurse (RN) or advanced practice nurse (APRN). A direct entry MSN program may be available for non-nursing majors online. These people may wish to work as a registered nurse (RN). Some may want to work as an advanced practice nurse (APRN). APRNs are those who earned their master’s degree. There  may be a lot of options in this program. See which ones may work for you.

Does an MSN Need a Nursing Degree?

Some schools may require a nursing degree. Many may need an active nursing license. That may not be the case for all programs. Non nursing students may apply. But, all typically need a bachelor’s degree. This may not need to be in nursing.

What You May Learn in an Online Direct Entry MSN Program

Students may learn a great deal in these direct entry MSN programs for non nursing majors online. That could includes gaining clinical experience. A direct entry master may often provide significant concentration. Students may wish to choose mental health. Others may wish to choose gerontology. Many may also learn skills such as these:

  • Health assessments
  • Clinical leadership
  • Psychiatric eval
  • Forensic nursing

Nursing students typically learn a great deal. They may learn how to provide a safe environment. They may have critical thinking skills. And, they may help to hold leadership roles. Many may have good skills to communicate. They lead decision making. They may provide respectful patient care.

Some courses you may take include these:

  • Pathophysiology
  • Microbiology
  • Pharmacology
  • Leadership
  • Clinical experience
  • Disease prevention

Courses are many. Students may choose which interest them. Some may be  set by the program. Others may be electives. There is typically a lot of room for options. Some students may choose courses that interest them. This may be based on the job they hope to have.

How Long Could It Take to Earn My MSN Degree in a Direct Entry Program?

Direct entry MSN programs for non nursing majors online typically vary. Some may take 15 months to complete. Others could take two years. Part time and full time options usually exist. Accelerated MSN programs may be available. Some programs may need 30 credits. Many typically need 70 to 80. Previous education may play a role in what you take.

How Much Does a Direct Entry MSN Online Program for Non Nursing Majors Typically Cost?

Cost may depend on many factors. School tuition costs typically vary from one area to the next. Concentration areas may help individuals to earn more. These may cost more as well. Based on the type you choose. The cost includes many things. That may include tuition. There are typically lab costs and fees. Students may pay more if they live on campus. Others could  complete an online program. These may be more affordable.

Many may qualify for discounts. This may include scholarships and grants. There may be financing options available. More affordable nursing programs may be available. Some students may receive funds from an employer to cover the costs. Financing may help to cover costs. This ranges. Students may wish to talk to financial counselors for some help.

Could I Earn Both a BSN and MSN Degree as Part of This Program?

Some programs may offer a BSN degree program. This may be available after pre-licensure is met. That happens after the curriculum is complete. Other programs typically do not do this. They likely only provide an MSN. That may be available after completing the whole program. Compare schools. Some may allow for BSN and MSN at the same time. It may be possible to find what you need.

How to Check Accreditation for Direct Entry MSN Programs Online

You may gather info about any school. You must know the facts. Look for a program from the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education. This may be CCNE. Another option is the Accreditation Commission for Education in Nursing. Or, ACEN.

What Could I Pursue with a Direct Entry MSN Online Degree?

Students may typically enter a wide range of career paths. Many choose fields that interest them. This may include careers such as these.

You may aim to become a registered nurse. The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics notes the annual median wage for a registered nurse was $73,300 as of May of 2019.

You may work as a nurse practitioner. The 2019 annual median pay for this field is $115,800 per year as noted by the BLS.

Some students may work as a nurse midwife. This is a growing field. The BLS reports it is growing at 45% through 2029. That is much faster than average. The 2019 annual median pay for this field was $115,800 per year. Another career path may typically include a medical and health services manager. Those in this field had a median annual pay of $100,980 in 2019. That’s noted by the BLS.

Online Direct Entry MSN Programs

Take a look at some direct entry MSN programs. These may be available through numerous schools in the U. S. Other options may exist. Choose a program perfect for your needs. Online programs offer flexibility. This is something today’s students may need. Our data comes from the NCES.

1 Azusa Pacific University


Azusa Pacific University typically offers an online program. You may work to become a clinical nurse specialist. This program may teach theory, policy, and bioethics.

Admission Requirements

A grad app is necessary. Students must typically have a bachelor’s degree. It must come from a regionally accredited school. GPA may also be a factor.

Accreditation

WASC Senior College and University Commission

Tuition & Fees

Undergrad: $40,220
Grad: $569 per credit

Financial Aid

% that get financial aid: 98%

Average amount that is awarded: $25,579

Admission Rate

67%

2 Jacksonville State University


Jacksonville State University typically offers a program that includes emergency management. They may also offer a population health nursing program. There is a nursing education track as well.

Admission Requirements

Students typically must complete a bachelor’s degree. An online app is available for this master’s degree.

Accreditation

Southern Association of Colleges and Schools, Commission on College

Tuition & Fees

Undergrad: $20,840
Grad: $800 per credit hour

Financial Aid

% that get financial aid: 95%

Average amount that is awarded: $8,858

Admission Rate

55%

3 Arizona State University


Arizona State University offers a program for grad students. Programs typically include advanced nursing practice. There may be several focuses available. Innovation leadership is one of them.

Admission Requirements

Students must complete an app online. They need to meet the requirements. Letters of recommendation may be necessary. A 3.0 GPA may be needed.

Accreditation

Higher Learning Commission

Tuition & Fees

Undergrad: $29,428
Grad: $23,544

Financial Aid

% that get financial aid: 96%

Average amount that is awarded: $12,898

Admission Rate

86%

4 American Sentinel University


American Sentinel University offers flexible online programs. This typically includes a DNP degree. There are five concentrations for MSN degrees as well. Several learning paths are available.

Admission Requirements

Applicants must meet specific RN education levels. Then, complete the online app. Students with an RN license need to submit info to the school about it.

Accreditation

Distance Education Accrediting Commission, Higher Learning Commission

Tuition & Fees

Undergrad: $10,800
Grad: $6,845

Financial Aid

Students that get financial aid: 133 students

Average amount that is awarded: $2,287

Admission Rate

N/A

5 University of Central Florida


The University of Central Florida offers several MSN programs. This typically includes a nursing and health care simulation program. Another is nurse educator. They may also offer a leadership and management program.

Admission Requirements

Students apply online. Program requirements exist. Students must meet academic minimums.

Accreditation

Southern Association of Colleges and Schools, Commission on Colleges

Tuition & Fees

Undergrad: $22,467
Grad: $1,194 per hour

Financial Aid

% that get financial aid: 92%

Average amount that is awarded: $9,708

Admission Rate

44%

6 University of Florida


MSN students may choose from several programs at the University of Florida. An MSN to DNP program is one option. Online programs may be available for several nursing field degrees.

Admission Requirements

Grad students need to fill out an application online.. Limited spots are available. Students may need letters of recommendation to qualify.

Accreditation

Southern Association of Colleges and Schools, Commission on Colleges

Tuition & Fees

Undergrad: $12,740
Grad: $569 per credit

Financial Aid

% that get financial aid: 92%

Average amount that is awarded: $10,814

Admission Rate

37%

7 Clayton State University


Clayton State University offers a direct access MSN program. This typically includes a family nurse practitioner program. Other focuses may include geriatric and pediatric fields.

Admission Requirements

Prerequisites apply to most course options. There is an online app. Test scores and transcripts are necessary.

Accreditation

Southern Association of Colleges and Schools, Commission on Colleges

Tuition & Fees

Undergrad: $16,260
Grad: $13,885

Financial Aid

% that get financial aid: 88%

Average amount that is awarded: $8,060

Admission Rate

51%

8 Brenau University


Brenau University offers a flexible MSN program. That typically includes a family nurse practitioner program. Leadership and management is another option. You may obtain a Master of Science in Nursing online.

Admission Requirements

Students must meet prerequisites. They apply online. Transcripts are necessary. RNs with a license must provide info on that.

Accreditation

Southern Association of Colleges and Schools, Commission on Colleges

Tuition & Fees

Undergrad: $31,084
Grad: $13,254

Financial Aid

% that get financial aid: 97%

Average amount that is awarded: $20,924

Admission Rate

58%

9 Illinois State University


Illinois State University typically offers an MSN path. This is through the Mennonite College of Nursing. It offers a BSN to DNP program as well.

Admission Requirements

GPA is one component of the app process. Students need letters of recommendation. They need to complete a full grad application.

Accreditation

Higher Learning Commission

Tuition & Fees

Undergrad: $26,356
Grad: $838 per credit hour

Financial Aid

% that get financial aid: 89%

Average amount that is awarded: $9,729

Admission Rate

82%

10 Ball State University


Ball State University offers a Master of Science in Nursing. This includes a nurse educator path. Family nurse practitioner (FNP) is another route. Nurse administrator is a third option.

Admission Requirements

Getting started requires an online app. Students need to meet prerequisite courses. Essays and letters of rec may be required.

Accreditation

Higher Learning Commission

Tuition & Fees

Undergrad: $26,800
Grad: $20,892

Financial Aid

% that get financial aid: 91%

Average amount that is awarded: $11,650

Admission Rate

77%

11 Briar Cliff University


Students may study a nurse practitioner program at Briar Cliff University. This program typically offers a psychiatric mental health nurse practitioner (PMHN).. Adult and gerontology is another option.

Admission Requirements

Applicants apply online. The college of nursing offers limited applicants. Course history and transcripts play a role in this.

Accreditation

Higher Learning Commission

Tuition & Fees

Undergrad: $40,220
Grad: $569 per credit

Financial Aid

% that get financial aid: 72%

Average amount that is awarded: $23,868

Admission Rate

Open

12 Northern Kentucky University


The master’s program at Northern Kentucky University is a fully online program. Part time and full time options may exist. Students in the nursing profession may apply. Concentration in microbiology is an option.

Admission Requirements

Students with a license may apply. Online applications are available. NCLEX-RN recognition is available.

Accreditation

Southern Association of Colleges and Schools, Commission on Colleges

Tuition & Fees

Undergrad: $20,256
Grad: $943 per hour

Financial Aid

% that get financial aid: 99%

Average amount that is awarded: $8,981

Admission Rate

90%

13 Andrews University


The Andrews University School of Nursing offers an online program. This typically includes BSN pre-licensure. A DNP option may be available. There may also an available RN-BSN online program.

Admission Requirements

Students apply online. The nursing school requires prerequisites based on program selection. GPA plays a role.

Accreditation

Higher Learning Commission

Tuition & Fees

Undergrad: $30,158
Grad: $28,164

Financial Aid

% that get financial aid: 99%

Average amount that is awarded: $17,486

Admission Rate

67%

14 Northern Michigan University


In the MSN at Northern Michigan University, students may learn primary care management. Policy and advocacy are also options. An advanced practice nurse program may be available.

Admission Requirements

Students need to apply online. There are several requirements. A current RN license is one requirement. A written description of goals is another.

Accreditation

Higher Learning Commission

Tuition & Fees

Undergrad: $16,751
Grad: $804 per credit

Financial Aid

% that get financial aid: 93%

Average amount that is awarded: $8,499

Admission Rate

66%

15 Minnesota State University Mankato


Consider Minnesota State University Mankato. It typically has a post nursing masters primary care FNP GC. It also offers a Nursing Practice DNP. A baccalaureate path is available.

Admission Requirements

Students may complete a grad app online. Course requirements are necessary. Students may need to obtain letters of recommendation.

Accreditation

Higher Learning Commission

Tuition & Fees

Undergrad: $16,730
Grad: $10,658

Financial Aid

% that get financial aid: 88%

Average amount that is awarded: $5,537

Admission Rate

63%

16 Alcorn State University


Alcorn State University has an MSN degree path. There are typically two options for baccalaureate prepared nurses. The Nurse Educator path is the most common. The second is an FNP program.

Admission Requirements

A formal online app is required. Applicants may need to meet testing levels. Licensing may be required.

Accreditation

Southern Association of Colleges and Schools, Commission on Colleges

Tuition & Fees

Undergrad: $7,290
Grad: $7,290

Financial Aid

% that get financial aid: 88%

Average amount that is awarded: $9,738

Admission Rate

58%

17 Clarkson College


Clarkson College typically offers two MSN programs. There is the RN to MSN and an option to get a Master of Science in Nursing.

Admission Requirements

An online app is available. A minimum 3.0 GPA as well as an Associates Degree as well as other testing is required.

Accreditation

Higher Learning Commission

Tuition & Fees

Undergrad: $14,040
Grad: $621 per credit

Financial Aid

% that get financial aid: 78%

Average amount that is awarded: $4,780

Admission Rate

46%

18 Seton Hall University


Seton Hall University offers several program options. This typically includes a primary care NP. It may also include an acute care NP. This school usually offers a health systems administration route. The pediatric primary care NP is also online.

Admission Requirements

Admission to the program requires an app. It also requires meeting prerequisites. These programs are somewhat limited in availability.

Accreditation

Middle States Commission on Higher Education

Tuition & Fees

Undergrad: $43,780
Grad: $1,354 per credit

Financial Aid

% that get financial aid: 100%

Average amount that is awarded: $25,366

Admission Rate

74%

19 Thomas Edison State College


The Thomas Edison State College MSN degree options are numerous. They typically include a nursing informatics plan. There is also a nursing educator and admin path. Students may need to complete 36 credits. This includes core courses.

Admission Requirements

To apply, students need to have a bachelor’s degree. It must come from an accreditted school. A GPA of 3.0 is also necessary. Other qualifications exist.

Accreditation

Middle States Commission on Higher Education

Tuition & Fees

Undergrad: $9,856
Grad: $668 per credit

Financial Aid

Students that get financial aid: 1,709

Average amount that is awarded: $3,450

Admission Rate

N/A

20 Mercy College


The nursing education path at Mercy College is typically extensive. Nurse midwife is one field. Another is nurse anesthetist. Students may have access to advanced tech. It also has a large simulation lab.

Admission Requirements

A grad school application is necessary. This may include GPA scores and grades from previous classes. Students may need to prove they qualify for the specific grad program.

Accreditation

Middle States Commission on Higher Education

Tuition & Fees

Undergrad: $19,594
Grad: $17,287

Financial Aid

% that get financial aid: 96%

Average amount that is awarded: $14,228

Admission Rate

82%

21 East Carolina University


The Master of Science in Nursing path at East Carolina University is typically an extensive program. Students may have the opportunity to learn patient care approaches. Adult gerontology NPs are one path. Neonatal NPs, nurse midwives, and administers are other options.

Admission Requirements

Students fill out an app online. Students need to apply with credentials. This includes a license for some programs.

Accreditation

Southern Association of Colleges and Schools, Commission on Colleges

Tuition & Fees

Undergrad: $23,515
Grad: $894 per credit

Financial Aid

% that get financial aid: 79%

Average amount that is awarded: $8,149

Admission Rate

79%

22 Bloomsburg University of Pennsylvania


The Bloomsburg University of Pennsylvania typically offers a variety of course options. This includes nurse anesthesia, NP paths, and public health concentration. Programs may be  available for those who are CRNA, CRNP, and CNM license holders.

Admission Requirements

Students complete an online app to apply. They may need transcripts. They may also need GRE or GMAT scores for some programs.

Accreditation

Middle States Commission on Higher Education

Tuition & Fees

Undergrad: $22,782
Grad: $16,726

Financial Aid

% that get financial aid: 90%

Average amount that is awarded: $5,685

Admission Rate

84%

23 Carlow University


Carlow University typically offers a Education and Leadership MSN program. It does not require a GRE or GMAT. Students may complete it in 15 months. This is full time. Coursework covers many topics in community health. Students who wish to be practicing nursing may study part time.

Admission Requirements

An online app is available. Students typically need to verify identity. They may also have to provide transcripts and previous education info.

Accreditation

Middle States Commission on Higher Education

Tuition & Fees

Undergrad: $30,528
Grad: $19,036

Financial Aid

% that get financial aid: 100%

Average amount that is awarded: $21,732

Admission Rate

92%

24 Duquesne University


Duquesne University typically has several path options. This includes forensic nursing. Executive nursing leadership may be another. Family NP paths are available.

Admission Requirements

Students do not need a GRE to get in. This program is flexible for previous experience. Students need to provide transcripts and test scores.

Accreditation

Middle States Commission on Higher Education

Tuition & Fees

Undergrad: $39,992
Grad: $1,509 per credit

Financial Aid

% that get financial aid: 100%

Average amount that is awarded: $23,183

Admission Rate

74%

9 Colleges with No Letters of Recommendation Required

Looking for colleges that don’t require letters of recommendation? In fact, they do exist! There are also grad programs that don’t require letters of recommendation.

WHY DON’T SOME COLLEGES ASK FOR OR REQUIRE LETTERS OF RECOMMENDATION?

Some colleges don’t require letters of recommendation. Because they may assess a student’s potential in different ways. As an adult learner, there may be life experience that is more important to your application. In other words, that means you have the ability to pursue an undergraduate degree even if you have no letters of recommendation.

Do all graduate schools require letters of recommendation?

No, not all graduate schools require letters of recommendation. In fact, all of the schools on this page offer grad programs! In brief, the most common requirements for grad school often include:

  • Bachelor’s degree from an accredited school
  • GRE or GMAT (many schools do waive this)
  • Official transcripts
  • Writing samples or personal statement
  • Resume

1

Southern New Hampshire University

  • Take advantage of some of the nation’s most affordable tuition rates, while earning a degree from a private, nonprofit, NEASC accredited university.
  • Generous transfer policy, accepting up to 90 credits; the university also partners with community colleges for easy transfer..
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2

University of Arizona Global Campus

  • Accredited University offering Associate’s, Bachelor’s and Master’s Degrees
  • Affordable tuition, 5-6 week courses, and various payment options
  • 80+ online programs
Ashford University

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Featured Schools

HOW TO GET LETTERS OF RECOMMENDATION FOR COLLEGE APPLICATION

Getting letters of recommendation may seem hard, especially if you’ve been out of school for a while. Then again, chances are you can still get a great recommendation from many different people. By all means ask! After all, most people like to help. No matter who you ask? First, make it as easy for them as possible. Obviously ask politely. Also give them plenty of time. Then make sure they know the school’s requirements. Lastly, make sure they know your goals. That way they can be sure to highlight your best qualities. With this in mind, check out our list of the people you can ask for a letter of recommendation.

1. YOUR EMPLOYER

With adult learners, how you work is important. Given that, your manager or team leader can speak to your work ethic and problem solving abilities. In addition, they can also explain how well you work with colleagues. If your job is related to the degree you hope to pursue, that’s great.

But don’t worry if your job is in a different field. Because those traits apply to your character and not a specific position. How hard you work matters. Schools look at how adults perform. So they do not rely as much on tests.

2. YOUR COACH

Why your coach? Truly, college admissions boards don’t care about your championship season. But, if you were always motivating your team? Or, if you stayed late to review game tapes? Then that shows dedication. Therefore, you can draw on this to highlight how you will do in school.

Not so focused on grades in high school? In this case, try talking to a coach about why you feel ready for college now. They may be able to help get that across to an admissions counselor. In other words, a coach can show how hard you work. Lastly, a coach can say you are good on a team.

3. YOUR PROFESSOR

Taking a college class or two before starting a full time program? If so, you can focus on doing well and getting to know the teachers. To be sure, a letter of recommendation from a teacher in your area of study can go a long way. Especially, from a teacher who can speak to your commitment in the classroom. To clarify, as an adult, how you do in class makes a difference.

In this case, you can have a peer talk to a peer. Provided that you are doing well of course! With this in mind, focusing on your class work is important. Another key point is building a relationship with your teacher. In summary, taking classes before a full time program can help you. Because you get to demonstrate how you work. And you get to score a good recommendation from the teacher.

DOES COMMON APP ASK FOR LETTERS OF RECOMMENDATION?

Applying to college is stressful enough without managing all the different forms and deadlines. The Common App by all means makes this easier. And more than 800 schools accept it.

In short, the Common App itself does not require letters of recommendation. But, their Requirements Grid will let you know if any individual schools do. In that case, you can pick and choose where to apply.

9 COLLEGES THAT DON’T REQUIRE LETTERS OF RECOMMENDATION

Colleges wanting a letter of recommendation from former teachers is quite common. But they’re not universal. Especially at schools that cater to non traditional students. In summary, life and work experience can matter more. So check out our list of colleges that don’t require letters of recommendation.

1

Southern New Hampshire University

  • Take advantage of some of the nation’s most affordable tuition rates, while earning a degree from a private, nonprofit, NEASC accredited university.
  • Generous transfer policy, accepting up to 90 credits; the university also partners with community colleges for easy transfer..
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2

University of Arizona Global Campus

  • Accredited University offering Associate’s, Bachelor’s and Master’s Degrees
  • Affordable tuition, 5-6 week courses, and various payment options
  • 80+ online programs
Ashford University

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Featured Schools

1

AMERICAN INTERCONTINENTAL UNIVERSITY

ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS: HIGH SCHOOL DIPLOMA OR GED

POPULAR PROGRAMS AT SNHU:

  • Business
  • Criminal Justice
  • IT & Cyber Security 
  • Psychology

ABOUT AIU:

AIU has physical campuses in Houston, Texas, and Atlanta, Georgia. Though, most students attend the online campus. AIU offers resources such as a four person Graduation Team to support online students. Additionally, online students can also take classes 24/7 via the web or the AIU Mobile App.

2

University of Arizona Global Campus

ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS: HIGH SCHOOL DIPLOMA OR GED

Available Programs:

UAGC offers dozens of undergraduate programs that don’t require letters of recommendation. Including:

  • BA in Business Administration
  • AA in Early Childhood Education
  • BS in Information Technology
  • BA in Accounting
  • BA in Psychology

ABOUT UAGC UNIVERSITY:

UAGC is one of the country’s largest online colleges. Even though it has been an online only school since 2016. Though its headquarters are in San Diego, the school traces its origins back to 1893 and the Mt. Clare Academy girls’ boarding school in Iowa.

3

SOUTHERN NEW HAMPSHIRE UNIVERSITY

ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS: HIGH SCHOOL DIPLOMA /GED, TRANSCRIPTS AND APPLICATION

Available Programs:

Southern New Hampshire University also does not require letters of recommendation! Popular programs include:

  • BS Public Health
  • Healthcare Admin w/concentration in Patient Safety & Quality (BS)
  • Criminal Justice w/concentration in Police Administration and Operations (BS)
  • BA Human Services
  • MS Information Tech w/concentration in Healthcare Informatics

ABOUT SNHU:

SNHU was founded in 1932! At that time the school was known as the New Hampshire Accounting and Secretarial School. Their programs trained students for entry-level positions as secretaries, bookkeepers, and junior accountants. Since then, the school expanded. With over 85,000 students, the University strives to make the application process easy.

4

COLORADO TECHNICAL UNIVERSITY

ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS: HIGH SCHOOL DIPLOMA OR GED

Available Programs:

More than 50 career-focused undergrad degree programs are available at CTU, which include:

  • Bachelor of Science in Healthcare Management
  • BS in Healthcare Management – Health Informatics
  • Bachelor of Science in Business Administration – Data Analytics
  • BS in Management
  • Bachelor of Science in Psychology – Organizational Behavior

ABOUT COLORADO TECHNICAL UNIVERSITY:

CTU was founded in 1965 as a vo-tech school for military veterans. In fact, is still frequently ranked among the “Best for Vets” by Military Times magazine. The latest recognition came in 2016. Along with online only degree programs, CTU also offers courses at its main campus. The campus is located in Colorado Springs and in Aurora, a suburb of Denver.

5

GRAND CANYON UNIVERSITY

ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS: HIGH SCHOOL DIPLOMA / GED

Available Programs:

At GCU, there are no letters of recommendation needed when applying to an online degrees. But, that is not the case if you’re interested in applying to their on-campus Honors College. For this process you will need to submit recommendations.

Some undergraduate programs include:

  • Nursing (Registered Nurse – RN to BSN)
  • Bachelor of Science (BS) in Early Childhood Education (BS)
  • BS in Elementary Education
  • Bachelor of Science (BS) in Business for Secondary Education (ITL)
  • Elementary Education / Special Education (Dual Major) (BS)

ABOUT GRAND CANYON UNIVERSITY:

About 29,000 undergraduates attend GCU’s main campus in Phoenix, Arizona. But there are 54,000 thousand more enrolled in an online degree program. This combo makes GCU the country’s largest private Christian university. Also, GCU gained non-profit status in July 2018.

7

STRAYER UNIVERSITY

ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS: HIGH SCHOOL DIPLOMA OR GED, COMPLETED APPLICATION AND VALID GOVERNMENT ISSUED ID

Available Programs:

Check out these online degrees at Strayer University. No letter of recommendation necessary.

  • BS in Accounting
  • BBA or Bachelor of Business Administration
  • Bachelor of Applied Science in Management
  • BS in Criminal Justice
  • Bachelor of Science (BS) in Information Technology

ABOUT STRAYER UNIVERSITY:

Strayer University is an accredited institution with a proud history of 125 years in quality education. Strayer’s bachelor’s degrees can equip you with the skills and the knowledge you’ll need to advance in your career. Earn them online, on campus, or a combination of both. Notably with your student services coach at your side all along the way.

8

GRANTHAM UNIVERSITY

ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS: HIGH SCHOOL DIPLOMA OR GED

Available Programs:

Programs offered at Grantham University that do not require letters of recommendation include:

  • BS in Information Systems Security
  • Criminal Justice Bachelor of Arts
  • BS in Business Administration in Human Resource Management
  • Bachelor of Science in Health Information Management
  • BS in Cyber Security

ABOUT GRANTHAM UNIVERSITY:

Grantham is a for-profit, online-only university with headquarters in Lenexa, Kansas. As of 2017, undergrad enrollment was almost 8,000. It offers remedial services for students who need to get up to speed. They also accept transfer credits, AP class credits, and credit for relevant life experience.

9

PURDUE UNIVERSITY GLOBAL

ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS: HIGH SCHOOL DIPLOMA OR GED

Available Programs:

There are roughly 50 different undergrad degree programs available at Purdue University Global. Significantly none require letters of recommendation including:

  • B.S. in Health Science
  • BS in Business Administration
  • Health Care Administration (BS, MA)
  • Psychology – Addictions (BS)
  • B.S. in Human Services – Youth/Family Services and Administration

ABOUT PURDUE UNIVERSITY GLOBAL:

Purdue University Global, is part of Indiana’s large, public, Purdue University system. While the university system was founded in 1869, Purdue Global emerged in 2018. All programs focus on adult learners and career-oriented programs.

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Vet Techs vs Vet Assistants

What Is the Difference Between a Vet Tech vs a Vet Assistant?

Vet techs and vet assistants may share many responsibilities. They may both work with animals and as an aid to the veterinarians in a practice. It’s not unusual for outsiders to assume that both jobs are similar. But the two positions have different responsibilities and, in turn, a different earning potential.

A vet tech often has more education and professional opportunities than a vet assistant. They might work under the doctor in a research institution, clinic, kennel, or animal hospital. Techs may work with pets, livestock, zoo animals, lab animals, and military animals. A vet assistant may be often limited to administrative daily tasks in local clinics. Assistants may earn more responsibilities as they continue to log professional hours.

Comparing Vet Techs vs Vet Assistants

Here’s a quick breakdown of the two positions in the fields below. Please note that the median pay is based on the national average.

Job TitleJob DescriptionEducation Requirements2019 Median Annual PayNumber  of Jobs in 2019
Vet Techvet tech may perform a variety of medical tests to diagnose and treat animals. They may also provide general animal care.Associate’s degree$35,320/year109,400 
Vet Assistantvet assistant may help vets, scientists, and other veterinary medicine professionals complete a variety of tasks related to the care of animals.High school degree (or equivalent)$28,590/year92,200

Role of Vet Techs vs Vet Assistants

Knowing the roles of vet techs vs. vet assistants may make it easier to decide which one is the perfect path for you. As you read through the expectations, keep in mind how you would respond to each task.

Vet Assistant Duties

A vet assistant may pursue work directly out of high school. Families with cats, farmers with goats, and lab workers with rats will fuel the profession for years to come. Those who attended a program may have a head start, but much of what is learned is often through hands on experience. This is why it’s so important for assistants to dive into a new position.

Each veterinarian may have their own comfort level when it comes to how much they need their assistant to do.

But for the most part, assistants may be asked to perform the following tasks:

  • Provide basic care: This may mean feeding, grooming, bathing, or exercising the animals.
  • Safety checks: A vet assistant may need to keep things safe and clean for the animals, clients, and staff. This may include disinfecting the waiting room or washing surgical instruments.
  • Prep work: The assistant may prepare the room for a variety of medical procedures. They’re also expected to properly store everything away after the vet has finished.
  • Restraint: Assistants may have to restrain difficult or unruly animals. They may need to remain calm and professional under these stressful situations.
  • Admin work: Vet assistants may fill out intake paperwork and file document. They also may set appointments for clients.

Every clinic or hospital may have its own strengths and limitations. They may have to feel comfortable with the physical and emotional demands of a job. Working with unpredictable pets and animals involves plenty of pressure.

In short, this amounts to vet assistants being willing to fill in wherever they may be needed. On one day, they may be  asked to assist a vet when taking blood samples. On the next, they may spend the majority of their time setting up and dismantling surgical rooms. As a vet witnesses an assistant’s commitment to the job, the assistant stands a better chance of moving up.

Vet Tech Duties

Many of the vet tech duties may mirror those of the vet assistant. The duties of each vet tech may vary from one practice to the next.

It may be some combination of the following:

  • Restraint: Vet techs may need to prevent animals from hurting themselves. They may also need to look out for the safety of other people during exams and procedures.
  • Take X-rays: The technician may operate standard X-ray equipment. They may produce clear and readable images for the veterinarian to diagnose their patients.
  • Perform lab tests: Vet techs may run analyses in the lab. They should feel comfortable working with bodily samples taken for testing (e.g., blood, stool, etc.).
  • Monitoring: Hospitalized animals may need consistent monitoring. This way, vets understand how they’re responding to treatment. This means checking vitals, changing bandages, and alerting staff to major changes.
  • Prep work: Vet tech may need to get animals ready for procedures and set up surgical and exam rooms. They should anticipate common problems and work to prevent them whenever possible.
  • Anesthesia: The vet tech may administer anesthesia to animals during surgery. They may also need to track the animal’s response to the drugs.
  • Emergency aid: Technicians may perform emergency first aid to animals. This usually occurs when the veterinarian is unavailable. They may also be asked to come to the vet’s aid when needed.

Vet techs are generally given more job responsibilities. They may need to know how tests are performed and what equipment is needed for each procedure. They should be comfortable working in a lab setting and be able to run tests and analyze results. Also, they may supervise vet assistants and assign tasks. Time management skills may be important for vet techs.

Educational Requirements of Vet Techs vs Vet Assistants

This is by far the most important distinction between the two. A vet assistant may perform some of the same tasks as a vet tech. But the vet tech may have received higher education. A vet assistant might be hired without any kind of formal degree or accreditation. You should know that there are programs for vet assistants though. This may help an assistant become more qualified for a position.

Vet Assistant Education Requirements

A vet assistant may need nothing more than a GED or a high school diploma. An Approved Veterinary Assistant Program may provide an edge though. If the applicant is in a competitive area, this may be enough to set them apart. The program may include instruction on the specialized tasks expected of a vet assistant. It may also require  students to pass an approved credentialing exam. The test is usually designed to show what the student has learned, but it’s more than that. Completing a course proves the person’s passion for the field, and their ability to go above and beyond.

The National Association of Veterinary Technicians in America (NAVTA) created the Approved Veterinary Assistant designation to recognize how assistants contribute to the animal health of their community. The organization’s training program is honored across the United States.

Vet Technician Education Requirements

Unlike veterinary technologists, you may  not need a bachelor’s degree to become a vet technician. However, a vet technician may need to graduate from an accredited program. The American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA) must approve the coursework. Vet techs may attend school from between two and four years. This is considered an associates degree and may be earned through a community college. (By contrast, the vet assistant is qualifying for a certificate or program diploma.)

The actual for registering may depend on the state. Vet techs may have to attend school. But not all vet techs may need to take and pass the Veterinary Technician National Exam (VTNE). You need to check on your state’s requirements when applying for certification. Going through the proper board or agency may ensure you have everything you need to apply. In some cases, you may need to be licensed or certified, while in others you may just need to register.

Costs of a Vet Assistant Program

As mentioned, a vet assistant may be hired with nothing more than a high school diploma. For this reason, the cost of a vet assistant program is relatively reasonable. This is especially true if you may be getting through an online platform. The number of hours you may need to complete the course may be as low as 100 and as high as 240. Working online may give you the chance to make your own schedule too. This perk may come in handy for those with demanding responsibilities.

Costs of a Vet Technician Degree Program

A vet technician may need the proper education to earn their degree in the field. But the actual costs may vary widely, depending on the program a person selects. Shopping around and checking the reputation of each curriculum may go a long way. Check with different veterinarians in the area about which schools may get preferential treatment. This may help you decide if the costs of the degree are worth the rewards.

Is There an Alternative Route I Could Take to Become a Vet Tech?

It depends on the state that you’re hoping to work in. Alaska, California, and Wisconsin may allow you to sit for the Veterinary Technician National Examination. This may be without having completed the designated coursework required in 47 other states. The vet tech must may need to meet a number of requirements to qualify though. You must provide proof by way of documentation of the veterinarians that you’ve worked with. You’ll also need to show that you have 20 hours worth of class work. This may be obtained through a state approved program.

Salary

The Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) compares the job outlook for vet techs and vet assistants. Officials do this against a variety of other potential career paths. The goal is to give you an idea of what you may expect after graduating and jumpstarting your career.

There is some good news on this front. Both fields are predicted to grow at nearly the same rate until 2029. At 16%, the need for these jobs is increasing at a much faster rate than many other career choices. Job stability is huge for applicants everywhere. Investing in either position may inspire more confidence in people.

You may see this reflected in the higher earning potential of vet techs. Their median annual salary was about $7,000 more per year than a vet assistant. At a median annual salary of $35,320 per year vs. $28,590 for the year of 2019, the pay off in education is clear. The bump in salary may make it easier to repay education costs.

Job Outlook

Regardless of the path chosen though, both professions may have opportunities. Assistants might become certified in operating equipment and veterinary technology. Vet techs may take more classes in any given specialty (e.g., surgical procedures, nutrition, etc). Vet assistants may begin right out of high school before deciding that they want to advance to a vet tech. A vet techs might choose to go onto to be a vet.

As you can see the vet assistant and vet tech may share duties. But the veterinary career positions are different. You should choose between the two based on how much you want to make and how much you’re willing to invest in a vet tech program or the veterinary field. While a vet tech may spend more, they’ll also make more. Or you may choose to start as a part-time assistant at a veterinary hospital or veterinary practice and receive as much on-the-job training as possible. Check your state’s requirements to find out more about what you may expect.

Colleges with Rolling Admissions

Applying to colleges with rolling admissions may make your life easier by reducing your stress of making specific deadlines. Here, we’ve gathered some schools with rolling admissions so you don’t have to do the work of searching for colleges without application deadlines.

7 COLLEGES WITH ROLLING ADMISSIONS POLICIES

Students who have missed traditional admissions deadlines wonder if it’s too late for them to begin their college education. However, some colleges and universities, like online schools, accept applications year-round. While it might be too late to apply to certain colleges, others may welcome your application.

Colleges with rolling admissions policies don’t typically have a hard deadline once or twice a year. These universities usually accept applications until the program is filled. Or, alternatively, these schools typically start new programs every month or every other month.

Of course, admissions policies are subject to change and individual programs at a school may have admissions deadlines that vary from the general policy. Be sure to check with each school for up to date and specific requirements.

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DID YOU KNOW?
May 1 is sometimes referred to as National College Decision Day, because it’s the traditional deadline for deciding which school to enroll in.

COLLEGES WITH ROLLING TRANSFER ADMISSIONS

Hoping to finish earning your degree at a different university from the one you started at? A change of plans can happen, but it doesn’t have to stop your education journey. Some schools may accept transfer applications year-round, on a rolling basis, so you don’t have to stress about meeting certain deadlines.

Check with the college you’re interested in to learn if they have a rolling transfer admissions policy.

3 CONSIDERATIONS FOR APPLYING TO SCHOOLS WITH ROLLING ADMISSIONS

It can be a challenge to get all your ducks in a row before applying to college. Students may miss deadlines or decide to change paths at the last minute. In these cases, finding a college with rolling admissions just might help you make the perfect decision for you!

Rolling admissions means colleges evaluate, and potentially accept, applications as they receive them. (That’s different from colleges who make admissions decisions AFTER they’ve received all applications.) Rolling admissions could work in your favor or against you.

For instance, your school or program of choice could fill up before you have a chance to apply. However, many colleges with rolling admissions offer multiple start dates throughout the year so even if a program is filled for one start date, you don’t have to wait long for another course or program to begin.

Learn more about applying to schools with rolling admissions, with the three tips listed below.

1. PAY ATTENTION TO PRIORITY DEADLINES

Just because a school offers rolling admissions doesn’t mean you should necessarily wait until the last minute before applying.

Try to get your application in before, or soon after, the priority deadline listed by your prospective school. Colleges still accepting applications after that point may not have many spots left!

2. WATCH FOR OTHER DEADLINES

Colleges and universities may not just have admissions deadlines; they can also have deadlines to apply for housing, financial aid, potential merit scholarships, and others.

Some academic programs may also have their own deadlines, separate from the school’s general admissions policy.

3. DON’T JUST CONSIDER THE ROLLING ADMISSIONS DEADLINE

Look for the school that feels like a perfect fit for you. Consider your prospective major, whether you want to study online or on campus, and what potential student clubs and activities you may want to get involved in.

Hopefully, you’ll find a school that both suits your admissions timeline and offers what you’re looking for in terms of a higher education partner.

FIND COLLEGES WITH ROLLING ADMISSIONS

Click on any of the sponsored listings on this page to contact the school or schools you’re interested in.

Or fill out the form on this page to get matched with colleges and universities that may be your ideal fit!

Nursing Degree Levels

Nurses typically get to help patients feel well. They often provide patients with clear communication as they prepare for medical procedures. Skilled nurses may help calm nervous patients and their families. Yet the role of a “nurse” may mean many things. Nurses and nursing professionals have many different degree levels and career paths to consider. Here are some of the certificates, diplomas, and degrees that may all lead to a nursing career.

Certificate or Diploma

A CNA, or Certified Nursing Assistant is one nursing degree level and may be the first step in a nursing career path. CNAs typically have basic patient care skills. This certificate or diploma aims to trains someone on how to provide basic care for patients. CNAs may often provide help with activities of daily living. They may transport patients and clean areas where medical care is given.

Who is it for?

CNA diplomas and certificates may work well for people who need to jumpstart a career in nursing care. It typically requires no degree. Nursing assistants may start with just a high school diploma and certification program completion.

Length of Time

CNA programs are typically available in community colleges and technical schools, and some high schools offer these education programs. It may take  between four and 12 weeks to complete. Many programs require at least 75 hours of classroom instruction and clinical education.

What could you pursue with this certificate?

CNAs may work in a number of fields. Some typical roles and responsibilities include:

  • Working in senior care centers
  • Cleaning and bathing patients
  • Helping with toileting, dressing, and other activities of daily living
  • Positioning and transferring patients who are confined to wheelchairs or beds
  • Measuring vitals
  • Helping with feeding and meals for patients
  • Recording health concerns
  • Reporting health needs to nurses or doctors
  • Dispensing medication

What could you earn?

The US Bureau of Labor Statistics indicates the median annual pay for nursing assistants in 2019 was $29,640. Those who were in the bottom 10 percent earned less than $21,960. Those in the top 90 percent earned over $40,620

LPN/LVN Certificate or Diploma

LPN or Licensed Practical Nurse is another nursing degree level and is a certificate level available to nursing professionals. It may also be called a Licensed Vocational Nurse (LVN), but refers to the same basic certificate. LPNs and LVNs typically work in healthcare settings, including residential care facilities, hospitals, and doctor’s offices.

Who is it for?

LPN/LVN programs are typically for those who want to kickstart a career as a nurse, but want to move beyond the nursing assistant role. A practical nursing certificate could opens the door to more patient care roles.

Length of Time

To become an LPN or LVN, you must complete a state approved nursing program. While each state varies, many of these programs require one year to complete.

What could you do with this certificate?

LPNs and LVNs work in many settings. They may be asked to: 

  • Monitor patients and take vital signs
  • Give basic patient care
  • Change bandages
  • Discuss care with patients
  • Listen to patient needs and concerns
  • Keep patient records
  • Keep patients comfortable
  • Help with activities of daily living
  • Report to registered nurses and doctors

What could you earn?

The Bureau of Labor Statistics indicates the median annual wage for LPNs and LVNs in 2019 was $47,480. The top 90 percent earned over $63,360, while the lowest 10 percent earned less than $34,560.

Associates Degree in Nursing

The first level of degree typically available for nursing is an Associate Degree in Nursing. An ADN typically opens the door to become a Registered Nurse.

Who is it for?

Students who wish to work as a Registered Nurse (RN) and who want to launch their careers could consider an Associates Degree in Nursing.

Length of Time

An ADN program generally takes approximately two years to complete.

What could you do with this certificate?

Students who earn an ADN may be able to take the Registered Nurse examination to pursue a career as an RN. The ADN coursework typically opens the door to entry level nursing positions. These nurses may:

  • Assess the condition of patients and observe their medical condition
  • Record medical histories and symptoms
  • Administer treatments and medications
  • Create care plans for patients
  • Operate medical equipment
  • Collaborate with doctors for patient care
  • Help patients understand home care
  • Perform and analyze diagnostic tests
  • Help with direct patient care under the oversight of a doctor

RNs typically work in hospitals, long term care facilities, medical offices, and other locations where skilled nurses are needed.

What could you earn?

The median annual wage for registered nurses according to the BLS is $73,300. RNs with an associate’s degree tend to be on the lower end of the pay scale. The BLS indicates the lowest 10 percent of wage earners in this field earned less than $52,080 per year. Those in the highest 90th percentile earned over $111,220, but those tend to be RNs with additional training beyond the ADN.

Bachelor of Science in Nursing

A Bachelor of Science in Nursing, or BSN, is the next level of degree for RNs. There are several routes to take to earn a BSN. Some nursing students may start their education with this goal, earning a traditional BSN degree as their first degree. Others may start as an LPN, then pursue an LPN-to-BSN program. Others may become an RN first, then pursue an RN-to-BSN program. Finally, some may get BSN as a second degree after attaining a degree in another field first.

After finishing the coursework for a BSN degree, students may need to take and pass the NCLEX-RN examination. This is typically the final step in attaining RN licensure and starting a nursing practice.

Who is it typically for?

Nurses who are looking to enhance their careers could earn a BSN for higher earning potential and leadership roles. Nurses with a BSN and RN licensure are often the ones considered for administrative or teaching roles.

Length of Time

A BSN typically takes four years to complete. Nurses who already have an ADN may add an additional two years of education to complete their bachelor’s degree.

What could you do with this certificate?

With a Bachelor of Science in Nursing, you may be able to perform all of the tasks of an RN. In addition, you may be considered for:

  • Nursing administration roles
  • Roles in hospitals where a BSN is required
  • Teaching positions
  • Nursing consulting positions
  • Nursing research positions

What could you earn?

The BLS does not break down income differences between nurses with associate’s degrees and bachelor’s degrees. The annual median wage for all RNs is $73,300. Nurses who have a bachelor’s degree are more likely to be in the highest 90th percentile, which has an average wage of $111,220.

Master of Science in Nursing

A Master of Science in Nursing (MSN) is a degree that typically lands between a BSN and a Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP). Many MSN students focus on a clinical concentration area, such as pediatrics or women’s health. Graduates of these nursing programs may work as an advanced practice registered nurses, or APRNs.

Who is it for?

The MSN program may be a stepping off point on the path to a doctor of nursing degree.

Length of Time

It typically takes two to three years to complete a master’s degree in nursing. This is in addition to the bachelor’s level education and clinical experience.

What could you do with this certificate?

An MSN is necessary for careers as:

  • Nurse practitioners
  • Certified Registered Nurse anesthetists
  • Nurse educator
  • Clinical nurse specialist
  • Certified nurse midwife

What could you earn?

The pay of a nurse with an MSN depends largely on where they are employed. According to the BLS, the annual median wage for nurse practitioners, nurse midwives, and nurse anesthetists in 2019 was $115,800. Those in the top 90th percentile earned over $184,180, and those in the lowest 10th percentile earned $82,460.

Joint Master’s Degree in Nursing

Some schools may offer a joint master’s degree in nursing programs that pair an MSN with a master’s degree in another field, such as business or health administration. Nurses who are interested in administrative roles rather than clinical roles may find this path helpful.

Who is it for?

Nurses who want to work in policy making, community health groups, administration, or management may wish to consider a joint master’s degree in nursing program. It may save time, as some courses may overlap, while helping the nurse earn more than one credential.

Length of Time

Joint master’s degree programs may take two to three years to complete.

What could you do with this certificate?

The doors opened to a nurse with a dual master’s degree depend on the second degree earned. Some options include:

  • MSN/MHA: Director of Nursing
  • MSN/MBA: Chief Nursing Officer
  • MSN/MBA: VP of Nursing
  • MSN/MPH: Manager in Community Health Organization

What could you earn?

The income possible with a dual master’s degree in nursing depends on the role the nurse fills. According to the BLS, those who get jobs as medical and health services managers earn a median annual wage of $100,980 a year in 2019. Those in the top 90th percentile earned an average of $189,000. Those in the lowest 10 percent earned less than $58,820.

Doctoral Degree in Nursing

The highest level of degree possible in nursing is a doctoral degree in nursing. A Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) is considered a terminal degree  in the field of nursing. Doctoral degrees are the  most advanced degrees available in the nursing field.

Who is it for?

A doctoral degree in nursing is for those who may want to earn a terminal degree in the field. Advanced practice nurses often choose this degree to open the many doors for their careers. It may work well for nurses who wish to practice fairly independently or who may want to concentrate in a field like midwifery or anesthetics.

Length of Time

A DNP program typically takes between three and six years of nursing school study, depending on the level of education the nurse currently has. A BSN-to-DNP program may take longer than an MSN-to-DNP program.

What could you do with this certificate?

DNP degree holders may serve as nurse practitioners. They may perform many of the roles a doctor would perform, but  typically serve under a doctor. They may also serve as clinical nurse specialists.

What could you earn?

The BLS indicates nurse practitioners earn a median annual wage of $115,800.Practitioners that hold a doctoral level degree are more likely to be in the top 90th percentile, which earned over $184,180 in 2019. Those employed as nurse anesthetists earned the highest average of $174,790. Hospital settings had the highest annual median wages, with $122,420 in 2019.

Nursing Education Degree Levels and Career Paths

Nursing is typically a varied career that has many different levels. Often, nurses may start their careers with just certification, then advance through the different levels of education as they are also working. Here is a typical career path for a nurse who starts at the beginning and works through to the terminal degree:

Career Paths for Certificate Programs

Certified Nursing Assistant

  • $29,640 median annual wage in 2019 as per BLS.
  • Many start with a high school diploma and state approved certification program.
  • Certs may be completed in dual enrollment in high school.

Career Paths for Licensed Practical Nurse (LPN) or Licensed Vocational Nurse (LVN)

  • $47,480 annual median wage in 2019 as per BLS.
  • Many have a high school degree and a certification program.
  • Certs typically take one year to complete and require a nursing exam.

Career Paths for Associate’s Degree Programs

ADN Registered Nurse

  • $52,080 for the lowest ten percent in 2019 as per BLS.
  • Requires an associate’s degree
  • Many may earn the degree in two years

Career Paths for Bachelor’s Degree Programs

BSN Registered Nurse

  • $73,300 median annual pay in 2019 as per BLS.
  • Requires a Bachelor of Science
  • Many typically take four years to complete

Health Services Managers

  • $100,980 median annual wage in 2019 as per BLS.
  • Requires a BSN or similar degree
  • Many typically take four years to complete and require work experience in healthcare

Career Paths for Master’s Degree Programs

Nurse Midwife

  • $105,030 median annual wage in 2019 as per BLS.
  • Requires an MSN minimal degree
  • Many may complete with two to three years of graduate level education

Nurse Practitioner

  • $109,820 median annual wage in 2019 as per BLS.
  • Requires an MSN degree
  • Many may complete with 2 to 3 years of graduate education

Nurse Anesthetists

  • $174,790 median annual wage in 2019 as per BLS.
  • Requires MSN degree
  • Many may complete with 2 to 3 years additional education

Career Paths for Doctoral Level Programs

Nurse Practitioner

  • $184,180 for the highest ten percent in 2019 as per BLS.
  • Requires a DNP for this level of pay
  • Many may complete with 3 to 6 years of doctoral study

Vet Tech Career Guide

What is a Vet Tech?

A vet tech is credentialed professional has basic medical knowledge and clinical skills that apply to animal care. Typically, they may work along side a veterinarian in animal hospitals and vet clinics. Tasks may include lab tests, assess animal health, help during procedures, and perform animal well check exams. The career of a vet tech could give the chance to care for animals daily. If you love animals and want to see them live happy and healthy lives, but do not want to pursue a veterinary degree, then veterinary technician education may be the perfect fit. Here’s a closer look at this veterinary medicine career field and what it takes to pursue a career as a qualified vet tech.

Vet Tech Duties and Responsibilities

A veterinary technician’s primary job generally is helping a vet care for animals. This includes helping animals live healthy lives and protecting the happiness of an animal. Vet techs could be thought of as nurses in a veterinary setting. The duties and responsibilities a vet tech has may depend on the type of practice where the tech works. Their education allows them to do many jobs in a vet’s office, outside of prescribing medicine, diagnosing a condition, and doing surgeries.

Some of the specific jobs that may fall on the vet tech’s shoulders at a vet’s office include:

  • Administering animal’s medications or vaccines
  • Administering treatments in the vet clinic
  • Prepping animals for surgical procedures the vet performs
  • Evaluating the health of an animal through wellness checks
  • Holding animals down during exams or treatments
  • Educating owners on what to do at home to care for an animal
  • Performing routine, non medical care tasks, like trimming toenails or cleaning ears
  • Observing animals for signs of health needs
  • Performing x rays and other diagnostic tests
  • Helping vets and vet scientists with research in the field
  • Charting health histories for animals
  • Providing assistance during surgery or procedures
  • Giving animals anesthesia
  • Offering emergency first aid in urgent care situations
  • Surgical nursing care for vets

Veterinary technicians also generally work with a wide range of animals. In a standard vet’s office, they may typically see cats and dogs and similar small animal pets. However, in an exotic vet’s office, they may see birds, reptiles, and rodents. And, in a farm vet’s office, they may work on the farm with horses, cows, goats, and other farm animals. The work of a vet tech could be quite varied.

Veterinary technicians may also work in lab settings. When animals are used to test medications and products, they require humane handling and care. They may also need careful observation. Vet techs might do both. Their knowledge of animal health and physiology combined with their passion for animals may make them a good fit for this role.

Vet Tech Skills and Competencies

Veterinary technicians need to have a caring demeanor and enjoy working with animals. They must be able to handle animals carefully and treat them in a humane manner. They may also need to have a good bedside manner to help animal owners, especially during times when animals are in distress or facing serious medical issues. Some specific skills that help vet techs succeed may include

Good Communication Skills

Vet techs may need to be able to share their knowledge with animal owners and their coworkers. This requires good communication skills, especially when taking medical knowledge and sharing it with non medical people like owners. Vet techs also need to be able to communicate with vets, being able to respond quickly when the doctor needs something during a procedure.

Empathetic Nature

Pet owners are quite connected to their pets. They often think of them as family. Vet techs must understand this and be able to offer empathy to owners who are in distress because their pet is sick or in pain.

Physical Stamina

The job of a vet tech can be physically demanding. This job requires you to stay on your feet most of the day. You may need to lift and move heavy animals. You must be able to give the animals in your care your undivided attention throughout the day. Vet techs also risk injury on the job. Animals are unpredictable. Techs may get bitten or scratched. Those working with large animals and in equine vets can get kicked. Physical stamina can help you recover from these injuries more quickly.

Dexterity

As a vet tech, you will be asked to handle animals and medical equipment, often at the same time. This can be tricky. Having good dexterity is helpful.

Attention to Details

In any medical setting, including veterinary work, missing details can be a life or death situation. Techs generally working in laboratory animal settings must carefully evaluate the animals in their care. Maintaining accurate records and reporting issues or illness are critical to caring for animals. Vet techs must be detail oriented to do their jobs well.

Technical and Medical Skills

A veterinary technician’s job is a medical job, and this means they will need to be comfortable working with medical equipment, delivering medications, measuring samples, and using diagnostic equipment. They have to be comfortable administering injections or drawing blood. Learning how to use medical equipment quickly in the field is also important.

Emotional Resiliency

Some of the work of a vet tech can be emotionally difficult. Vet techs may need to administer euthanasia for a sick pet. They may witness and document animal abuse. These emotionally draining tasks require resiliency.

Vet Tech Salary and Job Outlook

Many students often start their career in the vet world with veterinary technician certificate. It could launch a future career in animal care or be the only career someone chooses, depending on their goals. Some vet techs may go on to become veterinary scientists or doctors. According to the US Bureau of Labor Statistics, the median annual pay for vet techs in 2019 was $35,320 per year. That was an median pay of $16.98 per hour.

Vet techs who were working as health techs earned a median annual wage of $44,380. Those who were working in the education world, such as working in colleges and professional schools, earned an median annual wage of $40,990. The  employment rate for vet techs according to the BLS is estimated to grow 19% growth from 2018 to 2028, which is much faster than average for other careers.

Education and Certification

If a career as a veterinary technician seems like a good fit for your skills, education is the starting point. This career requires post secondary education. In many states, it also requires certification and credentialing examination.

What Groups Oversee a Veterinary Technology Program?

Vet techs need to be properly certified for their jobs. Several groups assist in this certification. The Committee on Veterinary Technician Education and Activities, which is part of the American Veterinary Medical Association, is one of these. Vet techs must be certified. The certification exam comes from the American Association of Veterinary State Boards (AAVSB).

Education for Vet Techs

The first step in jumpstarting a career as a vet tech is getting the education. The CVTEA/AVMA is the organization that accredits vet tech programs. Look for a program that carries this accreditation.

The base degree for a vet tech is a two year associate’s degree. To prepare for this, consider taking biology and similar science courses in high school. Strong math skills are also helpful. If you’re considering a career as a vet technologist instead of a vet tech, you may need a four year bachelor’s degree. Regardless of whether you choose a four year or two year program, you may study many aspects of animal care. Expect to learn:

  • How to administer anesthesia
  • Biochemistry for animals
  • Nursing care for animals
  • Pathology for vets
  • Pharmaceuticals
  • Anatomy and physiology for animals
  • Surgical care and nursing for animals
  • Common animal diseases

In addition to the in classroom, vet techs may receive clinical or on the job training. Some of the work these pros perform can’t be taught in a classroom setting, but requires hands on instruction. The AVMA requires internship or hands on clinical experience as part of their certified program. Depending on the school and the state, this may be called:

  • Internship
  • Externship
  • Preceptorship
  • Practicum

Regardless of the title, the goal is generally the same. These programs aim to give students the chance to practice what they’ve learned in the classroom under the supervision  of a trained tech or licensed veterinarian.

Vet Tech Certification

After completing a degree program and internship, you may need to be certified or credentialed as a vet tech. The rules for certs vary by state. Many states require their vet techs to take a credentialing exam. A common credentialing exam is the Veterinary Technician National Examination (VTNE). This exam takes four hours to complete. It covers 200 multiple choice questions. These questions cover the following areas of knowledge:

  • Anesthesia
  • Radiography and ultrasound
  • Pharmacy
  • Dentistry
  • Laboratory
  • Animal nursing
  • Surgical prep and assisting

To prepare, students could purchase a practice exam from the American Association of Veterinary State Boards. Before taking the exam, always consult your state’s vet tech credentialing rules. Upon passing the vet tech exam, you may receive your credentials as a vet tech. This makes it possible to start applying for work in the field and pursuing your career.

Similar Roles

A vet tech is similar to a few other roles. They vary based on income and job responsibilities. Comparing the differences could help you make a career choice for your needs.

Vet Assistant Vs. Vet Tech

A vet assistant is someone who works with a vet but may have less formal education in the field. They may earn a cert in vet assisting, or they may learn their skills on the job. Because they are not formally trained, these individuals don’t typically handle direct animal care. They may help with holding animals for procedures, but their primary jobs are clerical and maintenance.

Vet assistants may handle scheduling and bill collection. They may feed and exercise animals and prep and maintain equipment. They also may clean the vet’s office. Vet assistants and vet techs are regulated by the states where they work. The American Veterinary Medical Association offers a state-by-state comparison chart that shows the duties each type of worker can perform.

According to the BLS, a vet assistant earns a median annual salary  of $28,590 per year. Like vet techs, those working on college campuses may earn the highest median annual wage. Like the vet tech, jobs as vet assistants have expected growth, with a 16% increase expected by 2029.

Veterinary Technologist Vs. Vet Technician

“Vet tech” typically refers to the role of a vet technician. A vet technologist is a different role, but with a similar name so they are sometimes confused. Vet techs typically have a two year associate degree. Vet technologists typically have a four year bachelor’s degree. The credentials are similar, and technologists may not have a specific credential depending on the state. It is the additional education that sets them apart.

Vet techs and vet technologists may perform similar duties. The additional education of the technologist may open the door to pursuing roles with a higher potential salary or leadership positions. It may also provide the perfect foundation for a career in a lab setting instead of a vet’s office. The BLS indicates that technologists earn $44,380 as the median annual wage in 2019.

Online Nursing Degree for Non Nurses

Did you know if you already have a degree in another field you can still make a change and go to nursing school to get a degree in nursing? With many online nursing degree programs specifically targeting non nurses, students may have many options available. Keep in mind that many nursing programs, including online nursing degree programs, will require clinical hours or a practicum that is completed in a medical setting. Here’s what you need to know about how non nurses can pursue a career as a nurse by earning an online nursing degree for non nurses.

What is a Registered Nurse?

A Registered Nurse is a nursing professional who has completed a prescribed course in nursing and successfully passed the state’s required nursing examinations. For those who are non nurses, not currently working in nursing or who do not have a nursing degree, earning an RN certification or an online nursing degree could be a smart job move.

CNA Certificate or Diploma

One possible path toward pursing a nursing career is earning a CNA certificate. This does not give you the credentials for an RN degree, but may allow  jumpstart your career in the medical field while pursuing additional education for an RN.

What Does a CNA Do?

CNAs typically perform basic medical care and help with keeping medical offices running. They cannot prescribe medicine or perform medical procedures. They may be asked to:

  • Assist with medical procedures
  • Change or apply bandages
  • Prepare rooms and supplies
  • Clean rooms and linens
  • Assist patients with activities of daily living
  • Take and record vitals
  • Document care given to patients

How to Become a CNA

To pursue a career as a CNA, you must complete a training program approved in your state. High schools, tech schools, hospitals, and community colleges commonly offer these programs. You generally don’t need any previous training to enter a CNA program. Some CNA training programs may be available online, but all will have a hands on component that must be completed in person.

Who is it designed for?

A CNA certificate or diploma is perfect for someone who wants to transition to nursing from a non nursing background. The training aims to provide a foundation in nursing and medical care, and it could open the door to pursuing work in the field. Many may use this as a starting point to further education as they pursue RN degree.

How long could it take?

Training for a CNA certificate or diploma may take just a few weeks. One program run by the American Red Cross typically takes four to eight weeks to complete.

Income Potential for CNA

The Bureau of Labor Statistics indicates an median annual salary for CNAs and orderlies in 2019 was $29,660.

LPN/LVN Certificate or Diploma

A Licensed Practical Nurse (LPN) or Licensed Vocational Nurse (LVN) is the next step up on the nursing career ladder. This is still not a registered nurse position, but it could assist in jumpstarting your career.

What Does an LPN/LVN Do?

LPNs and LVNs work in healthcare settings to assist doctors and perform some of the roles of a nurse. This may include:

  • Keeping patient records
  • Reporting patient needs to RNs or doctors
  • Caring for patient needs
  • Helping with activities of daily living, like bathing or dressing
  • Feeding patients
  • Basic patient care, like catheter placement or bandage care
  • Discussing healthcare with patients and their families

How to Become an LPN/LVN

The training for an LPN or LVN involves completing an appropriate course or program. These are commonly found in technical schools or community college settings. Some will have online classes available, but hands on training in person is required. After finishing the program, new nurses must take the National Council of State Boards of Nursing examination (NCLEX-PN). The National Council Licensure Examination is required in all states for new nurses.

Who is it designed for?

People who want to practice as nurses, not simply assist in a medical setting, but want to launch their career could benefit from LPN and LVN training. For many non nurses, this is a first or second step on the path to an RN degree. It may provide higher earning potential and more graduate employment options than a CNA.

How long could it take?

The LPN or LVN training program typically takes about one year to complete. Nurses may choose certification in a concentration, which could add additional time to their training.

Income Potential for LPN/LVN Nurses

The BLS reports a median annual wage of $47,480 for LPN and LVN professionals in 2019.

Associates Degree in Nursing

The first actual degree for a nurse is an Associate Degree in Nursing, or ADN. With an ADN, a nurse may be eligible to take the certification tests for RN licensure.

What does an ADN-RN Do?

A registered nurse with an ADN degree could pursue work in a hospital or clinical setting. They are often responsible for:

  • Assessing the condition of a patient
  • Recording health histories and medical care
  • Giving medication
  • Giving medical treatments
  • Provide acute care to patients
  • Consulting with doctors and lead nurses about patient care
  • Helping patients understand their home care plans
  • Using medical equipment to take care of patients

How to Become an ADN-RN

To pursue a career as an RN with an associate’s degree, you must find a college that offers an ADN program. Choose an accredited school that is accredited by the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education (CCNE). Your coursework may be available through online programs or on campus, but all RNs must have clinical hours before they are eligible to sit for their RN license exam. After completing their nursing education, students must pass the requirements for licensure. These vary by state, but usually include:

  • Criminal background check
  • Clinical experiences
  • State board requirements
  • NCLEX-RN examination

Who is it for?

Someone who has no background in nursing but want to pursue a  career as an RN should consider an ADN-RN program. It could be one of the ways to earn your credentials as an RN.

How long could it take?

Completing the ADN-RN program typically takes approximately two years.

Income Potential for ADN-RN Degree Holders

The BLS does not break down income potential for RNs based on degree. The median annual pay for RNs in 2019 was $73,300.

Bachelor of Science in Nursing

A Bachelor of Science in Nursing aims to prepare students for RN positions, but typically offers more in depth education in nursing theory and nursing practice.

What does a BSN-RN Do?

A nurse who holds a BSN degree typically performs many of the same roles as one with an APN degree. However, they may be more likely to be asked to perform leadership roles. They may:

  • Help with diagnostic tests
  • Analyze results from tests and labs
  • Teach patients and families how to take care of their medical needs
  • Operate advanced medical equipment
  • Set up patient care plans with the oversight of a doctor or head nurse

How to Become a BSN-RN

To pursue a career as a BSN-RN, you will need to complete a nursing bachelor’s degree program. Some students may start with an APN, then begin working, and then add their BSN courses. However, for those who do not have any nursing background, starting with the bachelor’s education directly may be an option.  to enhance your career. Online programs may make this a little easier.

Another option for non nurses who already have a bachelor’s degree is an accelerated BSN programs. An accelerated BSN program typically provides the nursing education without the general ed coursework that the student already learned. These accelerated programs are designed to allow the previous bachelor’s degree to count toward many prerequisite courses.

After completing the BSN program, a nurse will need to earn licensure as an RN. This typically includes passing criminal background checks, any state requirements, and passing the NCLEX-RN licensing exam.

Who is it for?

A Bachelor of Science in Nursing degree program may work for someone with no nursing education or experience, but who wants to pursue a career as a Registered Nurse.

How long could it take?

With no medical background, a BSN degree program usually takes about four years to complete. An accelerated BSN program may take as little as 15 to 18 months to complete. Online nursing programs may take less time if the students progresses through course work quickly.

Income Potential for BSN-RN

The BLS reports the median annual pay for all RNs is $73,300 per year as of 2019. However, those who hold a BSN degree are more likely to make higher income than those with an APN.

Master of Science in Nursing

A Master of Science in Nursing (MSN) degree may be required for advanced nursing professionals. It may be possible for non nurses to enter a direct entry MSN program, letting them earn this graduate degree from the start of their nursing career.

What does an MSN Nurse Do?

Holding an MSN degree could open the door to positions as an RN as well as a nurse practitioner. Some common roles filled by MSN graduates include:

  • Certified Nurse Midwife
  • Nurse Practitioner
  • Nurse Anesthetist

MSN nurses could pursue work in many concentration areas. They may also provide primary care to patients under the direction of a doctor.

How to Become an MSN Nurse

Many people who have an MSN start with a BSN and an RN license, but Direct Entry programs for non nurses could allow people with other degrees to earn an MSN. These typically require an undergrad degree in another field, but may cover basic nursing skills in addition to the advanced nursing practice common with an MSN. Many Direct Entry MSN programs are available with online components or as fully online degrees, with the exception of the clinical practice requirements.

Who is it for?

A Direct Entry MSN program may work for students who already have a bachelor’s degree in a non nursing field, but who want to change careers and pursue an RN. These programs typically include the necessary nursing courses to make up for the lack of nursing education on the bachelor’s degree level.

How long could it take?

Many MSN programs generally take between 15 months and two years to complete. Many may require clinical experiences or a practicum, but may offer online classes.

Income Potential for MSN Nurses

The BLS indicates the median annual wage for advanced level nurses is $115,800 in 2019. Nurse anesthetists earned the highest median annual salary of $174,790, followed by nurse practitioners at $109,820 and nurse midwives at $105,030.

Choosing a Nursing Concentration

RNs may have the option to choose a nursing concentration with many nursing programs. A concentration usually requires them to study a particular nursing area more in depth. This may help provide greater job security and income earning potential. Choosing a concentration requires careful thought and answering these questions:

What interests you? 

Because your career as an RN may focus a lot of your time and energy on your concentration, consider your interests and choose one that fits well. Do you thrive on adrenaline? Then working in emergency care or trauma may work well. Do you love children? Pediatrics could be a good fit. This is one important questions to ask when deciding on your nursing concentration because your concentration may direct your entire career.

How much patient contact do you want?

What does the daily work look like for a nurse in that specialty? Does it fit your goals and interests? Do you want to work closely with patients or work in an office, and could this career path open that door for you?

What job setting do you want?

Do you picture yourself in a hospital or a doctor’s office? Does in home health care seem to be a good fit for your career goals? Different specialties may create different opportunities, so consider this carefully.

What salary is typical for the concentration? 

The median annual salary for RNs varies significantly based on concentration. The BLS indicates those working in hospitals earn a median annual salary of $75,030, while those working in residential care earn a median annual salary of $66,250, for instance. Research the career potential of the concentration you’re considering.

What does your local job market need?

Unless you’re open to moving, you may want to focus on the demand in your local market. Is geriatrics in demand, or do you have a baby boom requiring obstetrics and pediatric nurses?

Do you love technology? 

If you love technology, you might want to focus in nursing informatics. This teaches RNs how to manage electronic health records.

Does the concentration require additional certs?

 Some concentration may require additional certification. Are you willing and able to pursue these in order to jumpstart your career as an RN?

Registered Nurse Career Outlook

So what does the future hold if you make a career change and start the process of earning your RN certification? Demand for registered nurses may continue to grow in the future, especially as the population continues to age and require more nursing care. According to the BLS, in 2019 there were 3,096,700 people employed as nurses in the United States. From 2019 to 2029, the anticipated job growth was 7%, which was faster than average. In that ten year time frame, an additional 221,900 jobs are expected. There may be many paths to kickstarting your career as a nurse. An online nursing degree for non nurses could be one of them. Take the required coursework online, finish your clinical hours, and pass your nursing examination to launch this career change.

Largest University Endowments

Endowments are funds put aside for a specific purpose. University endowments often include money and other assets donated to the school from some source. Schools uses these funds for many things. That includes research, teaching, and even public service goals. They are a powerful tool to help fund some of the latest innovations. Often, the largest university endowments translate into the best schools.

What Are University Endowments?

University endowments are a type of investment. What makes them unique is that they are structured in such a way as to allow the funds to last indefinitely, based on very strict financial guidelines. These funds typically have long-term guidelines put in place to help ensure the asset grows. It does this without as much risk as other types of investments. As a result, the university maintains a significant amount in the fund to meet ongoing needs.

What Is the Purpose of a University Endowment?

An endowment can work for many things. University endowments typically help finance some aspect of the school’s efforts. This could include supporting operations. It may include professorships. They often include scholarships as well. These are scholarships awarded from the endowment to students attending the school. Endowments are a valuable source of revenue for schools. They typically become an essential lifeline for some organizations. For others, the funds let the schools innovative, expand, grow, and change to meet new needs. Attending a school with the largest university endowments could mean more access to scholarships and better educational tools.

How Do They Work?

An endowment is given to the school. There is usually a specific goal or use for the funds. With scholarships, there may be requirements for students applying for them. The endowment goes into place. Over time, it builds value when the investments within it perform well. That helps to replenish the available to use funds. The school can award scholarships or use the funds as determined by the endowment on an annual basis.

Students who wish to access these endowments can do so by following the scholarship application requirements. These differ from one school to the next. Many schools have more than one endowment. The rules can vary between them. Look at some of the wealthiest universities in the United States based on modern market value.

Largest University Endowment Colleges

Which schools have the largest university endowments?

  1. Harvard University
  2. University of Texas System
  3. Yale University
  4. Stanford University
  5. Princeton University
  6. Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT)
  7. University of Pennsylvania
  8. Texas A&M University System
  9. University of Michigan
  10. Northwestern University
  11. University of California System
  12. Columbia University
  13. University of Notre Dame
  14. Duke University
  15. University of Chicago
  16. Washington University in St. Louis
  17. Emory University
  18. Cornell University
  19. University of Virginia
  20. Rice University
  21. University of Southern California
  22. Dartmouth College
  23. Ohio State University
  24. Vanderbilt University
  25. Johns Hopkins University

Let’s take a closer look at each of these schools as a study of endowments. Consider what each of these schools really has to offer.

1Harvard University – $38.3 Billion
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Harvard University has the largest university endowment in the U.S. It is easily recognized as an Ivy League school with much to offer as one of the richest universities in the world. The school has numerous endowments. The largest single-gift donor was John A. Paulson, an alumnus who donated $400 million to Harvard’s School of Engineering and Applied Sciences. Numerous donations of over $100 million have included gifts from David Rockefeller, Kenneth C. Griffin, Bill and Melinda Gates, and Emily Rauh Pultizer.

2University of Texas System – $30.8 Billion
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The University of Texas System has a heavy endowment history dating back to its founding in 1876. The funds here come from numerous donations including from Hearst Corp., Moody Foundation, and Mulva Family Foundation. The school uses these funds for many things including for the development of numerous schools including the establishment of the Bill & Melinda Gates Science Complex.

3Yale University – $29.3 Billion
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Yale, another Ivy League school, has received numerous donations to fund various endowments including $50 million from John C. Malone and $250 million from Charles B. Johnson. The funds, along with numerous other assets, help support scholarships, research and development, and other efforts.

4Stanford University – $26.4 Billion
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Stanford is recognized for its medicine, law, and engineering programs, as well as others. The school has a long history of financial support from alumni and other sources. Recent investments include Nike’s co-founder, Philip K. Knight who gave $400 million in 2016. The school uses the funds to support scholarship opportunities as well as for innovation development.

5Princeton University – $25.9 Billion
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As one of the oldest schools, having been founded in 1746, Princeton is well-recognized internationally especially for its arts programs, education programs, and medicine. The school receives donations for endowments routinely. Its largest comes from alumnus William H. Scheide in the form of rare books. Princeton’s endowments support a range of operational needs, but also research programs and arts programs.

6Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) – $16.5 Billion
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The Massachusetts Institute of Technology is a world-recognized leader in science, engineering, and tech. It has routinely been supported through donations and endowments including $350 million from Stephen Schwarzman, Blackstone CEO and $250 million from the F. W. Olin Foundation. A great deal of its endowments goes to support the incoming students through scholarships. Research projects in higher education are also heavily funded using endowments here.

7University of Pennsylvania – $13.7 Billion
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Benjamin Franklin co-founded the University of Pennsylvania. It is a heavily business-oriented school. Large donations for the university’s endowments have come from many establishments. That includes Raymond and Ruth Perelman with a $225 million donation. It also receives $400 million in private donations annually. These funds largely go to support student scholarships and operations. It is one of the richest public universities.

8Texas A&M University System – $13.5 Billion
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Spanning 11 campuses, Texas A&M is one of the largest in the U.S. Fundraising has helped establish many of the school’s endowments including $740 million in fiscal year 2013 alone. This is a heavily science-based school with significant ties to the National Institutes of Health and NASA. Much of its funding goes towards scholarships and science research and development.

9University of Michigan – $11.9 Billion
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An early benefactor to the University of Michigan was the Ford Motor Company. Stephen M. Ross, the owner of the Miami Dolphins, contributed the largest single donation of $100 million. The school also does well with fundraising to help support endowments. It is generous with its scholarship opportunities from endowments. Other funds sustain operations and support research programs.

10Northwestern University – $11 Billion
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Northwestern, a school with significant real estate as assets, also has been gifted many times to establish its endowments. The school also has seen significant success from its Innovation and New Venture Office. Since it opened it, the school has seen $75 million per year in revenue from the program. This, along with private donations, help the school to fund research programs, its medical school innovations, and scholarships.

11University of California System – $11 Billion
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The University of California has numerous consistent donations each year to create and maintain endowments. This includes $500 million from BP. Individual schools also receive endowment and donations. Much of this goes towards the school’s research programs with scholarship support as well.

12Columbia University – $10.6 Billion
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Founded as King’s College in 1754, Columbia University has grown to be one of the most recognized. It receives donations routinely from alumni and private organizations. It also does well in its patent business. That brings in about $200 million annually to support endowment projects such as scholarships and operations.

13University of Notre Dame – $10.7 Billion
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This Catholic University has a long history of support. Its largest single donation came from Kenn and Pamela Ricci of $100 million. Other supporters included NetApp executives Tom and Kathy Mendoza and the Joan B. Kroc Institute for International Peace Studies program, founded by the McDonald’s founding family. Much of its endowments go towards tuition and mission programs. Some support science and research programs.

14Duke University – $8.5 Billion
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The endowment at Duke comes from numerous private donations. Many of them are an alumnus. The school’s largest benefactor is Washington Duke who donated the land for the school. It is known for its school of engineering and business programs. Much of its endowment goes to student scholarships. Others are focused on research and innovation programs.

15University of Chicago – $7.9 Billion
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John D. Rockefeller established the school with a $600,000 donation in 1890. Davie G. Booth, an alumnus, is the school’s largest benefactor. He gave $300 million to the school. Many of its endowments have gone to help support the schools of business and medicine. A new center for the arts also came from endowment funds. It is also one of the largest scholarship providers on this list.

16Washington University in St. Louis – $7.5 Billion
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George Warren Brown is the largest single donor provider at Washington University in St. Louis. Additional funds came from John M. Olin. This established the school’s library and business school. The endowments for this school are often from alumni. The funds support scholarships for new students. It also uses the funds heavily for research and innovation programs. Its medical school is well-recognized. Funding often goes towards healthcare improvement.

17Emory University – $7.2 Billion
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Emory University is recognized for its engineering fields. It also noted for its nursing programs. Many of the donations provided here go to these programs. Robert W. Woodruff, a former Coca-Cola president, is the school’s largest benefactor. Much of its endowments go right back into the development of new programs and research efforts. Scholarships get a good amount of the funds, too.

18Cornell University – $7.2 Billion
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Cornell has a strong legal program, business program, and Southeast Asian studies program. It is also a strong architecture school. Much of its worth comes from the land it owns. The school receives much of its endowments from alumni. Large benefactors included Samuel Curtis Johnson and Charles H. Dyson. Scholarships, research and development, and school upgrades have been large uses for endowment funds over the years.

19University of Virginia – $6.9 Billion
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Founded by Thomas Jefferson in 1819, the University of Virginia is one of the largest programs. It is also a World Heritage Site. It receives numerous donations including a $100 million gift from Frank Batten, Sr. A $2.5 million donation from Anheuser-Busch helped the school established the recognized National Social Norm Institute. Its endowment funds support many new programs. This includes operations funds, scholarships, other financial aid, and research programs.

20Rice University – $6.2 Billion
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Rice University’s first benefactor, William Marsh Rice, donated $4.6 million to start the school. A $50 million donation from John and Ann Doerr is the largest the school has received. The school has a strong reputation in areas of science and tech along with business. The endowment funds typically go to support operations, school launches, scholarships, and the development of new programs.

21University of Southern California – $5.5 Billion
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Recognized for film, engineering, medicine, and business. Its largest donations came from W.M. Keck Foundation with $110 million, Gordon S. Marshall, an alumnus, who donated $35 million, and the Price Family Charitable Fund offering $50 million. Endowments support student scholarships and needs. Some have also helped establish new schools and programs. This school also has a large research base.

22Dartmouth College – $5.4 Billion
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As one of the largest landowners in the state, Dartmouth’s endowment assets help to secure the school’s overall assets. The school has received large donations for endowments from many people. This includes Audrey and Theodor “Dr. Seuss” Geisel, Sylvanus Thayer, and Amos Truck. Funds typically help open new schools. The school also is generous with scholarship funds from endowments.

23Ohio State University – $5.2 Billion
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The Ohio State University has numerous benefactors, many of which are alumni. The school received a $65 million donation from Leslie and Abigail Wexner, for example. Much of the funds go towards the school’s impressive research programs. It has heavy science and medicine research and innovation schools. The school also offers scholarships to students for some of the endowment funds.

24Vanderbilt University – $4.6 Billion
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Vanderbilt’s numerous donations and endowments helped it to become the school of science and medicine it is today. It offers numerous impressive medical facilities to show for much of the donations it has received. Most come from private donors, without any single donation standing out. Alumni heavily support this school. It offers endowment scholarships and research program awards.

25John Hopkins University – $4.3 Billion
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Johns Hopkins, a known philanthropist, founded Johns Hopkins University in 1876. He did so with a goal of becoming a leading research school. That is exactly what it has become. It received many grants and awards for its innovative programs. Michael Bloomberg, former New York City mayor, donated $350 million to the school. Much of these endowments go towards the funding of research programs – it is the largest school in expenses for research programs in the world. Scholarships are available, too.

Vote By Mail Common Issues

Vote By Mail Common Issues

As Americans are preparing to vote by mail in large numbers in the 2020 Presidential Elections, we wanted to make you all aware of the many vote by mail common issues. This year is different than any other election. The COVID-19 pandemic as a whole are changing the way people want to vote. Some states are working to make it possible for more people to vote using mail ballots. No matter who you plan to vote for, it is important to know how to ensure your vote counts.

Many Republicans and Democrats want a fair election. Many have pushed to ensure registered voters have access to polling places and mail voting. The U.S. Postal Service is working to ensure ballot applications and absentee ballots allow for early voting in a fair manner. 

Yet, many of the vote by mail common issues come from simple mistakes that voters make. Human error is a big factor in why your vote may not make the count. This may be even more common if you have never voted before and are unsure of the process. That is why it is so important for you to take the time to follow the rules as closely as possible. Become familiar with the process. Read through your state’s requirements. These are simple things to do to help protect your vote.

First, not all states are allowing mail in voting as a result of the pandemic. Many have rules about who are eligible vote. Make sure you are a registered voter before you request a ballot, for example. The key to remember is it is possible in most states to vote from home. Yet, you need to know the rules and timelines for doing so.

Vote by Mail Mistakes That Cost

Many election officials want each and every vote to count. This applies to the general election. It also applies to any local election.& Many locations have very specific voting rules. This includes for in person voting. These rules may work to reduce voter fraud.

To make sure your vote counts for the November Election, follow the guidelines of the state’s Secretary of State when it comes to mail elections or in person elections. Most importantly, try to avoid these common mistakes.

Improperly Filled Out Ballots

Fill out the ballot accurately, completely, and properly. Many voters receive a package of information that outlines the process and procedures. Each state is a bit different. Follow the requirements and information set by your state. 

Mistakes in filling out ballots may be numerous. Not completing the ballot is one of them. Another is getting the ballot dirty or allow it to be damaged. Fill it out on a flat, clean, dry surface. Remove all risk of spills when possible. Read through all of the instructions as a next step. 

Ballot technology needs to be able to pick up on the selections you choose. These machines – which may work a bit like those old tests called Scantrons you took in grade school – need to pick up on the color and position of your marks. That is why you may have instructions telling you what color or type of ink to use. Using red ink or marker may be a key problem with these. 

Make sure you keep those marks within the box. Avoid making any marks outside of these boxes or areas. Stray marks on other areas may cause confusion. 

Only fill in the right spaces. For example, only fill in one box in a multiple choice question or area. If you fill in two, or leave a stray mark in one box and fill in another, that may cause confusion. That may mean your vote does not count. 

What happens if a ballot does have mistakes like this?

Many states use canvassing boards. These are people who may make decisions by looking at the ballots by hand. This is important for many reasons. When a person uses an in person voting system, called a tabulator, it immediately shoots back a ballot that is not filled in properly. It kicks it back to the voter. The voter then may make decisions or fix it. You know there is an error. This does not happen with mail in voting. There is no way to know the problem until it goes through the system at the voting office. There is no second chance opportunity to fix these mistakes. 

The best rule – take your time to ensure you use the right ink, fill in just the area you should, and protect that ballot from any damage.

Signing the Envelope

Another potential problem with ballots has to do with signing the actual envelope. States go through a process to verify that the ballot is legitimate. They need to be sure the right person is casting the ballot. To do this, they verify information. One part of that is having the voter sign an affidavit.

Every state has rules for the affidavit. It is generally located on the outside of the envelope. This is the envelope that holds the mail ballot. This signature means that the person submitting the ballot is affirming their identity. They are also stating they are eligible to vote in this election. 

It is sometimes common for these signatures to be missing. If they are missing, the ballot may not be cast for you. Remember, this is an additional signature that is noted on the outside of the envelope. It is not just the signature required inside on the application.

Signatures That Do Not Match

In a primary election like this, details matter. Many times, mistakes are made in how voters sign their ballot. When mailing ballots, the signatures on the interior of the ballot and on the ballot’s envelope must match. If they do not, that may be an indication of fraud to the voting officials. Sign the ballot in the same way every time. 

In addition to this, many states have systems in place to double check signatures. This is not just on the ballot received but also going further back. They may check the ballot’s signature to the one on file with the election board or county clerk’s office. Some may check the ballot signature with the one on the absentee ballot application provided. Some may use other government files or systems to determine if they match. This may include the Department of Motor Vehicles or other government agencies. 

The belief is that matching signatures like this helps to verify the authenticity of the ballot. In some situations, states go further. They may make it necessary for a voter to verify his or her signature. This may be done, for example, by requiring one or two witnesses to sign the document. These people should be over the age of 18. In some cases, a notary public or other official witness must sign the absentee ballot. 

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Southern New Hampshire University

  • Take advantage of some of the nation’s most affordable tuition rates, while earning a degree from a private, nonprofit, NEASC accredited university.
  • Generous transfer policy, accepting up to 90 credits; the university also partners with community colleges for easy transfer..
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University of Arizona Global Campus

  • Accredited University offering Associate’s, Bachelor’s and Master’s Degrees
  • Affordable tuition, 5-6 week courses, and various payment options
  • 80+ online programs
Ashford University

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Why So Many Rules?

These rules aim to help make submitting votes safer. Yet, this added security may increase the risk of mistakes that may lead to a vote not being counted. Sometimes, they are not rejected. Rather, the election officials may challenge them. This means the officials want more information or verification of the accuracy of the voting. 

It may be more common for younger voters to have problems with this. You may struggle if you sign your name in different ways, for example. If you do not have any experience with signing official documents, that may also make it a bit harder to complete this form with confidence. 

Some states do have a cure process. This allows the voter a chance to correct the problem with their signatures. This may allow their ballot to be counted. However, if there is limited time, that may not be possible.

Voters Fail to Provide Necessary Documentation

Some states require voters to do a bit more work to obtain their absentee ballot and to submit it for it to be counted. Mail balloting is not always a simple process. When it comes to mail, states differ on these requirements. Use the resources below to verify what your state requires to minimize the risk of problems reported by elections officials. 

As noted previously, some states require voters to submit their ballots with witness signatures as well. Some also require identification to be sent in with the ballot. This may include a photo copy of a state-issued identification. It may include submitting information about Social Security numbers – such as the last four digits of the number – with the application. In other cases, a driver’s license or state ID number must be submitted. 

A mistake some people make is not knowing these requirements. If a voter makes a mistake with his or her driver’s license number, for example, that may lead to a challenge or rejection of the ballot. Small mistakes like this may be costly to you when voting. 

Missing Deadlines for Sending the Ballot Back 

States set the rules for when absentee ballots must be returned. Some states have elections officials go through the applications to verify signatures. That takes time. That means voters must return the absentee ballots in enough time to allow that to be done. Also, if there is a challenge to a ballot, there needs to be some time to allow for the ballot to be returned. Then, the voter has to cast another ballot. Or, he or she may need to supply other details. That, too, takes time. 

A key mistake then is not following instructions for returning the document. Many applications for ballots as well as the ballots themselves have instructions on how and when to return ballots. Some states have rules about using universal mail. Delays with the post office may also make it hard for voters to cast a ballot in time if they wait too long. 

Tight deadlines are a critical factor. If you plan to vote, be sure this information is understood. The postmark on your ballot has to be within the specifications set by the state. Doing this before that date may be helpful, too, to help avoid any delays related to the post office.

Voter Mistakes & Statistics You Should Know

To help you get ready to vote, consider a few of the key statistics about voting by mail as well as voting in general. Avoid all of these vote by mail common issues!

Vote by Mail Policies for Your State

If you plan to vote in the presidential election, be sure to check your state’s specific rules. States allow voters to place their vote in various ways. You should still know about voter registration and absentee ballot requests. 

Here is the link to each state’s rules. You may also verify it through the National Conference of State Legislatures:

How Much Do College Professors Make?

How Much Do College Professors Make?

Just how much money do college professors make? If you are thinking about teaching, you may wonder how much college professors earn. The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reports the median wage for professors is $79,540, as of May of 2019. Many factors play a role in how much professors make. This includes their experience, training, and education. Salary range is just one component of importance when learning about professor positions and experience. Many also do a lot more work. This includes publishing scholarly articles. Others conduct research. Take a look at some key information about this job market. Profs who complete graduate school often earn at the national average listed here. So, how much do college professors earn?

Types of College Professors

Many people do not know there are numerous types of college professors. They range based on the type of work they do. They also range based on their experience and how long they have worked for the school. Here are some types of college professors. 

Law Professor

Annual Median wage: $113,530 

Law professors teach law. They also teach other aspects of law. This may include social justice. Some may teach political science. To be a law professor, they may earn a Juris Doctorate (JD) degree. This comes from a law school. They must pass a bar exam. Others may have graduated from a recognized law school. Others could have a legal practice. Many publish law reviews. They may also be published in legal journals. 

Economics Professor

Annual Median wage: $104,370 

Professors of economics focus on business courses. They often focus in economics. Many schools require these professors to have a Ph.D. to teach. They may often have a significant level of experience in the field. Many worked as economics educators for a long time before taking on professor roles. Many are published in recognized economic journals and publications. 

Engineering Professors

Annual Median wage: $101,010

Engineering professors are often focused in one area. Some are civil engineering professors. That means they may teach students about the construction industry and designing cities. They may focus on roads, airports, water supply systems, or other areas. Mechanical engineer professors may teach math and physics courses. Some also work with computer design and program. They may help students learn how to build machines. These professors may need a PhD to teach. 

Health Specialties Professors

Annual Median wage: $97,320 

Health specialties professors teach at all levels of health care science and medicine. Most of the time, these professionals hold a medical degree and license. (That may include an MD, MBChB, MBBCh, DO, MBBS, or BMBS). Many could also have some experience working in the field. They often have education credits to their name as well. Most often, schools require these professors to have experience.

Science Professors

Annual Median wage: $92,040

These professors may focus in one or more fields. Some examples include earth science, atmospheric science, or marine science. Many have advanced education and research in their field. Geoscience professors are another version. These teachers often have a PhD. This is a research field. Many schools hire professors who are published through research projects as a result. Some may also have working experience in their field. Many could have years of educational experience behind them. 

Physics Professors

Annual Median wage: $89,590

This is another science type of professor. These teachers will often teach at a higher level of science. They tend to have more advanced training, but also more working knowledge in these fields. This may include a nuclear or quantum science degree. Others may work in astro physics. Hands on experience is helpful. Most important is having a research study or to be published for scientific findings to work as a physics professor. Many may also have a PhD in their selected field.

Architecture Professors

Annual Median wage: $87,900

Architecture professors may have worked in this field in some form for years. Some may hold a PhD in this area. This type of instruction is heavily science and math based. That is why this type of teacher often holds an advanced education in these areas. Some are published. Others are known for their innovation and successful projects.

Business Professors

Annual Median wage: $87,200

Business professors are often versatile. They may teach a range of different aspects of business. Some may concentrate in one or more areas. This may include business management or marketing. Finance and accounting professors are also very focused. Many business professors have advanced degrees. This could be a Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) degree or a Doctor of Business Administration (DBA). It also may be common for business professors to have working experience in some area. Many of these teachers could be published in academic journals. They often have a significant amount of experience in public events or academic conferences.

Computer Science Professors

Annual Median wage: $85,180

Computer science professors work with students teaching programming and software engineering. They often have a lot of skills in this area from their own studies. Many may have a PhD. Some could have worked for industry leaders. They may have concentration in areas of information technology. Others may have experience in computer engineering solely. These professors may also be some of the leaders in their field.

Biology Professors

Annual Median wage: $83,300

These professors teach in areas like biology or zoology. They may often be published in research reports or may have conducted research studies. They may focus in specific areas of biology, though some are more general. Often, they hold a PhD. Biology instructors are often involved in research. Research grants and programs may help make this possible. Others might work with post doctoral fellows.

Chemistry Professors

Annual Median wage: $79,550

Chemistry professors may be very focused. Some focus on areas of macromolecules. Others are stereochemistry specialists. Still, others focus on biopolymers. These teachers often have advanced education and often are published. They may engage in research at the school they teach at on a routine basis. They may often be published in scientific journals. Many are involved in an ongoing basis. Some have industry expertise from having worked in the field. Many are education based.

Psychology Professors

Annual Median wage: $76,620

These professors teach psychology. This requires them to have advanced education in this area. Most may have an advanced teaching degree. However, many also have field experience. They may have worked in a clinical setting. Others are focused on the lab elements of psychology and research. Many are published in scientific or medical research studies. In their university positions, psych professors often run studies and participate in publications.

Sociology Professors

Annual Median wage: $75,290

These professors work in both the sciences and in psych. They often provide education to students on a path towards sociology, but also work with students in related fields. Many will be published in papers and working to continue to do this on an ongoing basis. Many are actively engaged in research. Their students often participate in it. Some will engage in field work especially in underdeveloped areas. Many have a working history in these fields.

Philosophy Professors

Annual Median wage: $75,240

These professors may focus on religion while others focus on strictly philosophical studies. They may also work in areas of business ethics and metaphysics. Often, these professors may have a strong history in research. They may become experts in one or more areas and generally focus in these areas. Philosophy professors are always exploring new thoughts and methods of doing things. That is why they have such a varied line up of courses to teach. They do a good deal of their own research and publishing as well.

History Professors

Annual Median wage: $75,170

History professors teach history courses, but also often teach areas related to this. Some will work in the field, such as in museums or even archaeology. Others will work in historical societies or hold memberships in them. They could become experts in history, often in a certain area or type of history, but many are also dedicated to research. Many history teachers are diverse in their knowledge base. They may publish books or articles on areas that are important to them or where they concentrate.

Nursing Professors

Annual Median wage: $74,600

Not all nursing instructors hold the position of professor. Many universities hire nursing professors for both hands on education and lecture related to medicine and nursing practice. They may work with undergrad or grad students. Often, nursing professors must hold a registered nurse (RN) degree. They may need a license as well. Many may continue their education to earn a doctorate degree. Some professors in this field publish in scientific papers. Others work to develop new technology or innovations in the field. Nearly all may have some level of on the job experience.

Math Science Professors

Annual Median wage: $73,690

Math professors focus their education in math and mathematical sciences. They may teach everything from beginning levels of math to in depth, advanced topics. Many will concentrate in one or more areas. This may include areas as far reaching as automorphic forms and game theory. Many math teachers are often working to advanced their field through research. Some are published.

Social Sciences Professors

Annual Median wage: $71,530

These professors often teach courses, but may also engage in research studies on college campuses. In addition to this, many also have significant fieldwork experience. Some may also engage in social science research in underdeveloped areas. They often have a PhD but continuing education is usually a part of their work.

Communications Professors

Annual Median wage: $70,630

Those working as a communications prof may teach a range of courses. This could include areas of public relations. It may include broadcasting or journalism. Many may have some level of media communications skill. In addition to this, most communications profs will have working skills and some experience in the field they focus in. 

Art and Music Professors

Annual Median wage: $69,530

Those working in the area of music, arts, and performance may have a significant amount of experience in the field. They may teach a range of subjects, such as theater or vocals, but many professors will focus in one or more areas. They often work hand in hand with students.

English Professors

Annual Median wage: $68,490

These professors teach various areas of English studies. This includes language and literature. They may also focus in areas such as creative writing or critical theory. Many will also have advanced studies and experience in the field. They often hold doctorates. Research may not be heavy in this area, but continuing education might be.

Education Professors

Annual Median wage: $65,510

Education professors teach new teachers. They teach undergraduate students and some masters programs. Some also hold a philosophy in education degree. Many are published in some way, often in educational methods. They may have experience working as educators.

1

Southern New Hampshire University

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  • Generous transfer policy, accepting up to 90 credits; the university also partners with community colleges for easy transfer.
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2

Purdue Global University

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Levels of Professors

Teaching higher education may be complex. While looking at university professor salaries is important, it is also important to consider the level of the professor. This could indicates the type of work the professor does and his or her experience. Here is a list of professor levels. They differ by school. A community college may use a different term.

Adjunct Instructor

Adjunct instructors often teach entry level courses. This may also be called a part time lecturer or part time instructor. Many do not receive a full time salary or benefits. They may work less often in their college program. Many will have additional jobs outside of the college setting. These instructors may go on to more advanced teaching later.

Graduate Teaching Assistant

A graduate teaching assistant is a GTA. They tend to work much like an adjunct instructor. The difference is that they are students themselves. Many will be in a master’s program. Some graduate programs offer students a stipend. This may help covers the cost of tuition and pays a small wage. In return, they may teach one or more classes. These are not full time faculty members.

Visiting Professor

A visitor professor is working temporarily at the school. They may be called a visiting researcher. Sometimes they are called a visiting scholar. The term differs based on the school. Some schools use these pros to help them offer a new perspective for students. They may collaborate with other students. In the U.S., it is common for visiting professors to be from another country. This is not always the case. Sometimes, professors on sabbatical may still take appointments as a visiting professor.

Assistant Professor

These individuals support the work of a professor. They tend to not work full time. They may help in areas of conducting research. Others may work with students directly. Working as an assistant professor could be the first step towards tenure. These are usually hard to get jobs. Many times, assistant professors already hold a doctorate degree.

Associate Professor

These are generally tenure seeking professors. This is often a tenure track position. It falls between assistant and full professorship. This may differ from one school to the next. Many professors reach this level when they achieve tenure. This may take up to seven years to complete. Publications and research are a part of the process. These are often full time faculty. They may earn faculty salaries.

Full Professor

Full professorship may often be earned after years of holding an associate level of tenure. This is generally the highest promotion for tenure track professors.

Endowed Professor

These professors may also be called an endowed chair. It is a type of honor given to a faculty member. This typically is due to the research carried out by the professor. 

Distinguished Professor

This is a title given to a top tenured professor at the school. They are often some of the most well respected in their field. Years of experience matters in this field. Private colleges often have these types of professors.

Can You Get into College with a GED? Here’s What You Need to Know

Can You Get into College with a GED?

Here’s What You Need to Know. Let Us Help You Get Matched For FREE!

Can You Get into College With a GED?

Many colleges and universities accept students with a GED. While some students fear they can’t get into college without a traditional high school diploma, that’s far from the case. You can potentially get into college with a GED! You must meet the college’s other admissions requirements. Additionally, you may also be interested in trade schools that don’t require a high school diploma or GED.  

Does a GED Affect College Acceptance? 

Earning a GED instead of a high school diploma may not matter, depending on the college you apply to. It’s considered a high school equivalency. The main thing is to meet the school’s admissions requirements and stand out as an applicant.   

Your GED score may make a difference, though. A passing score is 145 on each test subject. But a score of 165-174 is considered “GED® College Ready.” This may be a good sign that you have the skills to start college. And a score of 175-200 is considered “GED® College Ready + Credit.” This means you likely already know some of the skills taught in college classes. So, you might be eligible to earn college credit for your prior skills and knowledge. Having a higher GED score does not guarantee college acceptance. But, it may be a plus.  

What if You Have a Low GED Score?

If you have a low GED score, you could test again to try for a higher score. If you didn’t pass a subject test, you get two retests. If you fail the third test (and beyond), you have to wait 60 days before trying again. Your state may have other rules, too. Even if you passed all your subject tests, you are allowed to retake them to improve your score. GED prep courses or practice tests could potentially help you boost your score.  

Are College Admission Requirements Different With a GED?

Often, applying with a GED does not have different admissions requirements. Except the GED itself, of course. You will have to submit your scores along with your high school or prior college transcripts. Some schools may only accept GED applicants who took the GED in the same state as the college.

Your school may also require or suggest that you take extra steps to prove you are college ready. Like, earning a certain number of credits at your local community college to show you can do college coursework. You may need to submit standardized test scores, like the SAT or ACT – even if that’s not required for all students. Always check with your prospective college about the admissions process for applying with a GED.

1

Southern New Hampshire University

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Purdue Global University

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Am I Eligible for Financial Aid if I Have a GED? 

You may apply for federal financial aid with a GED. That doesn’t guarantee you will get financial aid. You must meet other eligibility requirements, too. Financial aid may be available to those who qualify. But, a GED is considered acceptable proof that you are qualified to pursue federal aid for college. Or career school.

Wondering about your school’s financial aid programs? Check with them, directly. 

Finally, you may be able to apply for scholarships for students who have a GED. There are plenty of scholarship programs out there. Some may be designed to help students who took nontraditional paths.   

What is Ability to Benefit? 

Ability to Benefit is another way of showing you qualify to pursue higher education. Like a college degree or career school. Even if you don’t have a high school diploma or GED. This is for the purpose of applying for federal aid. This may apply to you if: 

  • You were enrolled in college or career school before July 1, 2012 or
  • You are now enrolled in an eligible career pathway program

Your college could give you an approved ability-to-benefit test. This may help show you could benefit from education at that school. Or, you could earn six credit hours or the equivalent toward a degree or certificate. You may not get aid while earning those six credits. But, it’s another way to help prove you qualify to pursue higher ed and federal financial aid. 

What Type of Colleges Accept GEDs? 

Any type of college may accept GEDs, including:

  • Community Colleges, Junior Colleges, Technical Colleges. These colleges may admit a wide range of students – even those without a GED or diploma. Attending one of these institutions could be a potential way to earn an Associate’s degree or other credential. Or, transfer credits toward a four-year school.
  • Four-year College or University. These could be private or public, and they come in all different shapes and sizes. From large state universities to small, private colleges. When applying, check with the admissions office to see what’s needed from applicants with a GED credential. Like, a certain number of transfer credits.
  • Online Colleges. You are not just limited to traditional colleges. Online schools may accept GED applicants. Some offer adult education programs aimed at nontraditional students. Look for accredited online colleges and universities.  

Online Colleges that Accept GEDs 

1 Pennsylvania State University – World Campus
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World Campus is the online branch of Penn State. Started in 1998, it strives to offer accessible distance learning. Courses are the same as those offered on campus. Choose from career focused Associate’s, Bachelor’s degree, and graduate programs.

Have a GED? You’re welcome to apply. Applicants must send transcripts of their GED results. They also need to report all coursework taken in high school. World Campus also offers programs for returning students and adult learners. And, others with a nontraditional academic background. 

Admission requirements (for GED applicants) include

  • GED transcripts 
  • High school record 
  • SAT or ACT scores

2019/20 Tuition & Fees

Undergrad Tuition & Fees: $13,988 
Grad Tuition & Fees: $21,682 + $504 fees

Average Amount of Financial Aid (2019/20)

Grants & Awards: 50% get, avg. amt. $8,678

Federal Loans: 51% get, avg. amt. $5,341

Grad Rate

71%

Salary After Attending

$19k – $68k

2 Southern New Hampshire University 
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SNHU is a private, nonprofit, accredited school. It has a campus in Manchester, NH that serves 3,000 students. But, most learners study online – over 135,000 of them! Choose from over 200 programs in everything from education to STEM subjects.  

You may apply to SNHU with a GED. For online programs, the application process is pretty simple. You’ll need to do an online college application. And, talk to an admissions counselor. They’ll walk you through next steps. 

Admission requirements (for GED applicants) include

  • GED 
  • Letters of recommendation 
  • College prep courses

2019/20 Tuition & Fees

Undergrad Tuition & Fees: $31,136*
Grad Tuition & Fees: $18,810* 

Average Amount of Financial Aid (2019/20)

Grants & Awards: 71% get, avg. amt. of $10,243

Federal Loans: 65% get, avg. amt. of $5,482

Grad Rate

44%

Salary After Attending

$26k – $72k

3 Liberty University 
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Liberty is an evangelical Christian liberal arts institution. Along with its Lynchburg, VA campus, it is known for its online programs. Liberty offers 700+ programs, include certificate programs, undergrad, and grad programs. Over 450 of these may be earned online.  

Besides traditional high school graduates, those with a GED are welcome to apply. To apply to any of Liberty’s online programs, you must submit an online High School and GED self certification form. Other requirements may depend on the program you’re interested in. 

Admission requirements (for GED applicants) include

  • GED transcripts 
  • High school record

2019/20 Tuition & Fees

Undergrad Tuition & Fees: $22,747*
Grad Tuition & Fees: $7,980* + $420 fees 

Average Amount of Financial Aid (2019/20)

Grants & Awards: 92% get, avg. amt. of $11,369

Federal Loans: 56% get, avg. amt. of $5,489

Grad Rate

47%

Salary After Attending

$15k – $67k

4 University of Massachusetts – Amherst
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UMassOnline is the online version of this well known state university. Along with the five physical UMass campuses, online learning offers another way to earn your degree. In fact, distance learning has been available at the University of Massachusetts for over 25 years! 

Any student with a high school diploma or GED may register for courses. But, this is not the same as program acceptance. You must apply through the campus that sponsors the online program you are interested in. Like, Amherst. Follow admissions requirements for that campus. 

Admission requirements (for GED applicants) include

  • GED transcripts 
  • High school record 
  • Recommendations

2019/20 Tuition & Fees

Undergrad Tuition & Fees: $35,710
Grad Tuition & Fees: $29,529 + $2,195 fees 

Average Amount of Financial Aid (2019/20)

Grants & Awards: 82% get, avg. amt. of $9,517

Federal Loans: 52% get, avg. amt. of $5,345

Grad Rate

82%

Salary After Attending

$22k – $75k

5 Grand Canyon University 
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GCU is a private university in Phoenix, AZ. It offers campus based and online learning. Pursue online degrees in education, business, liberal arts, or nursing and health sciences. Online degree programs are offered at the Bachelor’s, Master’s and doctoral degree levels. 

GED applicants are welcome. There are min score requirements, though. If you took the 2014 or later series, you need a cumulative score of 680 or above. If you took the 2002-2013 Series, you need to score 3000 or above. And for the 2002 Series and prior, 258 or above. 

Admission requirements (for GED applicants) include

  • Minimum cumulative GED score
  • High school record

2019/20 Tuition & Fees

Undergrad Tuition & Fees: $17,800*
Grad Tuition & Fees: $10,175* + $899 fees 

Average Amount of Financial Aid (2019/20)

Grants & Awards: 99% get, avg. amt. of $9,933

Federal Loans: 67% get, avg. amt. $5,587

Grad Rate

41%

Salary After Attending

$25k – $75k

6 Purdue University Global 
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Purdue Global is a public, online university, part of the Purdue University System. It’s designed for working adult students. Students may try their online courses for three weeks, without risk. Many start dates throughout the year and flexible course scheduling may make this school the perfect match. 

Purdue Global has an open admissions policy. It admits undergrad students with either a high school or GED diploma. But you must meet the school’s academic standards during your 3 week trial period. Some of the programs may have other admissions rules.  

Admission requirements (for GED applicants) include

  • Proof of GED

2019/20 Tuition & Fees

Undergrad Tuition & Fees: $14,358
Grad Tuition & Fees: $9,768 + $812 fees 

Average Amount of Financial Aid (2019/20)

Grants & Awards: 71% get, avg. amt. $5,596

Federal Loans: 24% get, avg. amt. $5,158

Grad Rate

27%

Salary After Attending

$22k – $71k

7 New York University 
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NYU is a large, private university with locations in New York City and around the world. It is known for its innovative research and diversity. NYU is home to select online degree programs. Plus, you can take online courses as part of a traditional degree program. 

The GED (General Equivalency Diploma) is accepted as proof of high school graduation. Homeschooled students who do not have a homeschool diploma or other proof of graduation can also take the GED.  

Admission requirements (for GED applicants) include

  • GED 
  • Transcripts 
  • Recommendations 
  • Formal demonstration of competencies

2019/20 Tuition & Fees

Undergrad Tuition & Fees: $53,308* 
Grad Tuition & Fees: $33,408* + $2,154 fees 

Average Amount of Financial Aid (2019/20)

Grants & Awards: 46% get, avg. amt. $33,694

Federal Loans: 29% get, avg. amt. $5,180

Grad Rate

85%

Salary After Attending

$16k – $92k

8 CSU Global 
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CSU Global is part of the Colorado State University System. It’s an accredited, nonprofit state school. And, it offers fully online degree programs. Choose from career focused fields. Like, Business, Criminal Justice, and Finance. 

You are welcome to apply with a GED. CSU has other unique rules that not all schools have. For instance, first-year applicants may need to apply with two years of work experience, min. Students over 23 years old, or those who have at least 24 prior college credits, may not need the work experience.  

Admission requirements (for GED applicants) include

  • GED
  • High school record 

2019/20 Tuition & Fees

Undergrad Tuition & Fees: $8,400*
Grad Tuition & Fees: $9,000* 

Average Amount of Financial Aid (2019/20)

Grants & Awards: $3,682

Federal Loans: $7,338

Grad Rate

N/A

Salary After Attending

$26k – $70k

9 University of Arizona Global Campus 
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UAGC is a private, for-profit college. It offers distance education to help busy adults pursue their goals. Associate’s, Bachelor’s, and graduate programs are offered. Choose from subjects ranging from Business to Liberal Arts. 

At UAGC, your GED counts as proof of high school graduation. UAGC has an open admissions policy. But to be fully admitted, you must meet certain requirements in your initial coursework. That includes earning a grade of C- or better by Day 6 of Week 3 in your first course.  

Admission requirements (for GED applicants) include

  • GED

2019/20 Tuition & Fees

Undergrad Tuition & Fees: $12,400*
Grad Tuition & Fees: $12,060* + $750 fees 

Average Amount of Financial Aid (2019/20)

Grants & Awards: 84% get, avg. amt. $4,701

Federal Loans: 68% get, avg. amt. $6,717

Grad Rate

8%

Salary After Attending

$20k – $54k

10 Columbia Southern University 
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CSU is an online university in Orange Beach, Alabama. It awards undergraduate and graduate degrees, plus certificates. Columbia Southern is known for programs in areas like occupational safety and health, fire administration, and much more. It is accredited by the Distance Education Accrediting Commission. 

For admission, you must have a high school equivalency – that includes the GED. Columbia Southern has an open admissions policy. But you will need to prove yourself in your initial courses. Undergrads must earn 12 credits. And, meet qualitative and quantitative criteria. At that point, they may be fully admitted. 

Admission requirements (for GED applicants) include

  • GED

2019/20 Tuition & Fees

Undergrad Tuition & Fees: $5,655* 
Grad Tuition & Fees: $3,780* + $135 fees 

Average Amount of Financial Aid (2019/20)

Grants & Awards: 92% get, avg. amt. $3,552

Federal Loans: 60% get, avg. amt. $6,007

Grad Rate

22%

Salary After Attending

$26k – $67k

11 Colorado Technical University 
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Colorado Technical University is a career focused school offering programs with a tech emphasis. Though, you’ll also find programs in Nursing, Criminal Justice, and more. CTU has campus locations in Colorado, plus online programs.   

At CTU, the GED meets the high school graduation requirement. Beyond that, the school has an open admissions policy. So, there aren’t set requirements besides documentation of your GED. Contact an admissions advisor to learn more.  

Admission requirements (for GED applicants) include

  • GED

2019/20 Tuition & Fees

Undergrad Tuition & Fees: $12,529* 
Grad Tuition & Fees: $13,710* + $611 fees 

Average Amount of Financial Aid (2019/20)

Grants & Awards: 89% get, avg. amt. $6,047

Federal Loans: 75% get, avg. amt. $6,717

Grad Rate

26%

Salary After Attending

$23k – $72k

12 National University 
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National University is a private, nonprofit institution. It’s based in San Diego, CA, but also offers online programs. Choose from over 75 degree programs at various levels. You can even focus on one subject at a time, in accelerated, 4-week classes.  

National University is a private, nonprofit institution. It’s based in San Diego, CA, but also offers online programs. Choose from over 75 degree programs at various levels. You can even focus on one subject at a time, in accelerated, 4-week classes.  

Admission requirements (for GED applicants) include

  • GED transcripts 
  • Formal demonstration of competencies (may be optional) 
  • SAT or ACT scores (optional)

2019/20 Tuition & Fees

Undergrad Tuition & Fees: $13,320* 
Grad Tuition & Fees: $15,480* 

Average Amount of Financial Aid (2019/20)

Grants & Awards: N/A

Federal Loans: Avg. amt. $11,042

Grad Rate

29%

Salary After Attending

N/A

13 Thomas Edison State University 
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Thomas Edison State University is a 4-year public school. It is based in Trenton, New Jersey. The school focuses on adult learners. Many students pursue their degrees online. But, you can also visit the historic campus to meet with your advisor, take a proctored exam, or just explore.  

This school has an open admissions policy. You are welcome to apply with a GED. But, you must be at least 20 years old. If you are a member of the military, you can be 18 or older. And it is possible to apply for exceptions to this rule. 

Admission requirements (for GED applicants) include

  • GED

2019/20 Tuition & Fees

Undergrad Tuition & Fees: $9,856
Grad Tuition & Fees: $12,024 

Average Amount of Financial Aid (2019/20)

Grants & Awards: Avg. amt. $3,450

Federal Loans: Avg. amt. $7,299

Grad Rate

N/A

Salary After Attending

$37k – $80k

14 Brandman University 
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Brandman is a private, nonprofit school for working adults. You may choose from fully online or hybrid programs. Hybrid programs blend online and on campus courses. Brandman even offers competency based programs. These could let you move forward in your courses through life and work experience.  

You may apply to an Associate’s degree program at Brandman with a GED. If you don’t have at least 12 transferable credits, you’ll need to pass admissions exam in English and Math. Hoping to pursue a four year degree? You must earn at least 12 eligible transfer credits to apply to a Bachelor’s degree program. These must be from a regionally accredited institution. 

Admission requirements (for GED applicants) include

  • GED
  • Transcripts
  • Formal demonstration of competencies 

2019/20 Tuition & Fees

Undergrad Tuition & Fees: $12,440*
Grad Tuition & Fees: $11,880* + $440 fees 

Average Amount of Financial Aid (2019/20)

Grants & Awards: 89% get, avg. amt. $3,507

Federal Loans: Avg. amt. $9,187

Grad Rate

60%

Salary After Attending

$30k – $51k

15 University Of Maryland Global Campus 
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UMGC is an online state university. Part of the University System of Maryland, it strives to serve working adults and military service members. Choose from over 90 degree programs and paths. In almost every course, digital course materials are included at no extra cost. 

This school has an open admissions policy. You can apply to UMGC with a passing GED score. Or, another high school equivalent. And, students who have earned 60 college credits or an Associate’s degree can apply without a GED. 

Admission requirements (for GED applicants) include

  • GED

2019/20 Tuition & Fees

Undergrad Tuition & Fees: $12,336
Grad Tuition & Fees: $11,862 + 270 fees 

Average Amount of Financial Aid (2019/20)

Grants & Awards: 35% get, avg. amt. $4,663

Federal Loans: 23% get, avg. amt. $7,260

Grad Rate

15%

Salary After Attending

$34k – $64k

Colleges that Accept Low GPA

Colleges today use many tools to get to know prospective students, one of which may be your GPA. Or, grade point average. What if you did not do as well as you hoped in high school and have a low GPA? There are colleges that might still accept you.

Here are a few guidelines to understanding how colleges view the GPA. Plus a few helpful hints on how to add value to your application. Despite low GPA scores.

WHAT IS CONSIDERED A LOW GPA?

To know what a ‘low GPA’ is, you need to understand what the GPA is. Then put it into context of the colleges you want to apply to. Most colleges use a point scale of 4.0. So, a grade of A = 4 points, B = 3 points, C = 2 points, D= 1 point and F = zero points. The average of all the points for all the courses you took in high school is your GPA. According to the latest study by the NCES, GPAs have gone up over time. In their last study, they found the national average GPA was 3.0.

If your GPA is less than the national average, you might guess it is a low GPA. And when compared in this way, anything below 3.0 is low. But many colleges do not use the GPA to predict your readiness for college. These schools may not set a GPA you need to get in. Or, they may set their standards at 2.0 or 2.5. In this case, if you have a 2.75 GPA, while lower than others in the US, it may be high for that college.

CAN I GET INTO A GOOD COLLEGE WITH A LOW GPA?

Many colleges accept students with a low GPA if you use 3.0 as the metric.  One reason is the preference for standard test scores. The SAT for example, or ACT. To that point, not every SAT test taker has a high GPA either. The College Board who runs the SAT found that in 2019, almost half of test takers had grades between B through F.

That breaks down as 31% were B students (80 – 89), 10% were C students (70 – 79) and 2% had grades below 70. So, either a D, E, or F. There are also colleges with open admissions policies. Community and vocational schools, for example. These schools might accept anyone with a high school diploma or GED.

A range of colleges also set their lowest acceptable GPA well below the national norm. This can be 2.0 or from 2.5 to 3.0 and varies from one college to the next. If your GPA and SAT or ACT scores are lower than 2.0, do not give up. But, you might have to make sure you stand out in other ways.

1

Southern New Hampshire University

  • Take advantage of some of the nation’s most affordable tuition rates, while earning a degree from a private, nonprofit, NEASC accredited university.
  • Generous transfer policy, accepting up to 90 credits; the university also partners with community colleges for easy transfer..
Sanhu-university

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2

University of Arizona Global Campus

  • Accredited University offering Associate’s, Bachelor’s and Master’s Degrees
  • Affordable tuition, 5-6 week courses, and various payment options
  • 80+ online programs
Ashford University

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HOW TO GET INTO COLLEGE WITH A LOW GPA?

There are a few ways to improve your odds at getting into college, low GPA and all. Here are 5 tips to put into use when you apply.

1. HIGHLIGHT YOUR STRENGTHS

Your GPA may not impress. But your other qualities might make you an ideal option for the colleges on your list.
Both undergrad and graduate schools often look at an applicant from all sides. Things like community service, a part time job, and volunteer work all count.

For example, you won an award or take part in activities outside school. Or have a military background that kept you moving from place to place. Many colleges that accept low GPAs consider life experience instead.

2. HOLISTIC ADMISSIONS

Many colleges do set a GPA standard, but also give options to get around a low one. These schools tend to look at your application (and you) as a package deal. This means they may weigh other things which can help you make up for poor grades. Like your essay, goals, work experience, references and SAT / ACT scores.

Any of these are a perfect opportunity to add depth to your application. And, may help you select schools that strive to see you as a complete person instead of as a sum of your GPA.

3. WRITE A GREAT PERSONAL STATEMENT OR ESSAY

Many colleges want to know who is behind the GPA. As the GPA is a static number, your essay or personal statement can bring it to life. Colleges tend to include specific details to format these things. Desired word count, for instance, or AP style. It is a good idea to stick to their structure as it shows you can read and follow directions. But, you can be creative, positive and even emotional. Describe what you learned and what direction you hope your career will take.

If the reason you got a low GPA taught you something, it might be appropriate to fit it in too. It may point to your strengths and how you’ve matured as a person. Show this side of yourself to the admissions team. Be clear, focused, use spell check and highlight your writing skills.

4. HIGH QUALITY REFERENCES OR LETTERS OF RECOMMENDATION

Many experts agree that high quality references help an application shine. Even if your grades do not. Your letters of recommendation can show attributes. Qualities that the school might miss by looking only at your GPA. References from teachers who watched your progress for example. They might note your poor grades as a freshman and sophomore. Plus, they can describe your effort to improve your GPA as junior or senior. This points to your discipline and commitment.

Employers also make great references as they can point to your work ethic. How you perform in a business setting is also a sign of reliability. If you take any lessons (E.g. piano, karate) also ask coaches, mentors and teachers to write letters. These references can show how you apply feedback and training.

1

Southern New Hampshire University

  • Take advantage of some of the nation’s most affordable tuition rates, while earning a degree from a private, nonprofit, NEASC accredited university
  • Generous transfer policy, accepting up to 90 credits; the university also partners with community colleges for easy transfer.
Sanhu-university

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2

Purdue Global University

  • Competency-based ExcelTrack™ Programs may allow you to earn your degree faster and for less money
  • Experience world-class education online with more than 175 programs at associate’s, bachelor’s, master’s and doctoral levels.
Purdue Global University

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5. SOME SCHOOLS OFFER CONDITIONAL ACCEPTANCE

Some colleges that accept low GPA students offer them conditional acceptance. This means you don’t have a strong enough grades for full acceptance. But they admit you anyway. This type of acceptance tends to come with a few rules you need to abide by. For one, as a student, you must keep up a specific GPA. Or, take a certain number of credits per semester.

Other times, you may need to take basic courses before you enter the program. Then if you meet these conditions, after a certain period of time, many colleges remove them. Take away? If there are colleges you want to apply to, check if they offer conditional acceptance. See what they would want you to do, and think about if you could do it.

Low GPA Colleges

SCHOOLS WITH LOW GPA REQUIREMENTS

A low high school GPA does not have to prevent you from getting into college or grad school. To help you find colleges that accept low GPAs, You may want to check out our list of open admissions colleges. We compiled a list using data from the NCES and College Scorecard. Education Connection does work with some of the schools on this list.

Colleges that accept 1.0 GPA

If you have a very low GPA, these schools with high acceptance rates / open admissions may consider you.

1

Western Governors

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Admission Requirements:

  • Have earned a high school diploma or GED
  • Submit official transcripts of all prior grades completed at community colleges or other colleges you’ve gone to.
  • Be at least 16 years of age
  • Meet any program specific requirements
  • Admission Rate: Open Admission
  • Grad Rate: 70%
  • Average Annual Cost: $13,870
  • Median Salary After Completing: N/A
  • Business
  • Health and Wellness
  • Health Administration 
  • Registered Nursing
  • Criminal Justice
  • Accounting
  • Human Services 

2

Purdue University Global

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Admission Requirements:

  • Completed Enrollment Agreement
  • A completed informational interview (parents or spouses are welcome)
  • Consider a tour of the onsite location and/or online learning environment
  • Attest to certain tech requirements
  • Admission Rate: Open Admission
  • Grad Rate: 63%
  • Average Annual Cost: $8,037
  • Median Salary After Completing : $31,900 to $51,100
  • Business
  • Accounting
  • Human Services
  • Information Science 
  • Communication and Media Studies 

3

Colorado Technical University

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Admission Requirements:

  • Proof of GED or High School Education
  • Interview with an admissions advisor
  • Admission Rate: Open Admission
  • Grad Rate: 29%
  • Average Annual Cost: $7,050
  • Median Salary After Completing: $22,800 to $71,500
  • Business
  • Criminal Justice
  • Nursing
  • Accounting
  • Information Technology

4

University of Arizona Global Campus

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Admission Requirements:

  • Official transcripts
  • Over the age of 22
  • Once enrolled, attain a grade of C- or better by Day 6 of Week 3 in the course
  • Admission Rate: Open Admission
  • Grad Rate: 28%
  • Average Annual Cost: $12,898
  • Median Salary After Completing: $20,300 to $53,700
  • Business 
  • Early Childhood Education and Teaching
  • Health Care Admin
  • Criminal Justice
  • Psychology
  • Behavioral Sciences 

5

Martinsburg College

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Admission Requirements:

  • High school diploma or earned a GED.
  • Complete an admissions interview
  • Admission Rate: 100%
  • Grad Rate: 84%
  • Average Annual Cost: $14,680
  • Median Salary After Completing: N/A
  • Health Administration
  • Medical Assisting
  • Business
  • Homeland Security
  • Accounting

6

Midwest Institute

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Admission Requirements:

  • High school or GED considered but not required
  • Admission Rate: 100%
  • Grad Rate: 90%
  • Average Annual Cost: $22,126
  • Median Salary After Completing: $16,700 to $22,400
  • Dental Assistant
  • Medical Assisting
  • Massage Therapy
  • HVAC

7

Montana State University – Northern

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Admission Requirements:

  • High school or GED considered but not required
  • Admission Rate: 100%
  • Grad Rate: 37%
  • Average Annual Cost: $12,898
  • Median Salary After Completing: $30,300 to $63,300
  • Vehicle Maintenance
  • Registered Nursing
  • Business Admin
  • Criminal Justice

8

Elizabethtown College School of Continuing and Professional Studies

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Admission Requirements:

  • Minimum of three years of full ime work experience.
  • High school diploma or GED.
  • Have writing ability good enough for success in an accelerated academic program.
  • Have the time to devote to your course work.
  • Admission Rate: 100%
  • Grad Rate: 37%
  • Average Annual Cost: $12,898
  • Median Salary After Completing: $30,300 to $63,300
  • Business
  • Accounting
  • Human Services
  • Information Science 
  • Communication and Media Studies 

1

Southern New Hampshire University

  • Take advantage of some of the nation’s most affordable tuition rates, while earning a degree from a private, nonprofit, NEASC accredited university
  • Generous transfer policy, accepting up to 90 credits; the university also partners with community colleges for easy transfer.
Sanhu-university

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2

Purdue Global University

  • Competency-based ExcelTrack™ Programs may allow you to earn your degree faster and for less money
  • Experience world-class education online with more than 175 programs at associate’s, bachelor’s, master’s and doctoral levels.
Purdue Global University

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Colleges that accept 2.0 GPA

Here is a list of colleges that accept a low 2.0 GPA. Some of them may accept you with conditions. While others may set the bar at a GPA of 2.0 to 2.25.

1

Albany State University

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Admission Requirements:

  • 2.0 High School GPA
  • SAT: combined 830 or Critical Reading – 24, Math: 22. Writing is not a factor.
  • ACT Scores: English – 17 & Math – 17
  • Admission Rate: 100%
  • Grad Rate: 29%
  • Average Annual Cost: $11,590
  • Median Salary After Completing: $19,900 to $66,700
  • Liberal Arts
  • RN
  • Criminal Justice
  • Business
  • Education

2

Dallas Nursing Institute

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Admission Requirements:

  • 2.0 GPA
  • Complete application form
  • Non refundable application fee
  • Official transcript of all high school credits, or, GED as well as any college attended
  • Be at least 17 years of age (in accordance with Texas laws, if under 18, a parent or legal guardian signature is required prior to enrollment)
  • Admission Rate: 11%
  • Grad Rate: 59%
  • Average Annual Cost: $21,319
  • Median Salary After Completing: $51,400 to $58,200
  • Registered Nursing

3

Family of Faith Christian University

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Admission Requirements:

  • 2.0 GPA
  • Applicants for a four year program must take the ACT or SAT and have a minimum composite score of 20 for the ACT and 720 for the SAT.
  • Admission Rate: 80%
  • Grad Rate: 38%
  • Average Annual Cost: $11,548
  • Median Salary After Completing: N/A

4

Fort Hays State University

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Admission Requirements:

  • 2.0 GPA
  • ACT composite score of 21 or above OR SAT score 980 or above for tests taken before March 2016 or SAT score 1080 or above for tests taken March 2016 or after
  • Admission Rate: 89%
  • Grad Rate: 63%
  • Average Annual Cost: $12,376
  • Median Salary After Completing: $27,000 to $57,700
  • Business
  • Liberal Arts
  • Education
  • Nursing
  • Psychology

5

Gwynedd Mercy University

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Admission Requirements:

  • 2.0 GPA
  • Complete the online Admissions application
  • Submit SAT or ACT Scores 
  • Submit an official transcript from each of the high schools, colleges you have attended
  • Admission Rate: 94%
  • Grad Rate: 54%
  • Average Annual Cost: $23,564
  • Median Salary After Completing: $28,000 to $70,400
  • Nursing
  • Business
  • Education
  • Criminal Justice
  • Psychology

6

Lewis – Clark State College

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Admission Requirements:

  • 2.0 GPA
  • Fill out application.
  • Send a copy of your passport. 
  • Send official school records from each of the high schools and colleges,you have attended
  • Admission Rate: 100%
  • Grad Rate: 39%
  • Average Annual Cost: $11,152
  • Median Salary After Completing: $19,700 to $64,000
  • Liberal Arts
  • Nursing
  • Business
  • Health and Physical Education
  • Education

1

Southern New Hampshire University

  • Take advantage of some of the nation’s most affordable tuition rates, while earning a degree from a private, nonprofit, NEASC accredited university.
  • Generous transfer policy, accepting up to 90 credits; the university also partners with community colleges for easy transfer..
Sanhu-university

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2

University of Arizona Global Campus

  • Accredited University offering Associate’s, Bachelor’s and Master’s Degrees
  • Affordable tuition, 5-6 week courses, and various payment options
  • 80+ online programs
Ashford University

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7

Medaille College

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Admission Requirements:

  • 2.0 GPA
  • Application for admission
  • Proof of high school graduation or GED certificate
  • Submission of official transcripts from all colleges attended
  • An applicant with deficiencies in some of these areas may be offered admission with appropriate evidence supporting the student’s ability to succeed
  • Admission Rate: 75%
  • Grad Rate: 37%
  • Average Annual Cost: $11,664
  • Median Salary After Completing: $27,500 to $35,500
  • Medical Assisting
  • Business
  • Psychology
  • Biology
  • Criminal Justice

8

North Carolina State University at Raleigh

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Admission Requirements:

  • 2.0 GPA
  • Application for admission
  • Proof of high school diploma or GED certificate
  • Official transcripts from all colleges attended
  • An applicant with poor grades may be offered admission with appropriate evidence supporting the student’s ability to succeed
  • Admission Rate: 51%
  • Grad Rate: 77%
  • Average Annual Cost: $15,024
  • Median Salary After Completing: $19,100 to $69,800
  • Business
  • Textile Sciences
  • Biology
  • Communication and Media Studies
  • Electrical, Electronics and Communications Engineering

9

Texas A & M International University

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Admission Requirements:

  • 2.0 GPA
  • Complete Application for Admission.
  • Official High School Transcript showing rank in class or official GED passing scores.
  • Official college transcripts sent directly from each ichool attended. If any college credit has been earned. A minimum overall grade point average of 2.00 is required.    
  • Admission Rate: 50%
  • Grad Rate: 50%
  • Average Annual Cost: $4,884
  • Median Salary After Completing: $19,800 to $64,200
  • Criminal Justice
  • Psychology
  • Business
  • Interdisciplinary Studies
  • Nursing

10

University of Houston – Clear Lake

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Admission Requirements:

  • 2.0 GPA
  • Submit Application
  • Send Transcripts
  • Send your SAT and ACT scores
  • Admission Rate: 72%
  • Grad Rate: 73%
  • Average Annual Cost: $13,055
  • Median Salary After Completing: $30,200 to $48,500
  • Interdisciplinary Studies
  • Psychology
  • Accounting
  • Business
  • Health and Physical Education

11

University of Maine

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Admission Requirements:

  • 2.0 GPA
  • Essay
  • Final high school transcript or HISET or GED
  • SAT or ACT Test Scores
  • Admission Rate: 92%
  • Grad Rate: 59%
  • Average Annual Cost: $17,074
  • Median Salary After Completing: $23,300 to $68,400
  • Business
  • Mechanical Engineering
  • Education
  • Psychology
  • Finance

12

University of Maine at Fort Kent

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Admission Requirements:

  • 2.0 GPA
  • Completed application form
  • School Counselor (or teacher) letter of recommendation (If you are a current high school graduate)
  • Official high school transcripts or official GED score report
  • Official college transcripts (if you completed any college work)
  • Admission Rate: 97%
  • Grad Rate: 54%
  • Average Annual Cost: $12,228
  • Median Salary After Completing: N/A
  • Nursing
  • Business
  • Criminal Justice
  • Forestry
  • Social Sciences

13

West Texas A & M University

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Admission Requirements:

  • 2.0 GPA
  • One of the following Class Rank & ACT / SAT Score combos:
    Top 25% with no minimum ACT/SAT score
    26%-50% with 18 ACT or 960 SAT
    51%-75% with 21 ACT or 1060
    SAT 76%-100% with 23 ACT or 1130 SAT
  • Students may also be admitted solely on test scores* if they achieve the following scores:
    Official SAT Scores: at least 480 for EBRW and 530 for Math
    Official ACT scores: at least 18 English, 22 Reading, 22 Mathematics and 23 Science
  • Admission Rate: 61%
  • Grad Rate: 50%
  • Average Annual Cost: $14,916
  • Median Salary After Completing: $23,900 to $70,600
  • Nursing
  • Business
  • Criminal Justice
  • Forestry
  • Social Sciences

1

Southern New Hampshire University

  • Take advantage of some of the nation’s most affordable tuition rates, while earning a degree from a private, nonprofit, NEASC accredited university
  • Generous transfer policy, accepting up to 90 credits; the university also partners with community colleges for easy transfer.
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2

Purdue Global University

  • Competency-based ExcelTrack™ Programs may allow you to earn your degree faster and for less money
  • Experience world-class education online with more than 175 programs at associate’s, bachelor’s, master’s and doctoral levels.
Purdue Global University

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Colleges that accept 2.5 GPA

These seven colleges may accept low 2.5 GPAs

1

ECPI University

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Admission Requirements:

  • Students must have a GPA of 2.5 or higher on a four point scale.
  • Transfers are accepted by ECPI University into a specific program that aligns with the VCCS’s associate’s degree program.
  • Admission Rate: 71%
  • Grad Rate: 52%
  • Average Annual Cost: $20,327
  • Median Salary After Completing: $16,800 to $67,100
  • Medical Assisting
  • Nursing Assistant
  • Nursing
  • Information Technology
  • Culinary Arts

2

Embry – Riddle Aeronautical University Worldwide

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Admission Requirements:

Applicants age 20 and older who are not classified as a transfer student or have not served in the US military must provide the following:

  • Official high school transcript or equivalent (GED®, HiSET® or TASC®) with a 2.5 unweighted GPA or higher on a 4.0 scale
  • Official transcripts from all colleges attended, with a minimum of a 2.0 CGPA on a 4.0 scale
  • Resume
  • Admission Rate: 63%
  • Grad Rate: 33%
  • Average Annual Cost: $19,648
  • Median Salary After Completing: $37,500 to $62,500
  • Air Transportation
  • Business Administration
  • Vehicle Maintenance
  • Mechanical Engineering
  • Homeland Security

3

Endicott College

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Admission Requirements:

  • Review by an Admission Committee
  • a GPA of at least 2.5
  • Admission Rate: 81%
  • Grad Rate: 72%
  • Average Annual Cost: $34,571
  • Median Salary After Completing: $28,800 to $66,400
  • Nursing
  • Business
  • Health and Physical Education
  • Hospitality
  • Education

4

Grace Christian University

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Admission Requirements:

  • Holistic Admission Process
  • 20 ACT OR 940 SAT
  • 2.5 GPA
  • Admission Rate: 81%
  • Grad Rate: 72%
  • Average Annual Cost: $34,571
  • Median Salary After Completing: N/A
  • Pastoral Counseling
  • Human Services
  • Business
  • Bible Studies
  • Music

5

University of Southern Indiana

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Admission Requirements:

  • GPA of 2.5 on a 4.0 scale
  • Students age 24+ must have had a 2.0 cumulative high school GPA
  • Composite SAT score of a 900 OR Composite ACT score of a 17
  • Students age 21+ are not required to submit an SAT or ACT score
  • Admission Rate: 94%
  • Grad Rate: 44%
  • Average Annual Cost: $13,319
  • Median Salary After Completing: $22,700 to $61,400
  • Nursing
  • Health Administration
  • Business
  • Education
  • Health and Physical Education

6

Southern New Hampshire University

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Admission Requirements:

  • Completed Application 
  • Transcript Release
  • Electronic Attestation Form, stating that you’ve graduated from high school or received your GED
  • Admission Rate: 78%
  • Grad Rate: 69%
  • Average Annual Cost: $40,617
  • Median Salary After Completing: $25,700 to $71,500
  • Business
  • Psychology
  • Liberal Arts
  • Nursing
  • Accounting

7

Grand Canyon University

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Admission Requirements:

  • High school graduate with an unweighted GPA of 2.5 or above
  • ACT composite score of 19 or above, or combined Math and Critical Reading SAT score of 1000
  • Admission Rate: 67%
  • Grad Rate: 32%
  • Average Annual Cost: $20,570
  • Median Salary After Completing: $25,400 to $75,400
  • Nursing
  • Special Education
  • Business
  • Education
  • Human Services

1

Southern New Hampshire University

  • Take advantage of some of the nation’s most affordable tuition rates, while earning a degree from a private, nonprofit, NEASC accredited university
  • Generous transfer policy, accepting up to 90 credits; the university also partners with community colleges for easy transfer.
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2

Purdue Global University

  • Competency-based ExcelTrack™ Programs may allow you to earn your degree faster and for less money
  • Experience world-class education online with more than 175 programs at associate’s, bachelor’s, master’s and doctoral levels.
Purdue Global University

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Colleges that accept 3.0 GPA

Here are some examples of colleges that accept students with a 3.0 GPA and above.

1

Bloomsburg University of Pennsylvania

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Admission Requirements:

  • 3.0 GPA
  • Completed college prep curriculum in high school
  • Average test score: SAT: 1050-1090; ACT: 23 (Nursing: 1180 SAT, 24 ACT)
  • Top 30% of graduating class
  • Active in high school, community, and leadership activities
  • Admission Rate: 73%
  • Grad Rate: 64%
  • Average Annual Cost: $18,796
  • Median Salary After Completing: $19,800 to $66,500
  • Business
  • Criminal Justice
  • Public Relations
  • Nursing
  • Psychology

2

Lamar University

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Admission Requirements:

  • 3.5 GPA
  • Top 25% of class
  • SAT Scores: Critical Reading: 480 – 580, Math: 470 – 560
  • ACT: 18 – 23
  • Admission Rate: 82%
  • Grad Rate: 39%
  • Average Annual Cost: $12,941
  • Median Salary After Completing: $25,000 to $68,800
  • Nursing
  • Interdisciplinary Studies
  • Liberal Arts
  • Criminal Justice
  • Communication

3

Mesivtha Tifereth Jerusalem of America

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Admission Requirements:

  • 3.5 GPA
  • Top 25% of class
  • SAT Scores: Critical Reading: 480 – 580, Math: 470 – 560
  • ACT: 18 – 23
  • Admission Rate: 82%
  • Grad Rate: 39%
  • Average Annual Cost: $12,941
  • Median Salary After Completing: $25,000 to $68,800
  • Nursing
  • Interdisciplinary Studies
  • Liberal Arts
  • Criminal Justice
  • Communication

4

The College of Westchester

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Admission Requirements:

  • 3.0 GPA
  • Completed college prep curriculum in high school
  • Acceptance Rate: 98%
  • Grad Rate: 44%
  • Average Annual Cost: $17,237
  • Median Salary After Completing: $12,200 to $36,500
  • Business
  • Medical Assisting
  • Health and Medical Administration
  • Information Technology

5

University of Minnesota – Twin Cities

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Admission Requirements:

  • A minimum GPA of 3.0 for transfer student
  • Completed, or in progress, 26 or more post-secondary credits.
  • Acceptance Rate: 50%
  • Grad Rate: 79%
  • Average Annual Cost: $17,396
  • Median Salary After Completing: $17,300 to $71,000
  • Psychology
  • Economic
  • Computer Science
  • Biology
  • Journalism

Sponsored Schools

The Digital Divide: What it is and How it Impacts us

What is Digital Divide?

“Digital divide” refers to the gap between those who have access to ICTs and those who don’t. ICTs are information and communication technologies that drive access to knowledge.
While the term “digital divide” came into play in the mid 1990’s, it is still a hot button public policy debate. Above all since it touches on social, political and economic issues.

Check out the infographic below to learn more.

1

Southern New Hampshire University

  • Take advantage of some of the nation’s most affordable tuition rates, while earning a degree from a private, nonprofit, NEASC accredited university
  • Generous transfer policy, accepting up to 90 credits; the university also partners with community colleges for easy transfer.
Sanhu-university

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2

Purdue Global University

  • Competency-based ExcelTrack™ Programs may allow you to earn your degree faster and for less money
  • Experience world-class education online with more than 175 programs at associate’s, bachelor’s, master’s and doctoral levels.
Purdue Global University

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digital divide infographic

Want to use this Digital Divide infographic on your site? Just use the code below!

Where does the Digital Divide exist?

The digital divide exists in a deeper way among low income groups and communities. So, it is both a local issue and one that underdeveloped countries around the globe face. There is also a global digital divide between genders and users. In all regions of the world, more men (58%)  than women are using the Internet. The gap is small in developed countries and large in developing countries.

So why does the Digital Divide exist? Well, many low income students do not have the ability to a desktop or laptop. Or, they can get the technology but cannot afford Internet (let alone high speed).

Are virtual schools widening the Digital Divide?

Virtual schools are widening the Digital Divide as you need both technology and Internet to enroll. One result is what is called a “homework gap”. This is the gap between school-age children who have access to high-speed internet at home and those who don’t.

Pew Research Data from 2018 shows that almost 1 in 5 school age children face this issue. And some are more likely than others to face digital hurdles when they try to do their homework. Not completing homework may then lead to poorer grades. Teachers say this this may also lead to delinquency.

How does COVID-19 impact the Digital Divide?

COVID-19 impacts the Digital Divide as it mandates schools deliver courses online. Without reliable access to virtual classrooms, many students cannot take part in remote lessons etc. This means the homework gap is worse. As schools close, they shift to web instruction. Unfortunately, cable or DSL internet is not available for some students who live in more rural areas.

According to the Federal Communications Commission (FCC), at least 25 million people do not have broadband. And out of this group, 19 million live in rural areas. And, those who do have data plans may not be able to afford the extra cost that goes with all the usage. An average plan likely won’t cover a whole school day, plus homework, plus social media time etc.

How are students overcoming the problem?

To overcome this problem is a huge challenge. Some charities and schools are lending or giving out laptops and tablets. And some principals are trying to find hotspots that people who don’t have Internet can use. Some students also for their smart phones. Then if their family has a hotspot, use that.

There are also stories of students who drive to a parking lot near a library to use their public WIFI. Yet not all students can even do this. So, some schools send packets of materials to students or DVDs. Then the parents take a picture of a completed assignment and email it to the teachers.

How does the Digital Divide affect people?

One impact of the Digital Divide is that it limits opportunity to those with restricted access to IT. Residents without internet may struggle to access government services, locate public amenities, telework, or turn in their homework. According to Pew Research data, higher income Americans do not face such limits. They are more likely to have many devices that enable them to go online. About two-thirds (64%) have home broadband / Internet, a smartphone, a desktop or laptop computer and a tablet.

On the other side of the divide, only 18% of those living in lower-income households have this kind of access. As a result, many Americans who earn less than $30,000 rely on smartphones for things like job search. Another impact of the divide is that it may leave people without a way to build key computer skills. In 40 out of 84 countries for which data are available, less than half the population has basic computer skills. For instance, they don’t know how to such as copy a file or send an e‑mail with an attachment.

How could the Digital Divide be bridged?

One way to bridge the Digital Divide is through Digital Inclusion which sets up Smart Cities. In spite of how complex the issues, some Smart Cities are trying to ensure access through infrastructure. Some are making an effort to set up public Wi-Fi networks. And other cities are finding innovative ways to get internet coverage to those who lack assess.

One example launched by G3ict and World Enabled is the Smart Cities for All initiative. It was set up to define the state of ICT accessibility in Smart Cities worldwide. The goal of their plan is to eliminate the digital divide for the elderly and persons with disabilities in Smart Cities around the world. To do this, they are partnering with leading organizations and companies. Then, working to create and deploy the tools and tactics needed to build more inclusive Smart Cities.

Google sister company, Sidewalk Labs is also trying to come up with a solution, albeit for those who can afford it. Their plan is to build a tech loaded community called Quayside on the waterfront in Toronto, Canada. In Quayside, they plan to embed all sorts of sensors everywhere they can. As a result, there will be a constant stream of data about many things. Like traffic flow, noise levels, air quality, energy usage, travel patterns, and waste output. 

This type of community shows that smart tech sensors can be useful. Cityblock, another spinoff of Sidewalk Labs is focusing on low income communities with serious health problems. Their vision includes an option for members to join a “neighborhood health hub.”

Has there been any government support to bridge the divide?

Advocates and government workers in the broadband and digital equity space report a renewed interest in bridging the divide. One of the reasons is that COVID-19 highlights the unequal access to IT that has long existed. It also shows us just how reliant on the Internet we are. Telehealth visits, for instance, are only available to those with access. So, many older adults and underserved communities are among the hardest hit. A state with a plan is Maine. Maine lawmakers recently approved a bond package with $15 million to expand broadband in the state.

But changes at the federal level are also called for. And one effort took place in a hearing in January 2020. It took place within the Subcommittee on Communications and Technology of the Committee on Energy and Commerce. They dubbed it the “Empowering and Connecting Communities through Digital Equity and Internet Adoption.”

The hearing focused on broadband. Broadband is neither a utility nor regulated in the same way the government does utilities like phone service. As a result, private companies not linked with public interest may want the divide to grow, not shrink.

Online Christian Colleges

20 Online Christian Colleges for 2020 

Explore Online Christian Colleges that could help you grow in your religious beliefs.

What is an Online Christian College?

An Online Christian college is a school that blends Christian values and traditional academics. You could study the same subjects taught at other colleges. But with a major difference. Courses in an Online Christian college are taught from a Christian viewpoint. In a Christian college, you may have the chance to prepare for your future through a biblical lens. That means you could learn how Christianity informs fields like philosophy, science, and the arts. You could get involved in clubs and activities that weave in faith. And you could study with classmates who share your spiritual beliefs.

What Will I Learn in an Online Christian College?

Christian colleges may teach much of the same coursework as other schools. Like, math, science, and liberal arts courses. And, they award the same degrees. Like, Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science degrees. The main difference is that you’ll apply Christian values to your general studies.

For instance, a biology major at an Online Christian college could expect to study botany, genetics, ecology, and more. An organizational leadership major could study business and finance. Pretty much the same as a secular student. The difference is that at an Online Christian college, faith informs these subjects. In a biology program, that could mean looking at topics like Creationism. Or, the meaning of life. Along with secular scientific views, you could give serious attention to biblical views.

Courses in theology and scripture are also the norm. Yes, secular colleges may have courses on world religions. But in a Christian college, you’ll likely take several required courses about your faith. And, you may have access to different majors. Like:

  • Christian ministry
  • Christian education
  • Biblical studies
  • Theological studies

Learning goals at an Online Christian college could include:

  • Gaining a better understanding of the Bible
  • Handling moral dilemmas in your life and career
  • Defining and building a Christian character
  • Serving others in your career, home, and community
  • Weaving your faith into your life and work
  • Navigating the secular world and the challenges it brings

Online colleges are often much the same. In some cases, online programs at a Christian college have a curriculum that’s the same as traditional programs at the same school. In other cases, the online program may have slight changes. Like, fewer theology courses. But, you’ll likely still touch on topics like the Bible and living a Christian life. And your online courses in any subject could factor in faith. Choosing online education may not change what you learn.  

Is an Online Christian College Perfect for You?

If you are hoping to explore your faith along with your academic major, a Christian college may be ideal! Let’s review some pros and cons.

Potential Pros to Choosing an Online Christian College

  • You could learn more about your faith. It’s always possible to be a better informed Christian. At a Christian or Bible college, you might learn to gain more meaning from scripture. You could deepen your knowledge of Christian life. After all, the way you practiced faith in high school may need to evolve as you get older. College could help you learn to follow Christ into adulthood.
  • You could bring faith to your field. Wondering how Christian views could inform your academic major? Choosing a Christian college may bring the chance to ask questions rooted in faith. At a secular college, you may not be able to study biblical views on subjects like chemistry or criminal justice.
  • You could find community. The faculty, staff, and students will likely share your Christian faith. You may worship together, volunteer together, and support each other. And, you could learn from diverse Christian viewpoints.
  • You could prepare for the life you want to live. If you aren’t sure how to blend faith and your career, going to a Christian college could shed some light. You could learn how to live your values on the job. And how to serve others in a godly way.

Potential Cons to Choosing a Christian College

  • It may ask a lot of your faith. Many Christian colleges ask for a deep commitment. You may need to attend regular chapel or bible study. For many students, that’s a plus. But if you practice your faith more casually, that might not be the perfect fit.
  • There’s the potential for less diversity. College can be a great time to learn about other world views. You’ll find plenty of different opinions at a Christian college. Many Bible colleges are nondenominational. Or interdenominational. So Lutheran students could study with Presbyterian or Nazarene students, etc. But, the school may not have as much diversity as a public college.
  • Faculty and students may hold conservative views. There are Christians across the political spectrum. Some take a conservative stance on many issues. If that doesn’t describe you, ask whether the Christian college you’re considering is the ideal fit.
  • Online degree programs bring faith to the web. For many, that’s great news. You could strengthen your faith from the comfort of home. But, if you’re not as tech savvy, you may find it hard to get used to some things. Like virtual prayer meetings.

1

Southern New Hampshire University

  • Take advantage of some of the nation’s most affordable tuition rates, while earning a degree from a private, nonprofit, NEASC accredited university.
  • Generous transfer policy, accepting up to 90 credits; the university also partners with community colleges for easy transfer..
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2

University of Arizona Global Campus

  • Accredited University offering Associate’s, Bachelor’s and Master’s Degrees
  • Affordable tuition, 5-6 week courses, and various payment options
  • 80+ online programs
Ashford University

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Professional Organizations for Christian College Students

After earning an online degree from a Christian college, you may want to join a professional org. This may be a great way to seek support in your field. Here are a few to consider:

Accreditation for Christian Colleges

Several organizations accredit Christian colleges. These include: 

Scholarships for Christian Colleges

  • Colorado Christian Scripture Memory Scholarships. To qualify, you must memorize a full book from the Bible. Scholarship amounts vary by the book you choose. The highest you could earn is $4,400, for Matthew. You must be a CCU student to enter. The deadline varies
  • Dr. James Earl Massey Intercultural Leadership Scholarship. This is for freshmen students at Anderson University. You must show that you have served God and bridged cultural divides in your community. Entrants could qualify for $2,000-$4,000 a year. Deadline varies.
  • Lettie Pate Whitehead Scholarship Program. This program grants money to female Christian students. They must live in select southern states. Most funds go to undergraduate programs and health education. Amounts and deadline vary.  
  • Mary E. Bivins Foundation Scholarships. This program helps to educate Christian ministers. You must pursue a Bachelor’s degree or Master’s degree. And, you must prepare to preach the Christian faith. Program is open to those in the Texas Panhandle. Amounts vary. The highest award, $7,000, is for grad students. Deadline is January 2021. 
  • The Christian Missionary Scholarship Foundation. This foundation helps children of missionaries. Missionary families may make financial sacrifices. So, they can’t always afford college. Each year, this program helps 100 missionary kids at six Christian colleges. The next deadline is in February 2021. Awards vary. 
  • Hubler Endowed Scholarship. This is for ministry students at Baylor University. You could receive $5,000 per semester for Spring and Fall. Students need to have a divine call for vocational ministry. They must also have a GPA of 3.25. And, other guidelines apply. Next yearly deadline is March 15. 
  • Gordon and Eleanor Spykman Memorial Scholarship. This is for juniors or seniors at Calvin University. You must have a major or minor in religion and theology. And, other rules apply. The award is $2,000. Next deadline is in February 2021. 
  • Houghton College Wesleyan Scholarships. This funding is award to Houghton College students who go to the Wesleyan Church. Awards vary. General grants are $1,500 per year. But, those pursuing a pastorate in the Church could receive $5,000 per year. 

20 Christian Colleges 

Using data from the NCES and College Scorecard we have created a list of the top 2020 Christian Colleges in the US. These schools were ranked based on the number of total enrolled students for the 2018 / 2019 school year.

1 Liberty University 
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Based in Lynchburg, Virginia, Liberty is a large, Evangelical Christian university. It offers over 700 programs from the certificate to the doctoral level. These are rooted in the liberal arts. The school is also known for its online degree programs. It strives to be one of the best online Christian colleges. Liberty began offering distance education degree options way back in 1985.  

Liberty University strives to train “champions for Christ.” With a focus on faith and service, every student is called on to worship. All students attend regular convocations. They gather (or watch online) as guest speakers talk about faith and other topics.

2019/20 Tuition & Fees

Undergrad: $22,747 

2018/19 Financial Aid

$11,369

Grad Rate

47%

Salary After Attending

$15K – $67K

2 Columbia College 
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Columbia College is a private institution joined with the Disciples of Christ. It’s based in Columbia, Missouri. And has over 30 other locations to choose from. Evening and online degree programs are also available. The school offers 10 Associate’s degree programs and over 30 Bachelor’s degree programs. Plus, 8 Master’s degree programs.  

CC was founded in 1851 as Christian Female College. Today, it’s coed but keeps its Christian ties. Students can choose from Christian groups, too. Like, Chi Alpha Christian Fellowship. CC is nonsectarian. And, students of all faiths are welcome. 

2019/20 Tuition & Fees

Undergrad: $23,498

2018/19 Financial Aid

$11,356

Grad Rate

18%

Salary After Attending

$84K

3 Indiana Wesleyan University 
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Indiana Wesleyan is a Christian comprehensive university of the Wesleyan Church. It is based in Marion, Indiana. It is the largest member of the Council for Christian Colleges and Universities. Along with traditional programs, it offers adult ed and online learning. 

IWU’s goal is to be a Christ centered community. Students from all faith backgrounds can attend. But, Christian ideas are woven into every area of student life. Service and fellowship are a big part of that experience.  

2019/20 Tuition & Fees

Undergrad: $9,743

2018/19 Financial Aid

$5,983

Grad Rate

38%

Salary After Attending

$27k – $62k

4 Duke University 
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Duke is a top research university in Durham, NC. It has ties with the United Methodist church. Duke serves 15,634 learners in undergrad, grad, and professional programs. Students come from around the world to attend. 

At the graduate level, Duke is home to a Divinity School. Its students seek to answer God’s call to serve. Seven grad programs are available. Like, a Master of Divinity (M.Div.) program.  

2019/20 Tuition & Fees

Undergrad: $58,031 

2018/19 Financial Aid

$50,719

Grad Rate

95%

Salary After Attending

$32k – $100k

5 Baylor University 
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Baylor is a Baptist, doctoral university. It is based in Waco, Texas and serves 16,000 students. Students benefit from chances to do inter disciplinary research. Choose from over 127 undergraduate degree programs. Plus, many grad degree programs.  

Baylor’s mission is to prepare students for leadership and service. Christian values are at the center of it all. Chapel is a chance for students and faculty to gather two days per week. Baylor is also home to the George W. Truett Theological Seminary. While Baylor is a Baptist college, students from all faiths are welcome. 

2019/20 Tuition & Fees

Undergrad: $47,364

2018/19 Financial Aid

$24,559

Grad Rate

78%

Salary After Attending

$17k – $76k

6 Emory University 
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Emory is a private, doctoral research university. Based in Atlanta, it is tied to the United Methodist Church. Emory is known for its liberal arts colleges. And, its health care degree programs and leading health care system.  

At Emory, there are many ways to practice your faith. Christian orgs on campus offer various services and ministries. While Emory is Methodist, other denominations are represented. The Candler School of Theology at Emory is one of 13 United Methodist seminaries. 

2019/20 Tuition & Fees

Undergrad: $53,804

2018/19 Financial Aid

$43,560

Grad Rate

90%

Salary After Attending

$17k – $79k

7 American University 
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Based in Washington, D.C., American is a well known research university. It is a United Methodist school. AU serves over 14,000 students. And, it offers 71 Bachelor’s, 87 Master’s, and 10 doctoral degree programs. Including distance learning. 

AU strives to live up to its Methodist values. You can do just that at the Kay Spiritual Life Center. Kay offers many ways to practice your faith. Like, chapel and service projects. The school also offers degree programs in Religion, Religious Studies, and more.  

2019/20 Tuition & Fees

Undergrad: $49,889

2018/19 Financial Aid

$25,603

Grad Rate

79%

Salary After Attending

$24k – $51k

8 Azusa Pacific University 
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Azusa Pacific is a doctoral research university in California. It is a Christian institution. But, it is undenominational. Its focus is on preparing students to serve the world for Christ. Choose from a range of undergrad and grad programs. Plus, online degree programs for distance learners. 

Azusa Pacific is a Christ centered school. It brings together faith and learning. So, all academic majors include religion in the curriculum. Faculty and staff are Christian. And, students can practice their faith through chapel, service, mission trips, and more. 

2019/20 Tuition & Fees

Undergrad: $40,220

2018/19 Financial Aid

$25,579

Grad Rate

68%

Salary After Attending

$19k – $87k

9 Southern Methodist University 
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Southern Methodist is a doctoral research university. It teaches in the liberal arts tradition. SMU serves over 12,000 students, some from around the world. Based in Dallas, the school is at the heart of culture and cutting edge research. 

SMU is nonsectarian, and all faiths are welcome. There are plenty of ways for Christian students to get involved. That includes Wednesday Worship, a weekly Christian service. The Office of the Chaplain and Religious Life offers spiritual guidance. 

2019/20 Tuition & Fees

Undergrad: $56,560

2018/19 Financial Aid

$34,084

Grad Rate

81%

Salary After Attending

$18k – $72k

10 Texas Christian University 
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Texas Christian is a private, doctoral university in Forth Worth. It has ties with the Christian Church. Offering a 295 acre urban campus, it’s right in the heart of culture. TCU serves 9,445 undergrad students, plus grad students. 

TCU is the largest of 21 schools that has a covenant with the Disciples of Christ. This is a protestant denomination. It has Presbyterian and Baptist roots. That said, students of all faiths attend TCU.  

2019/20 Tuition & Fees

Undergrad: $49,250

2018/19 Financial Aid

$27,906

Grad Rate

23%

Salary After Attending

$35k – $45k

11 Wayland Baptist University 
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Wayland Baptist is a private, Southern Baptist university. It is based in Plainview, Texas. Choose from over 65 programs, with a liberal arts focus. The school serves over 1,400 students. Plus, 3,600 students on 13 other campuses. These are located across the Southwest. And, in Hawaii, and Alaska.  

Education at Wayland has a Christian world view. That means you’ll study in a Christian setting and prepare to serve God in your work and life. There are many ways to get involved – like the Baptist Student Ministry. Or the Fellowship of Christian Athletes (FCA). 

2019/20 Tuition & Fees

Undergrad: $22,658

2018/19 Financial Aid

$7,974

Grad Rate

23%

Salary After Attending

$35k – $45k

12 California Baptist University 
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CBU is a private, Southern Baptist university. It calls Riverside, California home. The school offers over offers more than 80 undergraduate student majors. From business administration to the sciences. Plus, choose from 30 master’s degree programs and 5 doctoral programs. 

As a Christ centered school, CBU integrates faith into academics and social activities. CBU offers many ways to serve God and others. These range from service projects to inter national programs.  

2019/20 Tuition & Fees

Undergrad: $34,882

2018/19 Financial Aid

$23,267

Grad Rate

63%

Salary After Attending

$23k-81k

13 Chapman University 
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Chapman is a private university in Orange, California. You’ll find it just 15 miles from the beach. Founded in 1861, it is linked with the Disciples of Christ. Chapman serves around 10,000 learners. It’s proud of its diverse student body.  

Chapman has Christian roots, but you don’t have to be Christian to go here. The Fish Interfaith Center serves everyone. It offers a wealth of ways to enrich your spiritual life. There are also many Christian groups on campus. Like, Campus Crusade for Christ. And YoungLife. And InterVarsity Christian Fellowship.  

2019/20 Tuition & Fees

Undergrad: $54,924

2018/19 Financial Aid

$28,341

Grad Rate

81%

Salary After Attending

$15k – $61k

14 Bethel University 
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Bethel is a comprehensive Christian school. This private university is based in McKenzie, Tennessee. It offers 100 academic programs in two colleges. Plus, a school for graduate studies. And a seminary. Bethel has Cumberland Presbyterian ties. But, it is interdenominational.  

Faith is at the center of living and learning at Bethel. As a student, you can take part in chapel, evening vespers, and more. The Office of Campus Ministries supports students as they explore their beliefs. And, there are many service and outreach programs.  

2019/20 Tuition & Fees

Undergrad: $17,010

2018/19 Financial Aid

$15,302

Grad Rate

32%

Salary After Attending

$40k – $50k

15 Concordia University-Wisconsin 
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Concordia University in Wisconsin is a private, doctoral school. Campus is located next to Lake Michigan and is noted as the safest in Wisconsin. (In school rankings.) It offers over 70 majors and programs across 6 schools.  

Concordia University in Wisconsin is a private, doctoral school. Campus is located next to Lake Michigan and is noted as the safest in Wisconsin. (In school rankings.) It offers over 70 majors and programs across 6 schools.  

2019/20 Tuition & Fees

Undergrad: $30,352

2018/19 Financial Aid

$19,324

Grad Rate

64%

Salary After Attending

$14k – $60k

16 Pepperdine University 
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Pepperdine is a private, doctoral university in Malibu, CA. It is tied to Churches of Christ. The school offers 73 education programs across 5 undergrad and grad schools. Located just 35 miles from LA, its in an ideal location for fun, sun, and culture. 

Over half of the students at Pepperdine are Christian. The rest come from other faith backgrounds. Pepperdine values diversity but is built on Christian values. Service, worship, and learning come together at this school. Every undergrad dorm has a Spiritual Life Advisor.  

2019/20 Tuition & Fees

Undergrad: $55,892

2018/19 Financial Aid

$30,867

Grad Rate

86%

Salary After Attending

$26k – $62k

17 Ashland University 
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Based in Ashland, Ohio, this university has ties to the Brethren Church. It was founded in 1878. Today, it serves over 6,600 students – each one valued as an individual. Choose from traditional or online degree programs.  

Ashland is guided in all things by its Christian heritage. Faith in God and Christian values are key to its identity. The Office of Christian Ministry offers many ways to worship, serve, and grow in your faith. This school is also home to the Ashland Theological Seminary. 

2019/20 Tuition & Fees

Undergrad: $21,980

2018/19 Financial Aid

$13,485

Grad Rate

65%

Salary After Attending

$22k – $56k

18 Belmont University 
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Belmont is a private, doctoral university in Nashville. It has Baptist heritage but is inter denominational. Belmont focuses on liberal arts and professional education. It serves over 8,400 students in more than 130 programs of study. 

Belmont provides a student centered Christian community. In fact, it is the largest ecumenical Christian college in the United States. Faculty and staff try to include Christian ways of thinking in every part of life at Belmont. There are many ways to get involved. From worship services to mission trips.  

2019/20 Tuition & Fees

Undergrad: $35,650

2018/19 Financial Aid

$15,784

Grad Rate

72%

Salary After Attending

$20k – $55k

19 Colorado Christian University 
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CCU is a private university based in Lakewood, Colorado. In fact, it is the state’s flagship Christian university. CCU is inter / un denominational. And, it is evangelical. Besides its main campus, the school has centers in six cities throughout CO. And, it offers online learning.  

Colorado Christian does not separate faith and learning. All faculty and staff embrace the school’s Statement of Faith. Chapel attendance is required for all undergrad students. It’s a chance for the whole campus to worship together. And, students must sign a Lifestyle Covenant. 

2019/20 Tuition & Fees

Undergrad: $33,434

2018/19 Financial Aid

$19,049

Grad Rate

55%

Salary After Attending

$29k – $62k

20 Campbell University 
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Campbell University is a private, Baptist college. It was founded by the Baptist minister J.A. Campbell in 1887. You’ll find this school in Buies Creek, NC. It serves 6,800 students in an inclusive Christian setting. 

Students can take part in worship at the beautiful Butler Chapel. Ministries and mission trips offer ways to serve others. And, the Office of Spiritual life can guide you as you grow in your faith. Upperclassmen and grad students serve as Resident Chaplains (RCs).  

2019/20 Tuition & Fees

Undergrad: $34,630

2018/19 Financial Aid

$24,918

Grad Rate

55%

Salary After Attending

$23k – $55k

Medical Assistant to RN

Transition from Medical Assistant to RN

What is the quickest way to go from a medical assistant to RN?

Differences Between Medical Assistant and RN

A big difference between a Medical Assistant (MA) and Registered Nurse (RN) is scope of practice. These health care pros may have overlapping admin and clinical job duties. But, RNs tend to provide a level of patient care that MAs don’t. So, they might need to pursue different levels of education.

Like RNs, MAs could work in a hospital, medical office, or other healthcare facility. They typically schedule appointments and take down patient info. They could take vital signs, such as blood pressure. And, they may enter patient info into Electronic Health Records (EHRs). Along with that, some Medical Assistants do basic clinical tasks. They might:

  • Do simple lab tests
  • Give injections or medicine
  • Provide wound care
  • Prep patients for x-rays

Registered Nurses may also record patient info and medical histories, like MAs. But, they may do more in depth check-ups. Before the doctor sees the patient, the RN may look at their condition and note symptoms. RNs also help put together treatment plans and educate patients. They may manage LPNs (Licensed Practical Nurses). And most importantly, they care for patients. That includes giving treatments and medications.

For RNs in different areas of medicine, clinical tasks may vary. Here are just a few examples:

  • Critical care nurses care for and monitor those with urgent or acute illnesses.
  • Neonatal nurses care for babies who are born premature or with health issues.
  • Genetics nurses do screening, counseling, and treatment for health problems that can be inherited.
  • Public health nurses educate the public about common health issues. They do screenings, outreach, and more.

MAs and RNs may prepare for their career paths in different ways. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, RNs typically pursue one of three types of education:

An approved nursing program that awards a diploma

These nursing programs may be offered by hospitals or medical centers. They usually take 2 to 3 years. You could study areas like nursing basics, surgical nursing, and patient care. Plus, you’ll need to do clinical experience.

An Associate Degree in Nursing (ADN). Or, an Associate of Science in Nursing (ASN)

Like a diploma program, an ADN or ASN may take 2 to 3 years to earn. But, they may be more common than the latter type of program. Nursing students may take courses in anatomy, physiology, and microbiology. Plus, social and behavioral sciences and the liberal arts. Again, you’ll need to do clinical experience.

A BSN, or Bachelor of Science in Nursing

A Bachelor of Science in Nursing program may include all the same courses and clinical experience as the ADN or ASN. But, it may cover even more ground. Like, communications, leadership, and more science courses. This program may take about 4 years, in total. Already earned an ADN or ASN and want to earn a four-year nursing degree? Some nurses go on to earn their Bachelor’s degree in RN-to-BSN programs. Also called RN bridge programs.

MAs may also have a few education paths to consider:

  • Postsecondary certificate. This is the most common path. A postsecondary cert for medical assistants can be found at community colleges, vocational schools, and more. They may take about a year to earn. You could study subjects like medical terminology and anatomy. Expect to do lab work as well as classroom or online learning.
  • On the job training. Many states don’t have formal education rules for MAs. Employers may prefer that you earn a cert or degree. But, some may hire medical assistants with a high school diploma and train them on the job.
  • Associate degree. You may also find degree programs in medical assisting. Often offered by community colleges, they may be earned in around 2 years. You could take courses in anything from medical coding and health insurance to pharmacology and nutrition. You could also take some general college courses. Like, algebra and communication.

As you can see, a registered nursing program and a medical assisting program may cover some of the same ground. Like anatomy, physiology, and other courses related to the health sciences. But, the nursing program may focus more on clinical skills and knowledge. While, an MA program may focus more on admin functions and general health care knowledge. Each program is designed to help students prepare for the duties they may find in their intended role. So, an MA looking to pursue an RN career path will need to fill in some gaps in their education.

1

Southern New Hampshire University

  • Take advantage of some of the nation’s most affordable tuition rates, while earning a degree from a private, nonprofit, NEASC accredited university.
  • Generous transfer policy, accepting up to 90 credits; the university also partners with community colleges for easy transfer..
Sanhu-university

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2

University of Arizona Global Campus

  • Accredited University offering Associate’s, Bachelor’s and Master’s Degrees
  • Affordable tuition, 5-6 week courses, and various payment options
  • 80+ online programs
Ashford University

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Featured Schools

How to Transition

Can a Medical Assistant become an RN? Not overnight. But MAs could potentially transition to an RN career path with more education. That means nursing school. There is no direct path from MA to RN, but there are several education paths that could help you launch this career change. These include: 

MA to ADN or ASN

As an MA, you could earn your Associate Degree in Nursing or Associate of Science in Nursing degree. This usually takes 2 to 3 years and could be the quickest path to pursuing your career change to RN. Already earned an Associate’s degree to become a Medical Assistant? Depending on your school, you may be able to transfer some credits. Especially GE (general education) credits. You could even do some or all of your coursework online, depending on the program. But nursing programs also call for in person clinical experience. That can’t be done online. But, you might be able to do your clinicals at a site near you.

MA to BSN

Another option is to earn your Bachelor of Science in Nursing. A potential benefit to this is that some employers look for Registered Nurses with Bachelor’s degrees. You may also need a Bachelor of Science in Nursing for admin jobs or other types of nursing role. This path may take about 4 years from start to finish. But if you have college credits to transfer, you may be able to earn the degree in less time. It all depends on whether your nursing program accepts transfer credits. Most online Bachelor of Science in Nursing programs are designed for current RNs who haven’t yet earned a Bachelor’s. But, you may be able to find a regular Bachelor of Science in Nursing program with online courses.

MA to LPN to RN

An LPN is a Licensed Practical Nurse. They may need less education than an RN – often, a certificate or diploma program that takes about a year to earn. So, pursuing an LPN career path could be a way to get a taste of nursing. From there, you could pursue an LPN to RN program. Or, an LPN to ADN program. These bridge programs build on an LPN’s knowledge to help them pursue an RN career path. They may even award credits for prior learning. So, these programs could take less time than you think. And you may be able to complete coursework except clinicals online.

Besides education, you’ll also need to pursue a nursing license from your state. The rules depend on where you live. But, you’ll have to pass the National Council Licensure Examination (NCLEX-RN). Many states also need a background check and other requirements. Check with your state board of nursing to learn more.

Why Switch?

Both Medical Assistants and Registered Nurses have vital roles to play in hospitals and other health care settings. So why switch from MA to RN? Here are a few reasons to consider:

  • You could potentially earn more. The 2019 median annual salary for RNs was $73,300 per year. While, MAs earned $34,800. Needless to say, that’s a big pay gap. No wonder some MAs pursue more training and education to go after RN roles.
  • You could gain more responsibilities. RNs may have more challenging duties than MAs. They may work more directly with patients and even educate them about their health. MAs often play more of a supporting role. While some do clinical tasks that involve patients, others mainly do office work. Like setting appointments or entering records. So, MAs seeking to do more in their careers might want to consider nursing.
  • You could enhance your career. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), RNs may seek to go even further. They could potentially become Nurse Practitioners with more education, like earning a Master’s degree. Like a Master of Science in Nursing (MSN) degree. Or, they could pursue other roles in nursing. Like nursing management, admin, and more.

What Financial Aid is Available?

Financial aid may help you afford to pursue a Registered Nursing program. This is key if you’re planning a career transition from MA to RN. Financial aid may be available to those who qualify. A key first step is to fill out the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). This will help you know if you qualify for federal financial aid. Like, grants, loans, and work-study.

Federal grants are awards you typically don’t have to pay back. Student loans have to be paid back. But federal loans may come with benefits that private loans don’t offer. Like, lower interest rates. Or subsidized interest, where the government pays your interest while you are in nursing school. And the Federal Work-Study Program may let you work part time to earn money for school.

Scholarships are another possible form of aid. Nursing schools and outside organizations may offer scholarships for nursing students. The American Association of College of Nursing (AACN) awards nursing scholarships. So does the National League for Nursing (NLN). And, many other orgs.

MA and RN Licensing and Certifications

MAs usually don’t need state certification, per the BLS. But, employers may want to hire MAs with a cert. Like, Certified Medical Assistant (CMA) from the American Association of Medical Assistants (AAMA). You must be at least 18, pass an exam, and meet requirements for education and work experience.

On the other hand, all RNs need state licensure. Check with your state board for all the requirements. Like, criminal background checks. But you must do two main things to pursue your RN license: 

  • Graduate from an approved nursing education program
  • Pass the National Council Licensure Examination (NCLEX-RN)

Registered Nurses could also pursue additional certs. They might become certified through professional orgs, in specific areas. Like, gerontology or pediatrics. And, RNs may need to earn certs in CPR, basic life support (BLS), and / or advanced cardiac life support (ACLS).

  • *This is an offer for educational opportunities that may lead to employment and not an offer or guarantee of employment and that may help prepare students to meet the licensing or certification requirements of the field they choose to study. Students should check with the appropriate licensing or certifying body to make sure the program they apply to will help meet any licensing or certification requirements. Students should also consult with a representative from the school they select to learn more about career opportunities in that field. Program outcomes vary according to each institution’s specific program curriculum.

Trade Schools That Don’t Require a High School Diploma or GED

Trade Schools That Don’t Require a High School Diploma or GED

Trade schools may be a great option for many types of students. Those who like to work with their hands will enjoy the skills-based training at trade school. Those who are looking into a trade career will find this type of education to be more practical. Fortunately, there are many trade schools that don’t require high school diploma or GED. Trade schools that don’t require high school diploma or GED are accessible to all types of students. If you did not finish high school, you can still have a career. Careers in trade are both lucrative and fulfilling. Additionally, you may be interested in colleges that do not required GEDs or High school diplomas.

Can You Go to Trade School Without a GED or High School Diploma?

Trade schools offer a different curriculum than four-year colleges and universities. However, many of these schools still require students to have a high school diploma or GED. Fortunately, there are options for students who do not have a high school diploma or GED. There are some trade schools that accept students without a high school diploma or GED.

If I Don’t Have a GED or High School Diploma, What are the Admission Requirements?

Admission requirements for trade schools are very different than at colleges. Trade schools are primarily concerned with their students having the skills needed for their desired trade. While some schools require students to have a GED or high school diploma, others do not. Typically, trade schools that don’t require high school diploma or GED often have different admission requirements. These can include:

  • A copy of high school transcripts
  • Certifications from skills-based training programs
  • Ability to pass a proficiency exam
  • A personal statement

What are My Options If I Don’t Have a GED or High School Diploma?

There are options for students who do not have a high school diploma or GED. It is important to research trade schools that don’t require high school diploma or GED. You may find that there are several schools located nearby that will accept you. If you cannot find any options on your own, you may want to contact the local high school. Often, the guidance counselors at the high school could provide you with more information. They could tell you more about trade schools in the area. They may also provide you with information about their admission requirements.

Penn Foster

  • Open the door to a career opportunity with from an accredited, online school offering associate, career diploma and certificate programs
  • Learn online, at a pace that is right for you in the convenience of your own home
  • Affordable tuition with customized payment plans are available to fit your current needs

In some cases, it may help to get letters of recommendation. These letters could provide personal proof of your commitment. A letter from a former teacher, colleague or employer can go a long way. These letters could offer more information about your background. They might explain why you are a good fit for the trade school you are applying to.

Am I Eligible for Financial Aid if I Don’t Have a GED or High School Diploma?

Trade schools may offer financial aid for students. Many students are able to obtain financial aid through federal student loans. However, federal student loans are only available to those who have a GED or high school diploma. Financial aid may be available to those who qualify.

If you do not have a high school diploma or GED, you may not be eligible to receive financial aid from the federal government. But, you may have options available to you. You could contact local community organizations and non-profits to find out if they have scholarship opportunities. Some of these opportunities may be available to students without a high school diploma or GED. It may take a lot of research. However, the result is worth it. Financial aid could help make it easier for you to enroll at a trade school.

What is Ability to Benefit?

According to the U.S. Department of Education, Ability to Benefit is a law that allows students without a high school diploma or GED to qualify for some financial aid. Students who qualify for Ability to Benefit may be eligible to receive Title IV funding.

Ability to Benefit is beneficial for students who do not have a high school diploma or GED. A student who had to leave school early to help provide for their family could now receive assistance to pursue their career. A student who struggled with academic work but excelled with hands-on learning can now go to trade school. Ability to Benefit could help students get the assistance they need to pursue a trade.

What Kind of Trade Schools Do Not Require a GED or High School Diploma?

There are several types of trade schools that may not require a high school diploma or GED. These types of trade schools include:

  • Community Colleges — Many community colleges offer trade school programs. Students can attend a community college, yet pursue a trade. There are several community colleges across the country that do not require a high school diploma or GED. Community colleges may offer a variety of trade school programs. These programs may include culinary, electrical, plumbing or others.
  • Beauty Schools — Some beauty schools do not require students to have a high school diploma or GED. Beauty schools prepare students to pursue a career in cosmetology. These hands-on learning programs allow students to learn the art and science of styling hair. They also may have makeup application programs.
  • Massage Schools — There are massage therapy schools that do not require students to have a high school diploma or GED. At a massage therapy school, students learn how to apply massage techniques. They may work in a salon, or in a clinical setting. Massage therapy schools offer hands-on lessons as well as online learning opportunities.
  • Nursing Assistant Schools — Anyone who wants to work in the medical field but does not have a high school diploma or GED could apply to a nursing assistant school. These trade schools train students to become certified nursing assistants, or CNAs. CNAs help nurses perform critical tasks throughout the day. They could work directly with patients. It is a great option for students who are passionate about medicine.

While some trade schools do not require students to have a high school diploma or GED, you should keep in mind state licensing requirements. You may need to earn a GED to apply for a state license. This is why many trade schools offer GED programs as well. You should research the licensing requirements in your state. This will help you select the best trade school for you.

Trade Schools that Don’t Require a GED or High School Diploma

1 Front Range Community College
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Front Range Community College is located in Colorado. This community college is known for its open admission policy. It accepts students without a high school diploma or GED. It offers a variety of technical programs. These include HVAC and Refrigeration and Welding. 

2019/20 Tuition & Fees

Undergrad: $3,900

Students who Receive Financial Aid (2019/20)

55%

Avg. Amount of Financial Aid Awarded (2019/20)

$6,100

Grad Rate

26%

2 Southern Technical College
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Southern Technical College is a community college in Florida that has many technical programs. Students without a high school diploma or GED can take advantage of its career pathways program. Some of its trade programs include medical assisting, veterinary assisting, electrical technology and welding. 

2019/20 Tuition & Fees

Undergrad: $18,000

Students who Receive Financial Aid (2019/20)

85%

Avg. Amount of Financial Aid Awarded (2019/20)

$4,500

Grad Rate

61%

3 Southern Technical College
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Southern Technical College is a community college in Florida that has many technical programs. Students without a high school diploma or GED can take advantage of its career pathways program. Some of its trade programs include medical assisting, veterinary assisting, electrical technology and welding. 

2019/20 Tuition & Fees

Undergrad: $18,000

Students who Receive Financial Aid (2019/20)

85%

Avg. Amount of Financial Aid Awarded (2019/20)

$4,500

Grad Rate

61%

4 Community College of Baltimore County
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Community College of Baltimore County is located in Maryland. Students without a high school diploma or GED can enroll at this community college. It has many trade programs that students can choose from. Its trade programs include contact tracing investigator training, manufacturing and more. 

2019/20 Tuition & Fees

Undergrad: $7,300

Students who Receive Financial Aid (2019/20)

65%

Avg. Amount of Financial Aid Awarded (2019/20)

$3,600

Grad Rate

11%

Penn Foster

  • Open the door to a career opportunity with from an accredited, online school offering associate, career diploma and certificate programs
  • Learn online, at a pace that is right for you in the convenience of your own home
  • Affordable tuition with customized payment plans are available to fit your current needs

5 Georgia Beauty School
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The Georgia Beauty School is a beauty academy in Norcross, Georgia. This beauty school accepts students without a high school diploma or GED. It offers a variety of beauty programs, including cosmetology, nail technician and esthetician. 

2019/20 Tuition & Fees

Undergrad: $6,000

Students who Receive Financial Aid (2019/20)

0

Avg. Amount of Financial Aid Awarded (2019/20)

N/A

Grad Rate

N/A

6 Central Community College
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Students in Nebraska who do not have a high school diploma or GED can attend Central Community College. Students who are 16 years old must enroll in the GED program while taking classes. However, students who are 18 years old do not have to complete their GED. Some of the trade programs offered at this community college include automotive technology, dental assisting and heavy equipment operator technician. 

2019/20 Tuition & Fees

Undergrad: $3,100

Students who Receive Financial Aid (2019/20)

71%

Avg. Amount of Financial Aid Awarded (2019/20)

$3,100

Grad Rate

41%

7 St. Charles Community College
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St. Charles Community College is located in Missouri. This community college accepts students who do not have a high school diploma or GED. Students will find that there are many trade programs at this school. Some of those trade programs include medical billing, medical assisting, phlebotomy, personal fitness training and more. 

2019/20 Tuition & Fees

Undergrad: $4,100

Students who Receive Financial Aid (2019/20)

75%

Avg. Amount of Financial Aid Awarded (2019/20)

$3,700

Grad Rate

22%

Students who do not have a high school diploma or GED have many options available. Even without a high school diploma or GED, students can apply to select schools. They can pursue an education. They could work toward a career. This is often the first step in building a new life for themselves.

For many students who do not have a high school diploma or GED, academics are difficult. They may struggle with traditional schooling. They may not have felt like they fit into a typical classroom. These students often benefit from trade programs. Fortunately, there are many technical schools that do not require a high school diploma or GED. Students who do not have a high school diploma or GED should begin researching schools in their area that will consider them. The admission requirements may vary based on the school. Students should use personal statements and essays to provide more information about their background. They can use this part of the application to share their story. These stories can provide compelling evidence. They can help prove that students are committed to succeeding. They can show that they are willing to take on a challenge. They can offer insight into why the student wants to pursue a trade as a career.

Trade schools may be a great option for all types of students. Many people who enjoy hands on work will like working in a trade. From working in a beauty salon to welding in a shop, there are options for every type of person.

Anyone who does not have a high school diploma or GED should know more about their options. There are trade schools that may accept students without a high school diploma or GED. For more information about trade schools and their admission requirements, contact us today. We look forward to helping you find the perfect fit for you.

Colleges That Don’t Require a High School Diploma or GED

There are students who want to go to college but do not have a high school diploma or GED. They may feel like their options are limited. However, there may be unique and innovative options available to them. There are many community colleges that accept students without a high school diploma or GED. There also some universities that accept these students. This is the information that you need to know about colleges that don’t require high school diploma or GED. Additionally, you may also be interested in trade schools that don’t require a high school diploma or GED.  

Can You Go to College Online Without a GED or High School Diploma? 

The average college or university requires students to have a high school diploma or GED. However, there may be alternative options available. Students without a GED or high school diploma may be able to enroll in online classes. They also may be able to enroll at traditional colleges. Some community colleges and online schools have options for students without a GED or high school diploma. Students who want to attend college but do not have a GED or high school diploma should evaluate the options available to them.

If I Don’t Have a GED or High School Diploma, What Are College Admission Requirements? 

The admission requirements will vary based on the school. These may include: 

  • Meeting a minimum age requirement. Students typically have to be at least 18 years old. Some may be able to enroll at 16 years old if they also work toward earning their GED.
  • Ability to enroll in remedial courses. These classes help students catch up on missed information. 
  • Providing proof of academic accomplishments. Students may submit reading lists or alternative education program results. 
  • Submitting a personal statement. This essay allows students to provide more information about their background and experience. 
  • Submitting standardized test scores. Adult students without a GED or high school diploma can take the SAT or ACT tests. 

What Are My Options If I Don’t Have a GED or High School Diploma?

There may be options for you if you do not have a GED or high school diploma. These may be some of the most common options:

  • Applying as a non-traditional student. This option may be available at colleges that accept students without a GED or high school diploma. A non-traditional student is considered any adult who has not been enrolled in high school for more than 6 years. If you apply as a non-traditional student, you may have to submit other materials. This may include recommendation letters, test scores and a personal statement.
  • Enroll in a community college. Some community colleges across the country accept students without a high school diploma or GED. After completing courses at community college, you may be able to transfer. You could use your academic records to transfer to a four-year college or university. You also may be able to complete your degree program at the community college. Many community colleges offer online classes.
  • Enroll as a lifelong student. A lifelong student is defined as a person who takes an individual class during a semester. You could complete coursework that is relevant to your career goals. This might help you build skills, and help you gain knowledge.
  • Consider finishing high school while taking college classes online. There are some colleges that allow students to earn their diploma while beginning their college career. It is important to verify that this option is available. If you are interested, you should check with the college you are considering. 

Am I Eligible for Financial Aid If I Don’t Have a GED or High School Diploma?

Many federal student loans are only available to students with a high school diploma or GED. However, the Ability to Benefit program was changed in 2015. Now, some students without a GED or high school diploma may be able to receive financial aid. Financial aid may be available to those who qualify.

The eligibility requirements typically include: 

  • Being enrolled in a program that receives Title IV funding. These are typically career pathways programs.
  • Passing the Ability to Benefit exam.  
  • Completing six credits that could be applied toward a degree program. 

Students without a diploma or GED may also have additional options for financial aid. If you do not have a GED or high school diploma, you may want to reach out to local non-profit organizations and private companies. Some of them may offer scholarships to qualifying applicants.

What is Ability to Benefit?

According to the U.S. Department of Education, Ability to Benefit is an educational law. This law was amended in 2015. Now, it allows for qualifying students without a high school diploma or GED to be eligible for Title IV funding. The law was amended in order to help more students enroll in college. The hope is that students without a diploma or GED will feel that college is within their reach. Those who amended the law believe that it will help thousands of students nationwide.

Colleges That Don’t Require a GED or High School Diploma

There are colleges and universities across the country that do not require a GED or high school diploma. Here are a list of some colleges that do not require a GED or high school diploma:  

1University of California
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The University of California is a four-year university that may accept students without a high school diploma or GED. This school has several campuses in the state. Students without a GED or high school diploma must pass the California High School Proficiency Examination. In addition, students must meet all other admission requirements.

Tuition & Fees

Undergrad: $35,000

Financial Aid

Grants & Awards
55% Get, Avg. Amt. $18,000

Grad Rate

97%

2 Southern Technical College
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Southern Technical College offers a career pathways program. This school is located in Florida. Students without a high school diploma or GED may be eligible for it. Students must pass the Ability to Benefit exam, enroll in a GED preparation course and enroll in career training classes.

Tuition & Fees

Undergrad: $18,000

Financial Aid

Grants & Awards
85% Get, Avg. Amt. $4,500

Grad Rate

61%

3 Columbia-Green Community College
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Columbia-Greene Community College is based out of Hudson, New York. It may accept students without a high school diploma or GED. There are several admission requirements. Students must be at least 17 years old. They also must take a placement exam. They may have to work with a counselor to learn more about additional requirements.

Tuition & Fees

Undergrad $5,300

Financial Aid

Grants & Awards
70% Get, Avg. Amt. $4,700

Grad Rate

35%

1

Southern New Hampshire University

  • Take advantage of some of the nation’s most affordable tuition rates, while earning a degree from a private, nonprofit, NEASC accredited university
  • Generous transfer policy, accepting up to 90 credits; the university also partners with community colleges for easy transfer.
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2

Purdue Global University

  • Competency-based ExcelTrack™ Programs may allow you to earn your degree faster and for less money
  • Experience world-class education online with more than 175 programs at associate’s, bachelor’s, master’s and doctoral levels.
Purdue Global University

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4 Community College of Baltimore County
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The Community College of Baltimore County may accept students without a high school diploma or GED. It is located in Baltimore, Maryland. Students must pass an entrance exam or commit to completing their GED while enrolled.

Tuition & Fees

Undergrad: $7,300

Financial Aid

Grants & Awards
65% Get, Avg. Amt. $3,600

Grad Rate

11%

5 St. Charles Community College
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St. Charles Community College is a school in Missouri that may accept students without a high school diploma or GED. Students could be admitted if they are eligible for Ability to Benefit. They have to complete an application. They also have to take an academic skills assessment.

Tuition & Fees

Undergrad: $4,100

Financial Aid

Grants & Awards
75% Get, Avg. Amt. $3,700

Grad Rate

22%

6 University of Hawaii Community Colleges
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The University of Hawaii Community Colleges does not require students to have a high school diploma or GED. Students who wish to enroll have to be at least 18 years old.

Tuition & Fees

Undergrad: $3,200

Financial Aid

Grants & Awards
57% Get, Avg. Amt. $4,200

Grad Rate

16%

7 Wayne County Community College District
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Wayne County Community College is a community college located in Detroit, Michigan. This community college has an adult education program. Students who do not have a high school diploma or GED are eligible to apply. Students must be at least 18 years old to qualify for the program.

Tuition & Fees

Undergrad: $3,200

Financial Aid

Grants & Awards
81% Get, Avg. Amt. $3,700

Grad Rate

11%

8 Union County College
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Union County College is a community college based out of Cranford, New Jersey. This community college may accept students who do not have a high school diploma or GED. However, students who pass an Ability to Benefit test may not be eligible for financial aid at this school. Students without a GED or high school diploma must be 18 years old to enroll in classes at this community college.

Tuition & Fees

Undergrad: $5,200

Financial Aid

Grants & Awards
64% Get, Avg. Amt. $4,400

Grad Rate

30%

9 Central Community College
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Central Community College is a Nebraska community college that may accept students who do not have a high school diploma or GED. Students who do not have a diploma or GED are eligible to apply as long as they are 18 years old. Students who are 16 years old may apply and work toward their GED at the same time. However, students without a diploma or GED may not be eligible for financial aid.

Tuition & Fees

Undergrad: $3,100

Financial Aid

Grants & Awards
71% Get, Avg. Amt. $3,100

Grad Rate

41%

10 Lawson State Community College 
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Lawson State Community College is located in Alabama. This community college allow students without a high school diploma or GED to apply. Students without a high school diploma or GED must take the Ability to Benefit assessment. Once the student passes the assessment, they work with a school counselor to continue the application process.

Tuition & Fees

Undergrad: $4,800

Financial Aid

Grants & Awards
96% Get, Avg. Amt. $4,700

Grad Rate

17%

11 Community College of Denver
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Community of College of Denver may accept students without a high school diploma or GED. This community college is located in Denver, Colorado. Students without a high school diploma or GED could apply if they qualify for Ability to Benefit. Students who pass the assessment also may be eligible for financial aid.

Tuition & Fees

Undergrad: $4,800

Financial Aid

Grants & Awards
71% Get, Avg. Amt. $6,200

Grad Rate

13%

12 Westchester Community College
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Westchester Community College is an extension of the State University of New York. This community college is located in Valhalla, New York. Students who do not have a high school diploma or GED may apply to this school. The admission requirements include passing the Ability to Benefit assessment.

Tuition & Fees

Undergrad: $5,000

Financial Aid

Grants & Awards
65% Get, Avg. Amt. $5,100

Grad Rate

18%

These are just a few of the colleges that don’t require high school diploma or GED. There may be other community colleges and universities across the country that accept these students. Students without a high school diploma or GED do have options available to them. If you do not have a high school diploma or GED, you could begin exploring your options. You may be eligible for Ability to Benefit. You also may meet other admission requirements. There is a chance that you could attend a college program. You could pursue your career of choice. 

The next step that you should take is to find the perfect community college or university for you. You may have the choice of traditional school or online programming. You should consider your current lifestyle and responsibilities. An online program may be the most flexible option. However, the traditional classroom experience may be available to you. There are colleges that don’t require high school diploma or GED. Take the next step toward getting an education. This could be the perfect step toward pursuing your career. To learn more about these colleges and universities, contact us today.

Low GPA High SAT

What to Do If You Have a Low GPA but High SAT Score

College applications include a lot of components. You typically need to include the application itself, your essay and your rest result scores. You also need to provide your GPA. Some students have a low GPA but high SAT scores. Here is what you need to know about low GPA high SAT scores. 

Most colleges have admissions requirements. They often have a GPA threshold. They may also require students to earn a minimum score on standardized tests. For some students, having a low GPA but high SAT score may be limiting. They may not perfectly fit into the admissions criteria. 

However, hope is not lost. Students with a low GPA but high SAT score still may be admitted. It is important to carefully fill out the application. Students should highlight their accomplishments whenever possible. They may want to add extra elements to their application. They also may want to work with their counselor to complete the application. A counselor could help a student portray the best version of themselves on paper. 

What do Colleges Think of Your Low GPA High SAT? 

Colleges consider every student to be an individual. They may see a low GPA as a disadvantage. However, they may view a high SAT score as an indication that means that the student is capable. 

When reviewing an application with a low GPA but high SAT score, colleges may look at trends. They will want to see that the student continuously improved. Colleges want to accept driven, motivated students. It is important to show that your grades continued to improve over time. Continuous decline in GPA may prevent a college from admitting you. Different colleges will have different admissions standards. You should consider this when selecting schools to apply to. 

1

Southern New Hampshire University

  • Take advantage of some of the nation’s most affordable tuition rates, while earning a degree from a private, nonprofit, NEASC accredited university
  • Generous transfer policy, accepting up to 90 credits; the university also partners with community colleges for easy transfer.
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2

Purdue Global University

  • Competency-based ExcelTrack™ Programs may allow you to earn your degree faster and for less money
  • Experience world-class education online with more than 175 programs at associate’s, bachelor’s, master’s and doctoral levels.
Purdue Global University

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Does GPA or SAT Score Matter More? 

Every college will look at a combination of factors. They will review a students GPA. They also will compare the students’ test scores. A low GPA combined with a high SAT may seem contradictory. However, colleges weigh these factors differently. Many college admissions officers may rely on GPA to make their decision. They may feel that GPA shows a better overall picture of academic strength. This is because a GPA is formed over the course of time. It shows how well a student performed consistently. 

This may be disappointing to someone with a low GPA but high SAT score. However, there is still hope. A high SAT score could show that the ability is there. The GPA trend may be compared with the SAT score to show the whole picture. 

Why is Your GPA Low? 

A low GPA alone may not prevent you from getting into college. Students with a low GPA could simply have to explain their circumstances. There are a variety of factors that could contribute to a low GPA. Students who have to work to help support their family may not be able to study as often. Those who are involved in extracurricular activities may see their GPA suffer. And, students who struggled early in high school may find their GPA always lags behind. A GPA may be low for a variety of reasons. 

What is a Good GPA? 

A student’s grade point average, or GPA, is typically calculated on a 4.0 scale. According to U.S. News and World Report, many colleges require a minimum GPA of 2.0 for acceptance. A good GPA is usually considered to be anything between 3.0 and 3.5. A 4.0 GPA is excellent.

A student who has a good GPA in high school has most likely developed solid study habits. This indicates they have a good chance of succeeding in the college environment. A student with a low GPA may have to prove that they can succeed. They could do this by adding other elements to their college application. Every college has its own admissions requirements. Students should compare their GPA with the requirements of the colleges where they plan to apply.

Can You Prove Your Academic Preparation in a Different Way? 

Students with a low GPA but high SAT score could still show that they are prepared. There are other ways to highlight academic accomplishment on a college application. One way you could do this is to include a copy of your school records. College admissions officers might review these records, and learn more about your strengths. They may find that your GPA suffered because you struggled in science courses. On your application, you could talk about your strengths in reading comprehension and writing. If you are applying to a communications program, the college may see that you are prepared for that degree program.

If you took summer training to improve your knowledge in a subject, you might want to add that to your application. You could show the college admissions officers that you are willing to work hard to accomplish your goals.

How Can You Compensate with the Rest of Your Application? 

It is possible to be creative when applying to college. Your low GPA but high SAT score is not the only component. You could use your personal statement, the courses you enrolled in, and your extracurricular activities as part of your application. The point is to show you are well-rounded individual. You should show that you can contribute to the college community in many ways. You need to prove that you are up for the challenge. Use your application to show that you are willing to work hard to succeed.

Penn Foster

  • Open the door to a career opportunity with from an accredited, online school offering associate, career diploma and certificate programs
  • Learn online, at a pace that is right for you in the convenience of your own home
  • Affordable tuition with customized payment plans are available to fit your current needs

8 Things to do if You Have a Low GPA 

1. Provide recommendation letters

Ask your teachers and counselors to send recommendation letters. Your teachers may go into detail about your work ethic. They could explain where you struggled, and how you dealt with challenges. You should ask several teachers to write letters. Have letters from teachers whose classes you succeeded in. You should also have letters from teachers whose classes you struggled through. Your counselor could provide additional information about your academic standing. This may add more insight into who you are as an individual. Letters of recommendation may provide more context to your low GPA and high SAT scores. Some colleges only ask for one or two letters. However, if you have a low GPA and high SAT score, you may want to include three or four letters.

2. Talk about your classes

Provide details about the classes you took. A college is going to want to know where you excelled and where you struggled. Some students with an excellent GPA apply to elite schools, only to show that they did very well in very easy courses. The college admissions officer also will usually evaluate which classes lowered your GPA. For example, if math was difficult for you, they may notice that you had a higher GPA in other areas while you struggled in math classes. The types of classes that you took throughout high school help provide more insight into your overall GPA.

3. Talk about extenuating circumstances

Add information about extenuating circumstances. There are a variety of extenuating circumstances that could impact your GPA. For example, you might have had a family crisis during your sophomore year. If you were struggling mentally or physically during that time, your GPA might have dipped lower than normal. Even with hard work during the next two years, your GPA may not have recovered. Providing colleges with information about extenuating circumstances could help them understand your GPA better. They may be less likely to weigh it as heavily as other parts of your application. Deaths in the family, illness, relocation or divorce are all circumstances that could impact your GPA. If your low GPA is the result of a personal challenge, you should share your story.

4. Wait to apply

Apply later when your GPA has improved. Early admissions is not for everyone. While some students may submit applications in June, July or August, others may need more time. If your GPA is low, you may want to consider applying later in the school year. This gives you time to improve your grades. This allows you to show that you are moving in the right direction. Even though you aren’t applying as early, you may be improving your chances of being accepted. Giving yourself time to grow and succeed may be the best step. There is nothing wrong with applying later in the school year. You may consider waiting until January, February or March of your senior year. 

5. Apply to community colleges

Focus on applying to community colleges. Depending on your GPA, you might want to start your college career at a community college. Community colleges often have a lower GPA requirement for admission. They may also offer courses that help students prepare better in the subjects that were difficult for them. You may find that you earn a much higher GPA at community college. After one or two years, you may be able to transfer to another college or university. It is important to remember that you don’t have to limit your applications to four-year colleges or universities. You should explore your options. Community college may be the perfect fit for many students who have a low GPA but high SAT score.

6. Highlight extracurricular activities

Highlight your extracurricular activities. It is important that you show who you are as a person. Your college application is about more than your scores. With a low GPA and high SAT score, you should show other sides of yourself. Your extracurricular activities could prove that you are committed to community. If you spent long hours helping with the theater productions, then it’s likely your GPA may have suffered. If you spent your time working on the school newspaper, then you might have developed skills that will be more beneficial to you than academic success. You should provide details about all activities you were involved in. Sports and clubs are common extracurricular activities in high school. You also should document any part-time jobs that you had. All of these commitments might impact your GPA. The college should have a better understanding of who you are.

7. Talk about your interests

Talk about your academic interests outside of the classroom. Sometimes, structured classroom work is too difficult for some students. This does not mean that they are not smart or capable. A student who did not earn good grades in algebra class may also spend all of their free time reading classic literature. Perhaps you enjoy stargazing and meteorology, but your science grades are still low. You should use your application to show that you are interested in academic topics. This could help prove that you are motivated to work hard. It shows that you have a desire to learn. It may help the college feel more confident in your ability to succeed.

8. Write a personal statement

Write a compelling personal statement. Many college applications require an essay. When you write your essay, use it as a chance to be accountable. You should admit that your GPA is lower than you would like. Take the time to highlight your SAT score. You should explain the circumstances surrounding your data. Through writing, you could add personality and flair to your application. Use your words to prove how much you want to be admitted. Make promises about how you intend to spend your time at college. Talk about your career goals. List your dreams for your college experience. Explain why you want to attend that school. A compelling personal statement could help your admission chances significantly.

If you have a low GPA but high SAT score, you may still have options. You will want to carefully craft your college application. Showcase your strengths and talents across the board. It is important to highlight your best accomplishments. Sometimes, these accomplishments extend beyond your grades and scores.

Southern New Hampshire University

  • No application fee for April & June terms.
  • Multiple term start dates throughout the year. 24/7 online classroom access.
  • Popular Online Programs include Business Administration, Psychology, Information Technology, Human Services…

10 Reasons to Earn a Degree After the Military

10 Reasons to Earn a Degree After the Military

Why Military Veterans Should Consider Reasons to Earn a Degree After the Military

There are many reasons to earn a degree after the military. It may solidify skills and prep you for the civilian job market. No matter where you are in your service journey, it is a step to consider. And one you may be more prepared than you think. The military provides many soft skills that may set you up for success in a civilian role. Soft skills are qualities like being dependable and having a strong work ethic. Being able to resolve conflict and adapt are a few more that employers appreciate.  

Naturally, each area of service shapes different skill sets. But if you identify yours, it can make your education feel more purposeful.  

10 Reasons to Earn a Degree After the Military  

Here are ten reasons to earn a degree after the military.  

1. Pave the way to higher earnings

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, full time workers age of 25 and over with a bachelors degree had median weekly earnings of $1,248 in 2019. Compared with workers who only had a high school diploma, that’s $502 more per week.

2. More education might equal less unemployment

Having a college degree may help you land a job. The same BLS.gov report found that full time workers age of 25 and over with an associate degree experienced an unemployment rate of 2.7%. The rate is lower for workers with a bachelors degree (2.2%). For workers with a high school diploma, the unemployment rate is higher (3.7%).

3. Your military skills may count towards college credit

In the military, you honed key technical and communication skills that may help you in the civilian job market. Knowing this, many colleges offer credit for qualified military training. So, a degree may be more accessible than you think. To get the process started, you may want to order your Joint Service Transcript so that your college can review it.

4. Adapt your skills for a civilian job

Through military service, you may have many marketable skills. Like leadership and a solid handle on how to manage time, teams and projects. That said, the military has its own style. So, attending college may help you mold your talents for use in a specific career field.   

1

Southern New Hampshire University

  • Take advantage of some of the nation’s most affordable tuition rates, while earning a degree from a private, nonprofit, NEASC accredited university
  • Generous transfer policy, accepting up to 90 credits; the university also partners with community colleges for easy transfer.
Sanhu-university

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2

Purdue Global University

  • Competency-based ExcelTrack™ Programs may allow you to earn your degree faster and for less money
  • Experience world-class education online with more than 175 programs at associate’s, bachelor’s, master’s and doctoral levels.
Purdue Global University

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5. Education is good for the heart 

Another reason to earn a degree after the military can be found in federal statistics which shows that education may be heart healthy. Figures show that, on average, bachelors prepared 25 year old’s live about nine years longer that those who did not graduate from high school.  

6. Score promotion points  

Points toward promotion is one of the incentives the military offers to enlisted service members when they use education benefits. The number of points varies by branch. For instance, the Army may reward Soldiers with up to 100 points toward their promotions. The Marine Corps may grant up to 75 points toward promotions. And, the Navy may award points to Sailors who have earned their degrees. These points may help you to climb the ladder in the military or prompt you to pursue a civilian career. Either way, for most entry level jobs, you need a bachelors degree (BLS.gov).

7. Find a new direction 

You may be doing a job you love in the military and want to build a civilian career in the same line of work. Or, ready to find a new path that builds on your strengths. Military veterans tend to perform well in college and choose a wide range of majors.

8. College may support your transition 

Many military friendly colleges have resources to help veterans make the leap into civilian life. You may find enrollment counselors that work to help you navigate everything from benefits to program choice. There are also online programs designed to enable you to progress towards a degree at your own pace. And from wherever you are with a computer and internet.

9. Build new networks 

A college degree may help you expand professional and personal networks. Apart from course work, there may be other resources to help you with a job search. Many colleges have workshops and dedicated centers where you can learn to optimize your resume and profiles, prep for interviews and so on. 

10. Prep for in demand career paths 

Even people already in the workforce are upgrading their skills to prep for a brighter future. Over half of adults (54%) in the workforce feel they need to add more skills to stay current and competitive in the job market. Plus, for some of the fastest growing fields, you need a bachelors degree or higher.  

Degree and Career Paths for Military Veterans

One of the key steps to landing a job, is earning the degree that help prepare you for it. Here are a few degree and career paths for military veterans.

1

Bachelors in Computer Science / Information Science

Skills: Critical thinking, complex problem solving, judgement
Career Opportunities: Information Security Analyst, Computer and Info Systems Manager, Database Administrator, Software Developer

Information Security Analyst

As an info sec analyst, your job is to secure networks and systems against hackers and other breaches. Since cyber crime is on the rise, this is one of the faster growing fields today. In fact, the industry predicts 32% more jobs by 2028. While salaries vary, on average, info sec analysts earn a median annual salary of $99,730. If this field interests you, you might start with a bachelors degree in computer science, info assurance, programming or one related. Then, to move up the ladder, many employers look for candidates with an MBA.

Computer and Info Systems Manager 

As a computer and IT manager, you work with a business to figure out its technology goals and needs, Then, help plan and direct things like installation and upgrades. As more firms expand into digital platforms, the field should see 11% more jobs by 2028. If this interests you, many people enter with a bachelors degree, but tend to need a grad degree for more complex roles. That said, the 2019 median annual salary in this field is $146,360.

Database Administrator 

DBAs or database administrators use software to store, secure and organize data. Their day to day may include running tests and backing up data. Job prospects should be favorable (9% to 24% by 2028) depending on the service industry. It is brightest for DBAs in computer systems design due to the popularity of cloud computing. For entry level roles, DBAs typically need a bachelors degree and proficiency in SQL. But firms with really large databases may prefer candidates with a masters degree.

Software Developer

Software developers are the creative minds who design computer programs. As an app developer, you could design things like word processors, custom software, programs and games. And as a systems developer, you might create the operating systems that run the apps and programs. In both cases, a bachelors degree and skills in the industry you want to work in tend to be vital. The industry expects an average of 21% growth to 2028. Salaries range depending on job title. For example, app developers report median annual salaries of $103,620.

2

Bachelors in Business Administration

Skills: Time management, systems thinking, problem solving
Career Opportunities: Management Analyst, Logistician, Market Research Analyst 

Management Analyst

Many management analysts consult with businesses to help them become more efficient and productive. So, above all, their day tends to include lots of problem solving and finding ways to control costs. These skills are valuable in health care, IT, gov’t and beyond. As a result, demand should reach 14% by 2028, which is much faster than average. Also above average are median annual salaries which in May 2019 were $85,260. While a bachelors degree is the common entry point, many employers also look for candidates with an MBA.

Logistician

As a logistician, you have to analyze and track a business’s supply chain. In fact, you may have to manage the entire life cycle of a project from design to transport. You could prepare for this path with a bachelors degree in business, systems engineering or supply chain management. The industry expects to add 5% more jobs by 2028. Salaries in this field range, but the median annual salary is $74,750 per year.

Market Research Analyst

One way you could blend business and communication skills is as a market research analyst. Market research analysts study trends to see if a product or service will sell well. They also help companies understand their target markets, what clients want and the price they will pay for it. Since companies rely on this info to turn a profit, the industry forecasts 20% more growth to 2028 and pays an median annual salary of $63,790. If this interests you, it is likely you will need a bachelors degree and head for math.

3

Bachelors in Nursing

Skills: Critical thinking, emotional stability, attention to detail
Career Opportunities: Registered Nurse, Nurse Manager, Health Educator

Registered Nurse

As a registered nurse, you play a vital role in patient care. Beyond doing a health intake, RNs administer medicines and treatments. RNs also teach patients how to manage their condition, perform diagnostic tests and consult. Depending on your interests, you might also hone specific patient care skills to work with a particular group. Critical care for example, or addiction. The demand for RNs should add 12% more jobs by 2028 in gov’ts, hospitals, rehab centers and beyond. In all these settings, the median annual salary is $73,300.

Medical and Health Services Managers

As many health care services shifts from hospitals to office settings, the need for medical and health services managers is on the rise by 18% to 2028. Medical and health services managers may oversee a department, facility or clinical area. It tends to be a role that calls for skills in budgeting, staffing and organization. To enter the field, people typically have a bachelors degree if not a masters. And, since there may be jobs for people with different levels of education, salaries vary. On average, the median annual wage for medical and health services managers  was $100,980 in May 2019.

Health Educator

If you prefer to teach people about healthy behaviors, a career as a health educator might interest you. Health educators collect data to figure out how to promote wellness to specific groups. This may mean informing people how to avoid diabetes or stroke. Or, advocating for better health resources and policies. The field expects 11% more jobs by 2028 as there’s a need to help people avoid costly diseases and procedures. Some people earn their degree in health education or health promotion. Though there are positions that entail a masters or doctorate. With the range in roles, the median annual wage was $40,360 in May 2019.

4

Bachelors in Criminal Justice

Skills: Communication, leadership, good judgement
Career Opportunities: Police and Detectives, Emergency Management Director

Police and Detectives

Solving crime is the main task of a the police and detectives. In this role, you likely gather all kinds of facts and evidence from crime scenes to fit the pieces of the puzzle together. If you enjoy solving problems and keeping folks safe, there is a constant need for investigators. Through 2028, the field should see 5% growth and median annual salaries of $83,170.

Emergency Management Directors

As an emergency management director, your level head is crucial during times of crisis. In this type of role, you’ll likely come up with tactical plans that respond to disasters and emergencies of all kinds. Keeping risks under control is crucial to many sectors so this field shows 5% growth to 2028. Since there are many moving parts, a bachelors degree and experience are both necessary. Some people earn their degree in criminal justice with a focus on EM. Others may take an alternative route via public admin or something else. Once you graduate, you might earn an median annual salary of $74,590 depending on the sector.

5

Bachelors in Accounting / Finance

Skills: Attention to detail, math, analytical thinking
Career Opportunities: Accountants and Auditors, Cost Estimator, Financial Analyst

Accountants and Auditors

As an accountant or auditor, you use math and detective skills to track financial crimes. Ones like securities fraud, embezzlement and contract disputes. So, this line of work may involve collaborating with law enforcement as an expert witness. If this sounds promising, apart from a degree, it may be useful to work towards CPA status too. Once you graduate, growth in this field is expected to be (6%) to 2028. Salaries do vary, but, accountants earned a median annual wage of $71,550 in May 2019.

Cost Estimator

A cost estimator assesses how much time, money, materials and labor a project requires. Many in this role function as project managers who plan entire jobs whether in construction, IT or another area. Since correct estimates are the key to profit, this job field predicts 9% growth through 2028.That said, the range of industries using cost estimators makes for different pay levels. On average, cost estimators earn a median annual salary of $65,250.

Financial Analyst

A financial analyst is someone who helps guides a business through investment choices. They look at things like stocks, bonds and suggest ways to bolster a portfolio. Many ae at work in banks, pension funds, securities firms and other settings. Having a degree in accounting or finance is necessary for this line of work. And, any certification like the Chartered Financial Analyst (CFA) can also be useful. The field expects to grow by 6% more jobs through 2028 and pays a median annual salary of  $85,660.

1

Southern New Hampshire University

  • Take advantage of some of the nation’s most affordable tuition rates, while earning a degree from a private, nonprofit, NEASC accredited university
  • Generous transfer policy, accepting up to 90 credits; the university also partners with community colleges for easy transfer.
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2

Purdue Global University

  • Competency-based ExcelTrack™ Programs may allow you to earn your degree faster and for less money
  • Experience world-class education online with more than 175 programs at associate’s, bachelor’s, master’s and doctoral levels.
Purdue Global University

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Academic Probation Transfer

What is Academic Probation? 

Academic probation is a red flag that you fall below your school’s metrics for good academic standing. Colleges tend to measure ‘good’ academic progress by GPA and number of earned credits. If you do not meet these criteria, the college may put you on academic probation. You might be able to transfer while on academic probation. As a general rule, a cumulative GPA of less than 2.0 places you on this academic time out. But if your term GPA is lower (say 1.5 -1.99), it may trigger it too.

During your academic probation period, you have the opportunity to improve and get back on track. If not, you might face consequences such as dismissal and loss of financial aid. While on academic probation, you are likely to have to: 

  • Pass a certain number of credits 
  • Earn an acceptable grade point average (GPA) which each college sets 
  • Meet with your academic advisors 

Can I Transfer While on Academic Probation? 

You might still be able to transfer while on academic probation. “Might’ because each college assesses incoming students against their own standards. When you apply for academic probation transfer, some applications ask if you are in good academic standing. If you answer “no” you may be able to explain why you are on it.  

You could then describe your situation and struggles. Putting these things in perspective may help the new college get to know you apart from the “C” grade. In colleges with open admissions policies, this may be enough. They may accept you, regardless of a low GPA. Selective colleges, on the other hand, may not.  

1

Southern New Hampshire University

  • Take advantage of some of the nation’s most affordable tuition rates, while earning a degree from a private, nonprofit, NEASC accredited university
  • Generous transfer policy, accepting up to 90 credits; the university also partners with community colleges for easy transfer.
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2

Purdue Global University

  • Competency-based ExcelTrack™ Programs may allow you to earn your degree faster and for less money
  • Experience world-class education online with more than 175 programs at associate’s, bachelor’s, master’s and doctoral levels.
Purdue Global University

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How Do Students End Up on Academic Probation? 

A range of internal and external factors could lead to academic probation and academic probation transfer. Internal factors are things like anxiety over test taking. And external factors are ones you can’t control. These are a ten more common causes of academic probation. 

1. Entering college with a lack of skills

Researchers from UC Berkeley found that students who took many AP colleges in high school were 3 – 5% more likely to be in good academic standing than those who did not. 

2. Not showing up to class

Skipping too many classes may affect your GPA and standing. Some schools do hold you accountable and may have automatic fail or grade drop policies if you are absent too many times. 

3. Too many classes

Students may sign up for too many classes, not knowing how to juggle the workload. The first year is also a time of transition, new sleeping, eating and study habits. And all these may cause grades to slip.

4. It’s tough to time manage

You may sign up for what you think is a balanced number of credits. But if all the classes entail tons of reading and writing, or long lab sessions, it may overload you. Sometimes an academic advisor can help you create a schedule that is more do able in real time.

5. Too many pass / fail grades

If you opt for a pass / fail instead of a letter grade too many times, it might affect your standing.

6. Poor study habits

Many students try to study in ways that do not fit their personality. According to UC Berkeley, 82% of students on first year probation say poor study habits were obstacles to their success. 

7. Mental health and illness

Another 82% of students on probation say they felt stressed, depressed or upset. Illness, family emergencies and other personal health issues could also cause a chain of events that cause performance to fall. 

8. Completing too few credits

Sometimes dropping too many classes can cause your GPA to dip as well. To this point, it helps to know in advance how may credits you must complete each term. 

9. Too much partying

Late nights, hangovers and too much socializing can take a toll – on the body and on grades. Add noisy roommate drama and it may hinder your grades too.

10. Lack of interest

Some classes may motivate you and others may bore you to tears. It may be harder to put effort in when your interest isn’t high, but this could risk your GPA especially if it is a core class or part of your major.

1

Southern New Hampshire University

  • Take advantage of some of the nation’s most affordable tuition rates, while earning a degree from a private, nonprofit, NEASC accredited university
  • Generous transfer policy, accepting up to 90 credits; the university also partners with community colleges for easy transfer.
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2

Purdue Global University

  • Competency-based ExcelTrack™ Programs may allow you to earn your degree faster and for less money
  • Experience world-class education online with more than 175 programs at associate’s, bachelor’s, master’s and doctoral levels.
Purdue Global University

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How to Get Off Academic Probation 

Often, an academic probation warning spells out your next steps. These steps may differ between schools and students but are likely to refer to GPA policies. Schools may have two GPA policies for students on academic probation. These are: 

Overall GPA policy

A common GPA to meet is 2.0 on a 4.0 scale. This means that your cumulative GPA from all terms at that one college must be at least 2.0 by the end of each semester or quarter. Bringing your grades up to this level may take you off academic probation.

Term GPA policy

Term GPA s the cumulative grade received at the end of a given academic term. You may have to make progress towards this goal while also meeting the overall GPA asks. If you do, it may show the school enough effort on your part that they extend your probation period. Another thing to keep track of is a probation timeline. This varies too and some online colleges (Walden is one) won’t let you progress if you don’t pass the first course in your curriculum. 

Tips to Improve Academic Performance 

Once on academic probation, there are a few things that may help improve your grades.

  • Get some advice. Meet with advisors and faculty and ask for guidance.
  • Stop skipping class. Go to class. 
  • Speak up. Take part in a discussion, ask a question. 
  • Get a study buddy. Or join a study group to keep you accountable. 
  • Look for a tutor. Many colleges have tutoring centers to help you grasp key concepts.  
  • Block off time. Set time aside in a more official way to help you balance study with free time fun. 
  • Retake a course. If you can raise your GPA by retaking a course, this may be an option. 
  • Complete a course. Incomplete grades may equal failing grades so make sure you work with your professor to finish what you started.

How to Stay Off Academic Probation

Once you are off academic probation, celebrate your success and keep it going.

  • Use a planner. There are apps or paper planners where you can keep track of due dates, exams etc.
  • Tap into help networks. Colleges may have health centers, tutors, advisors and resources that you can turn to for help. 
  • Touch base with teachers. Many teachers keep office hours, or you may reach them by email to answer questions and concerns.  
  • Book routine advising sessions. Keep a handle on your schedule, issues, goals and workflow through regular advising sessions.  

How Can Academic Probation Affect Financial Aid? 

Many forms of aid including scholarships require students to be in good academic standing. Since academic probation is a warning that grades are falling, it does risk loss of financial aid. The Pell Grant is one example. It is money you typically do not repay to the federal gov’t.  

Unless you fail to meet conditions. Like you withdraw early from the program for which you got the grant. Or, you change your enrollment status. Also, you cannot renew a Pell Grant id you do not make “satisfactory academic progress.” Given, each school may define progress differently. 

To stay eligible or become re eligible for financial aid after academic probation you are likely to have to: 

  • Meet and keep up the acceptable GPA stated by your college (such as 2.0)
  • Move towards graduation by taking a specified number of credits per year or term 
  • Avoid incomplete (“I”) grades and withdrawals 

1

Southern New Hampshire University

  • Take advantage of some of the nation’s most affordable tuition rates, while earning a degree from a private, nonprofit, NEASC accredited university
  • Generous transfer policy, accepting up to 90 credits; the university also partners with community colleges for easy transfer.
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Purdue Global University

  • Competency-based ExcelTrack™ Programs may allow you to earn your degree faster and for less money
  • Experience world-class education online with more than 175 programs at associate’s, bachelor’s, master’s and doctoral levels.
Purdue Global University

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FAQs on Academic Probation 

What should I do now? 

Make sure you understand the conditions outlined in your academic standing letter and focus on improving in the next quarter.

What GPA will get me into academic probation, and what GPA do I need to get out? 

A GPA of 1.5 to 1.99 when the minimum is 2.0 may get you onto academic probation. So, depending on where yours fall, you may need to bring it to 2.0. Some schools (UC Santa Cruz is one) have a GPA Calculator tool on the student portal to determine the exact grades you need to earn. 

Does a W affect academic probation?

W for withdrawal from a class means you get no grade or credits, so it may not affect your GPA. But there may be policies about how many withdrawals a student is allowed. 

How long does it take to get out of academic probation?

our college’s Registrar’s Office may set a time limit (E.g. one semester, two semesters).  

What happens if my GPA doesn’t improve when I’m on academic probation? 

In some schools, you face suspension and or dismissal if you do not improve your GPA. It may also disqualify you from your major.  

Can I take summer classes to improve my academic standing? 

In general, yes and it may be a perfect plan. Just check with your advisor and college policies first.

What is a second academic probation?

It tends to mean your GPA falls below 2.0 for two semesters in a row. 

Is it possible to graduate while on Academic Probation? 

It is very unlikely you can graduate while on academic probation. One school that says “no” is the American Military University (AMU). 

Open Curriculum Colleges

Open Curriculum Colleges

Check Out Our List Of Colleges With An Open Curriculum. Then Get Matched For FREE To Online Colleges.

 

 

What are Open Curriculum Colleges?

Open curriculum colleges are ones that let you to choose your own classes. You may still have to declare a major, but you may direct your own course plan. Depending on the college, an open curriculum may allow you to craft your own major too. Some schools (Cornell is one) call this an “individualized major.” Here, you don’t have to commit to a major offered by the school. Instead, you may be able to choose topics that make sense to your unique plans goals for your career.  

Open Curriculum vs Core Curriculum

A core curriculum differs from an open curriculum as it typically specifies courses you must take. You have to satisfy these credits to earn your degree. What that means is that all undergrads take a set of common (core) classes. Core classes tend to include general education (GE) topics. Like math, science, social studies and foreign language.  

You have to take these courses no matter what major or school within a college. The idea behind this is that when you study these subjects, it helps to mold a well rounded learner. In an open curriculum, you may not have GE classes. And, in some cases, you don’t have to use a formula for how you use credits. 

That doesn’t mean you don’t choose a major or focus. But when you do, you may not have to meet any core requirements. Since you may not have to take these common classes, you may have more credits to play with. So, many students pursue a double major with room to explore both in a deep way. 

How Do Open Curriculum Colleges Work? 

In an open curriculum college, academic advisors typically help you choose courses around a professional goal. This goal might be a desire to blend two areas like chemistry and bio. Or, you want to learn how to raise money, impact public policy, or get into law school. 

While not the same as independent study, an open C is flexible. Mostly in the area of lower division classes. A school may allow you to replace honors and advanced courses in their place. With the format, many schools accept only those students with strong grades. So, you may need to show case talents, interests and goals to get in. And some schools expect you to write a proposal that explains how your classes all fit together.  

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Southern New Hampshire University

  • Take advantage of some of the nation’s most affordable tuition rates, while earning a degree from a private, nonprofit, NEASC accredited university.
  • Generous transfer policy, accepting up to 90 credits; the university also partners with community colleges for easy transfer..
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University of Arizona Global Campus

  • Accredited University offering Associate’s, Bachelor’s and Master’s Degrees
  • Affordable tuition, 5-6 week courses, and various payment options
  • 80+ online programs
Ashford University

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Is an Open Curriculum College Right for you?

If you are a self starter and like flexibility, an open curriculum may be perfect. As a rule, it offers a very broad based liberal arts education. And, is one you could mold to the topics you can’t wait to learn about. Liberal arts topics often relate to big ideas, themes, events, arts and culture. You also read and write a lot. And this may help you grow as a thinker, problem solver and communicator.

On the other hand, a core curriculum provides more structure. You tend to have GE classes to fill as well as ones in your major and focus. This path may suit you if you prefer to map a journey out in advance. Or if you want to dive into one technical area and learn about it from different sides.

30 Open Curriculum Colleges

We used data from the US Department of Education to create a list of the 30 Open Curriculum Colleges.  

1 Amherst College
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Amherst College is a four year private, liberal arts school with 1,855 undergrads. In MA, the school offers 36 fields of study. Some programs include economics, math and English.

Open Curriculum Requirements

Amherst has no distribution requirements and no core curriculum. Instead, students may choose the courses that matter to them the most. With over 850 courses to choose from, many students pursue a double major. 

Open Curriculum Programs

Anthropology, Buddhist Studies, Asian Pacific American Studies.

Tuition & Fees

$25,208

Financial Aid

Yes, if eligible

Grad Rate

95%

 

 

2 Brown University
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Brown U is a four year private school with 6,752 undergrads and is known for robust research. The campus, in RI offers 57 fields of study. Some choices are economics, comp sci, applied math and bio. 

Open Curriculum Requirements

Students may develop a customized course of study with the freedom to study what they choose. 

Open Curriculum Programs

Engineering, Behavioral Decision Sciences, Biophysics, Classics.

Tuition & Fees

$31,685

Financial Aid

Yes, if eligible

Grad Rate

97%

 

3 Grinnell College
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Grinnel is a four year private school with 1,683 undergrads. In IA, it offers 30 fields of study in the liberal arts. A few of these areas are economics, poli sci, comp sci and bio. 

Open Curriculum Requirments

Grinnell believes in free inquiry and the open exchange of ideas. All students take a First Year Tutorial, and this is the only required class.

Open Curriculum Programs

American Studies, Bio, Art History. 

Tuition & Fees

$25,358

Financial Aid

Yes, if eligible

Grad Rate

87%

 

4 Hamilton College
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Hamilton is a four year private school in NY, with 1,989 undergrads. A liberal arts school, it offers 37 fields of study in the liberal arts. Some choices include economics, math, poli sci and language.  

Open Curriculum Requirements

You need to pass 3 writing courses. By the end of your second year, you must also complete at least one quantitative and symbolic reasoning course. The school also wants you to take part in the First Year Course and Proseminar programs. You must also take a range of liberal arts classes that support cultural analysis and need to choose a focus. The program caps with a senior project.

Open Curriculum Programs

Astronomy, Art History, Digital Arts and Cinema. 

Tuition & Fees

$25,160

Financial Aid

Yes, if eligible

Grad Rate

92%

 

5 Hampshire College
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Hampshire is a four year private school with 1,175 undergrads. In MA it offers 51 fields of study. Among these areas are film and video, fine and studio arts and writing studies.  

Open Curriculum Requirements

Students may design their own program with the 5 College Consortium that includes Dance, Film, Astronomy and Architectural Studies. 

Open Curriculum Programs

Marine Science, Entrepreneurship, Applied Design and Music.

Tuition & Fees

$28,173

Financial Aid

Yes, if eligible

Grad Rate

68%

 

6 NYU Gallatin School of Individualized Study
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NYU is a four year private school that serves 26,339 undergrads. In NYC, it offers 152 fields of study in liberal arts, sciences, business and beyond. Within NYU, this school is a smaller unit for BA and MA students.

Open Curriculum Requirements

You will consult with advisors to develop a program of study centered around a theme, problem, activity or idea. To mark your progress, there are marked expectations for each year of study. And, at the end of your final year, there is a final project.  

Open Curriculum Programs

Liberal Arts, Humanities, Social Sciences, Math.

Tuition & Fees

$42,397

Financial Aid

Yes, if eligible

Grad Rate

85%

 

7 Smith College
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Smith is a four year private liberal arts school with 2,496 undergrads and 49 fields of study. In MA it is one of the largest women’s colleges in the US. While the school also admits male students, this policy applies to grad programs only. Some of the undergrad programs are in psych, economics, bio and languages.  

Open Curriculum Requirements

You have the freedom to customize your studies drawing from social sciences, history, arts, languages, literature, math and natural science.

Open Curriculum Programs

Africana Studies, Comp Sci and Dance.  

Tuition & Fees

$28,193

Financial Aid

Yes, if eligible

Grad Rate

88%

 

1

Southern New Hampshire University

  • Take advantage of some of the nation’s most affordable tuition rates, while earning a degree from a private, nonprofit, NEASC accredited university
  • Generous transfer policy, accepting up to 90 credits; the university also partners with community colleges for easy transfer.
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Purdue Global University

  • Competency-based ExcelTrack™ Programs may allow you to earn your degree faster and for less money
  • Experience world-class education online with more than 175 programs at associate’s, bachelor’s, master’s and doctoral levels.
Purdue Global University

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8 University of Rochester
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U Rochester is a four year private school with 6,348 undergrads. In NY, the school offers 66 fields of study (and 12 libraries). Of these, registered nursing, bio, economics and music are some that they offer.

Open Curriculum Requirements

You work with an advisor to design their plan of study. There are no gen ed classes to take though you do select a major and many opt to pursue a double or triple major.

Open Curriculum Programs

Humanities, Social Science and Natural Sciences.

Tuition & Fees

$29,373

Financial Aid

Yes, if eligible

Grad Rate

88%

 

9 Vassar College
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Vassar is a four year private school with 2,436 undergrads. In NY, it offers 43 fields of study. Some of these are economics, poli sci, psych and bio. 

Open Curriculum Requirements

General curricular requirements are flexible. But you must fulfill three requirements. Freshman writing, a quantitative course and foreign language.

Open Curriculum Programs

Anthropology, Cognitive Science, English, Film.

Tuition & Fees

$27,808

Financial Aid

Yes, if eligible

Grad Rate

91%

 

10 Wake Forest University 
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Wake Forrest is a four year private school with 5,225 undergrads. In NC, it offers 35 fields of study. Some programs are economics, communication, psych and finance.  

Open Curriculum Requirements

You will work with faculty advisors to craft a broad plan of study and declare a major in your second year.

Open Curriculum Programs

Applied Math, Bioethics, Journalism, Health Policy. 

Tuition & Fees

$32,129

Financial Aid

Yes, if eligible

Grad Rate

88% 

 

11 Weselyan University
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Wesleyan is a four year private school with 2,922 undergrads, In CT, it offers 36 fields of study. Some majors are economics, area studies, English and poli sci.  

Open Curriculum Requirements

Students may create their own plan for gen ed but must satisfy some disbursement requirements. 

Open Curriculum Programs

Applied Data, Film Studies, Religion, Theatre.

Tuition & Fees

$26,291

Financial Aid

Yes, if eligible

Grad Rate

93%

 

12 James Madison University
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James Madison U is a four year, public school with 19,679 undergrads. In VA it offers 46 fields of study, some available online. Of these, the some majors are in mental and social health services, communications and liberal arts.  

Open Curriculum Requirements

You must take gen ed classes in five cluster areas. As long as you meet the GE credits, you may take courses in any area.

Open Curriculum Programs

Geology, Philosophy, Hospitality Management. 

Tuition & Fees

$21,281

Financial Aid

Yes, if eligible

Grad Rate

83%

 

 

13 California College of the Arts
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California College of the Arts is a four year school with 1,453 undergrads. In San Francisco, this small school offers 9 fields of study. A few are design, fine and studio arts, graphics and architecture.  

Open Curriculum Requirements

Some programs map out a first year core curriculum.

Open Curriculum Programs

Architecture, Fine Arts, Design, Humanities and Science. 

Tuition & Fees

$35,458

Financial Aid

Yes, if eligible

Grad Rate

65%

 

14 University of Washington
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U Washington is a four year public school with 30,905 undergrads in their main campus in Seattle. Out of 136 fields of study, some area include psych, communication, biochemistry and economics. 

Open Curriculum Requirements

You may need at least three credits in a ‘diversity’ study area.  

Open Curriculum Programs

Arts, Humanities, Natural Sciences, Social Sciences. 

Tuition & Fees

$12,001

Financial Aid

Yes, if eligible

Grad Rate

83%

 

15 Cornell College
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Cornell College is a four year private school that has 1,022 undergrads. In IA, the school offers 40 fields of study. Economics, psych, health and biochem are some. 

Open Curriculum Requirements

There are specific requirements to follow but you have some flexibility in how to fill them. 

Open Curriculum Programs

Pre Health Sciences, Law and Society, Business, Literacy Arts. 

Tuition & Fees

$27,204

Financial Aid

Yes, if eligible

Grad Rate

68%

 

1

Southern New Hampshire University

  • Take advantage of some of the nation’s most affordable tuition rates, while earning a degree from a private, nonprofit, NEASC accredited university
  • Generous transfer policy, accepting up to 90 credits; the university also partners with community colleges for easy transfer.
Sanhu-university

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2

Purdue Global University

  • Competency-based ExcelTrack™ Programs may allow you to earn your degree faster and for less money
  • Experience world-class education online with more than 175 programs at associate’s, bachelor’s, master’s and doctoral levels.
Purdue Global University

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16 CUNY
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The City University of New York, aka CUNY, is a four year public school with 12,503 undergrads in its NYC campus. A large school, it offers 57 fields of study in areas are psych, bio, liberal arts and sciences.  

Open Curriculum Requirements

You need to complete a Common Core, but there may be some flexibility around course choice.

Open Curriculum Programs

World Culture, Liberal Arts, Business, Finance.

Tuition & Fees

$3,744

Financial Aid

Yes, if eligible

Grad Rate

49%

 

17 Indiana University Bloomington
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Indiana U Bloomington is a four year public school with 32, 991 undergrads. There are 87 fields of study to choose from. Among them are business, public administration, computer and info sciences.  

Open Curriculum Requirements

You must satisfy Common Ground gen ed classes. 

Open Curriculum Programs

Accounting, Advertising, Music, Web Programming

Tuition & Fees

$13,428

Financial Aid

Yes, if eligible

Grad Rate

78%

 

18 Lesley University
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Lesley U is a four year private school with 2,108 undergrads. In MA, the school offers 33 fields of study. Some options are liberal arts and sciences, psych, business and design. 

Open Curriculum Requirements

You may need to take required foundation credits.

Open Curriculum Programs

Art and Design, English, Math, Counseling.

Tuition & Fees

$32,289

Financial Aid

Yes, if eligible

Grad Rate

60%

 

19 Marlboro College
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Marlboro College in Vermont is a four year private school with 140 undergrads. The school offers 55 programs with options that include visual arts, film and video, political science.  

Open Curriculum Requirements

You must show you can write clearly and effectively by the end of the first three semesters. 

Open Curriculum Programs

Art History, Languages, Classics, Computer Science.

Tuition & Fees

$17,497

Financial Aid

Yes, if eligible

Grad Rate

64%

 

20 Evergreen State College
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Evergreen State College is a four year public school with 2, 962 undergrads. In WA, the school offers two main fields of study. Liberal arts and sciences; and biological and physical sciences.  

Open Curriculum Requirements

Students could layer interests and their degree. 

Open Curriculum Programs

Architecture, Art History, Bio, Leadership Studies.  

Tuition & Fees

$12,500

Financial Aid

Yes, if eligible

Grad Rate

68%

 

21 Warren Wilson College
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Warren Wilson College, in NC, serves 635 undergrads. While a small school , they offer 21 fields of study. Some of these are in natural resources conservation, bio and psych. 

Open Curriculum Requirements

You will take a liberal arts core, on campus work and community engagement. There is an option to also pursue a self designed major.

Open Curriculum Programs

Contemporary Writers, Leadership, Environmental Law, Business.

Tuition & Fees

$26,017

Financial Aid

Yes, if eligible

Grad Rate

53%

 

22 University of Maryland
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U Maryland is a four year public school with a main campus in Baltimore that has 11,156 undergrads. Here you may choose from 62 fields of study. Some are bio, psych, comp sci, and info sciences.   

Open Curriculum Requirements

You must complete core credits and UMBC electives, but these may vary between programs.

Open Curriculum Programs

Africana Studies, Modern Languages, Education, English.

Tuition & Fees

$18,706

Financial Aid

Yes, if eligible

Grad Rate

64%

 

23 University of Michigan
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U Michigan is a four year public school. The Ann Arbor campus has 30,079 undergrads and there are 81 fields of study. Areas include research psych, comp and info science, business admin and economics.  

Open Curriculum Requirements

You need to follow some guidelines related to writing, language, major, diversity and residence. 

Open Curriculum Programs

Humanities, Natural Sciences, Social Sciences, General Studies. 

Tuition & Fees

$16,010

Financial Aid

Yes, if eligible

Grad Rate

92%

 

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Southern New Hampshire University

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  • Generous transfer policy, accepting up to 90 credits; the university also partners with community colleges for easy transfer..
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University of Arizona Global Campus

  • Accredited University offering Associate’s, Bachelor’s and Master’s Degrees
  • Affordable tuition, 5-6 week courses, and various payment options
  • 80+ online programs
Ashford University

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24 Hanover College
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Hanover College is a four year private school with 1,099 undergrads. In IN, the school is affiliated with the Presbyterian Church. They offer a liberal arts education and option to design your own major. Among the 34 available fields of study are physical ed, media studies, psych and economics.  

Open Curriculum Requirements

You may have to follow some guidelines but programs are interdisciplinary. 

Open Curriculum Programs

Art and Design, History, English, Pre Law, Humanities.

Tuition & Fees

$21,121

Financial Aid

Yes, if eligible

Grad Rate

67%

 

25 Swarthmore College
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Swarthmore College is a four year private school with 1,544 undergrads. In PA, the school offers 60 fields of study. Some of these are economics, comp sci, bio and math.  

Open Curriculum Requirements

You need to fulfill distribution, physical education, and foreign language requirements in order to graduate. 

Open Curriculum Programs

Comparative Literature, Global Studies, Engineering, Art History. 

Tuition & Fees

$21,067

Financial Aid

Yes, if eligible

Grad Rate

95%

 

26 UC San Diego
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UC San Diego is a four year public school with 30,279 undergrads. In La Jolla, the school offers 65 fields of study. Among them are comp sci, economics, bio and biochemistry.  

Open Curriculum Requirements

You must follow some guidelines for core credits and may declare a second major.  

Open Curriculum Programs

International Studies, Global Health, Literature, Poli Sci.  

Tuition & Fees

$13,318

Financial Aid

Yes, if eligible

Grad Rate

89%

 

27 Oberlin College
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Oberlin College is a four year private school. In OH, it serves 2,785 undergrads and offers 38 fields of study. Among these are music, bio, poli sci and natural resources.  

Open Curriculum Requirements

You must follow some guidelines to develop balanced programs.  

Open Curriculum Programs

Cinema Studies, Creative Writing, Book Studies, Comparative American Studies. 

Tuition & Fees

$35,555

Financial Aid

Yes, if eligible

Grad Rate

87%

 

28 St. Olaf College
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St. Olaf College is a four year private school serving 3,022 undergrads. In MN the school offers 33 fields of study. Some are bio, economics, psych and math.  

Open Curriculum Requirements

You must take some foundation and core classes. 

Open Curriculum Programs

Film Studies, Linguistic Studies, Classics, English.

Tuition & Fees

$23,386

Financial Aid

Yes, if eligible

Grad Rate

88%

 

29 The University of Minnesota
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U Minnesota is a four year public school. The main campus in MN serves 31,451 undergrads. Of the 148 fields of study are psych, economics, comp sci and bio. 

Open Curriculum Requirements

You need to complete liberal education and second language requirements.  

Open Curriculum Programs

Liberal Arts, Science, Sociology, Technical Writing.

Tuition & Fees

$17,479

Financial Aid

Yes, if eligible

Grad Rate

78%

 

30 UC Berkley
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UC Berkeley is a four year public school with 30,845 undergrads. There are 75 fields of study to choose from. Among them are economics, cell bio, comp sci, and engineering.  

Open Curriculum Requirements

You have to meet some guidelines for core classes and ones for your major. 

Open Curriculum Programs

Comparative Literature, Arts and Humanities, Social Sciences.

Tuition & Fees

$14,846

Financial Aid

Yes, if eligible

Grad Rate

93%

 

What is the College Score Card?

What is the College Score Card?

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What is the College Score Card? 

The college score card is an online tool set up by the US Department of Education. It is also a vast database where you peek behind the scenes and find out about colleges. What programs they offer, student body, costs, admissions, results, and more. 

Strengths and Weaknesses of the Data on College Score Card

A strength of the college score card is that it makes higher education data visible. As this leads to more transparency, if you use it wisely, the tool may be an asset. As a rule, the tool tends to provide a broad sense of how costs compare. But experts note it may not help you predict what a college will cost you as an individual. 

The main reason is that the costs described are net costs. Not the actual price marked on the website. Net price is the school’s average annual cost. Things like tuition, living costs, books and fees. Minus the average grants and scholarships for federal financial aid recipients.  

A weakness of the tool is the limit to the data. In many cases, the metrics represent school reported information. And this may not be complete or accurate, according to disclaimers by the USDE.

Take away? The college score card may be an useful jumping off point. You might use it to narrow down your list for further research. One resource to use is the College Navigator. It is a tool from the National Center for Education Statistics and may cover some of your other questions about a college.

How to Navigate the College Score Card Data 

As its name suggests, the college score card looks like a card and has icons and numbers on it. It also has a search bar and links to resources. Apart from the search bar, the homepage has a bottom section with resources. You can find out about careers and apprenticeships. Or, click to learn more about federal financial aid. Financial aid may be available to those who qualify.

Here is a walk through on how you might use the college score card data in your college search.  

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Southern New Hampshire University

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University of Arizona Global Campus

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  • Affordable tuition, 5-6 week courses, and various payment options
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1. Find the college you want to learn about 

To use the college score card, the first thing you want to do is search for a college you want to attend. This info is on the homepage and allows you to locate a school one of three ways.

  • Custom search. Search by location, field of study and the kind of degree you want. Certificate, associate or bachelor.
  • Name search. Plug in the name of the school you want information about.
  • Show me options. The more personalized route. It allows you to check boxes about location, how many people get in, most people graduate, and type of degree.

If the college has a few campuses, you can refine your search and look at one location vs another too. 

2. How to read each card 

There are four sections to each card. A header, a set of icons, metrics and a prompt that says, “view more details”. The top header of the card shows the college location. Underneath that is the university name and right below it, the number of undergrads. Icons, of which there are four, speak to the type of college it is. Things like two or four year, private or public college, city or rural area and size of the college.

Below the icons, you will see three sets of metrics. You can open each section to learn more.

  • Graduation rate. This is the share of students who graduated within 8 years of entering this school for the first time.
  • Salary after completing. This data shows the median annual earning of former students one year after graduation. But the data is only from those who received federal financial aid.
  • Average annual cost. The average annual net price that a student who gets federal financial aid pays to cover expenses (tuition and living expenses). For public schools, this is the average cost for in state students.  

At the end of the card, if you select “view more details”, the card opens up to a new screen. 

3. Make sense of the big screen 

When you open the card up, the screen is bigger and has more features. You can add a school with the button, ‘+ compare’. Or share the school, if you want someone else to look at it. There’s also a handy prompt that says, “start my FAFSA form”. And you can look into military benefits to help you pay for school too. You’ll also see your chosen school on a map. The map does not allow you to plan a commute. But it does give you an idea of where the college lives and if there are landmarks nearby. 

Some of the other pull downs from the menu delve deeper into data.

  • Costs. Here you calculate your personal net price and figure out what students in your income bracket may pay.
  • Graduation and retention. This part shows you the number of students who return after their first year. So, higher numbers may indicate a robust culture of motivated students.
  • Financial aid and debt. In this tab, you can see the typical monthly loan payment and info about student debt after graduation.
  • Salary after completing by field of study. A bar that shows typical earnings in the first year of graduation for programs where there is data.
  • Fields of study. Fields of study represent programs but may not map in a direct way to actual course catalogs.
  • Student body. This gives you an idea of the racial and ethnic mix of a college. Also, it shows you how many eligible low income students received federal Pell Grants
  • Test scores and acceptance. A chart of the ACT / SAT score ranges that admitted and enrolled students reported.

1

Southern New Hampshire University

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  • Generous transfer policy, accepting up to 90 credits; the university also partners with community colleges for easy transfer.
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Purdue Global University

  • Competency-based ExcelTrack™ Programs may allow you to earn your degree faster and for less money
  • Experience world-class education online with more than 175 programs at associate’s, bachelor’s, master’s and doctoral levels.
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4. View more details  

If you want to dig deeper, you might click the blue “i” button or the button that says, “view more details”. Of the two, “I”, which stands for ‘information’, leads to a whole new menu. Here is a brief breakdown of what to expect on this page.

Data documentation. College scorecard provides data at two levels. The institution level and the field of study level. If you want more technical details, this section offers it.

Change log. As a rule, the USDE updates the college score card a few times per year. So, on this page, you can check if their data is recent. At last check, their last date stamp was March 30, 2020.

Glossary. The glossary explains each of the terms used on the college score card. It can be useful to help you understand where the data came from and how it was compiled.

Internet Safety Tips For Students

15 Must Know Internet Safety Tips For Students

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Internet Safety Tips for Students

The rise of cyber crime means internet safety tips for students are more important than ever. In case you didn’t know, there is a hacker attack every 39 seconds. That’s less time than it takes to post a selfie. As you’re probably spending even more time online, you should know how to watch your device’s back. Here are a few suggestions on how to stay safe while you surf. For even more info, check out our 12 Must Know Facts About Cyber Security.  

15 Must Know Internet Safety Tips for Students

These are some of the ways students can stay safe on the internet. 

#1. Be careful what you share  

Think of the internet as a room full of (millions of) complete strangers. They could be future friends, employers or that person who steals your phone out of your jeans. Remember, there is no delete button on the internet. So, once you share your address and personal status, it is there for anyone to see. The same goes for an embarrassing selfie, swear word or rude comment. As a general rule, you don’t want to put things ‘out there’ that you wouldn’t want your mom or future boss to see.

#2. Check your privacy settings

Privacy settings function like doors. You close a door to keep people out, or open it to allow people in. If you don’t ‘close the door’, marketers and hackers can find out a lot about you. Things like your browsing habits to social media usage. Each platform is distinct, but you can often find these settings under your profile icon. When you check, make sure to ‘enable’ these safeguards. Boston University also suggests you disable geo tagging. Geo tagging basically lets anyone know where you are (or aren’t) at any given time.

#3. Browse with caution

Browsing is like walking around. Some paths are safe, and others are not. Cyber criminals often hide behind explicit or “juicy” content. You think it’s ok to click even though you don’t know it leads to a trusted site. A careless click could expose your personal data or infect your device with malware. So, resist the urge to follow unknown links or respond to senders you don’t know.

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Southern New Hampshire University

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  • Generous transfer policy, accepting up to 90 credits; the university also partners with community colleges for easy transfer..
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#4. Use secure networks

It’s tempting to use public WiFi because it is free, but it isn’t always secure. Secured networks tend to ask for something in return. You might have to agree to legal terms, register an account or type in a password. Using unsecured ones expose you to hackers. These are real people who watch traffic to intercept your personal data. If they succeed, they can steal passwords, bank card pin number and credit card details.  

#5. Think about a VPN

If you use a laptop and rely on public WiFi, think about a VPN. A VPN is a virtual private network. It can protect your identity, info and internet protocol (IP) address. VPNs connect your device and an internet server where no one can read your data. It does this by scrambling the data you send out so that you have more privacy.

#6. Go slow with downloads

Gamers, this one is for you. It is the mission of cyber criminals to trick you into downloading malware. Malware are programs or apps that carry some kind of virus that steals your info. A solid rule of thumb is to avoid downloading suspicious software or apps. Especially if it isn’t from a trusted site, one you know. If you have to use a public computer, delete any files you downloaded or saved too.

#7. Make strong passwords

We tend to want to use passwords that are easy to remember. Sadly, weak passwords are also easy for hackers to guess. Strong passwords, by comparison, act like a lock on a door. Sometimes, your device will suggest a strong password. It is likely one that uses a complex chain of numbers, letters and special characters. You can use this one or follow that lead, then store your passwords in a password manager software if it helps. That said, never store your passwords on the websites you visit on public computers. And always log out before you leave these sites. 

#8. Look for https: when you shop online

Any time you shop online and have to use your credit card you want to check if the site is secure. To know if a site is secure, you can look for one of two things. The first shows up in the site URL address as ‘https:’ not ‘http:’ (the ‘s’ is for secure). And the second is a padlock icon. You can also search for reviews to make sure the site is reputable.  

#9. Think twice about accepting invites

In 2019, Facebook pulled down more than 3 billion fake accounts. Fake profiles help bad actors spread untruths as well as access your information. To avoid this pitfall, be cautious about accepting random invites. You can be sensible about your online social life just as you are offline.

#10. Turn auto update on

The people who code viruses and malware know how to get it out there. So, all your connected devices should have updated antivirus, operating system and apps. These add a layer of security. Especially since newer versions tend detect and remove newer kinds of malware, viruses and threats.

#11. Check all your statements

In 2018, over 2.5 billion user accounts were hacked. It’s serious since user accounts can contain your name, bank or credit card number, social insurance number, phone number. To stay on top of this, check all your statements to see if all charges are legit. Suspicious activity may show up as a very small charge at first. But if it goes undetected, can turn into bigger ticket issues.

#12. Keep a backup

As a student, one of your worst nightmares is to work on a project and lose everything right before it’s due. Instead of this scenario, store your work on the cloud or on an external hard drive. A cloud system is a virtual framework that stores data. Most have firewalls, anti virus software, monitoring and host intrusion protection.

#13. Protect against ransomware

Ransomware is a form of malicious software. What it does is lock and encrypt a victim’s computer or device data. Then, demand a ransom to restore access. The tips we mentioned above can prevent against ransomware from holding your data hostage. You also want to be wary of any email attachment that advises you to enable macros to view its content. Once enabled, macro malware can infect many files. As a solid prevention tactic, hit ‘delete’ instead.

1

Southern New Hampshire University

  • Take advantage of some of the nation’s most affordable tuition rates, while earning a degree from a private, nonprofit, NEASC accredited university
  • Generous transfer policy, accepting up to 90 credits; the university also partners with community colleges for easy transfer.
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Purdue Global University

  • Competency-based ExcelTrack™ Programs may allow you to earn your degree faster and for less money
  • Experience world-class education online with more than 175 programs at associate’s, bachelor’s, master’s and doctoral levels.
Purdue Global University

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#14. Be a guest user

Data breaches hit businesses and retailers alike. According to Shape Security, retailers reported (in 2018) that 80 to 90% of their login activity was malicious. To stay safe when you shop, remain a guest user. This way, you don’t have to store personal data in the first place.

#15. Protect your devices too

One of the simplest internet security tips for students is to protect your devices. That includes your smart phone, tablet or laptop. Yes, a cable lock adds a layer of protection. But it does not prevent someone from walking away with your hardware. Leaving any of these unattended in public or in an unlocked dorm room is a tried and true ‘no no’. And if you have to leave something behind, put it out of sight. 

The History of Online Learning

The History of Online Learning

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The history of online learning is now more relevant than ever with recent events. Today, more than one third of all students taking at least one online course.

But success for online students may be a bit different than acing your courses on campus. Here’s what to expect and how to prepare!

First of all, online learning isn’t new or easy.

That’s a common misconception. Sure, online courses could possibly make your life easier, by offering a flexible way to study. But the course contents may be the same as what you’d learn on campus.

And, online students might have some unique challenges. (We’ll get to those, later!)

Does that mean you shouldn’t try it? Of course not! Just don’t assume that online learning will be less work than a traditional college program.

1

Southern New Hampshire University

  • Take advantage of some of the nation’s most affordable tuition rates, while earning a degree from a private, nonprofit, NEASC accredited university
  • Generous transfer policy, accepting up to 90 credits; the university also partners with community colleges for easy transfer.
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Purdue Global University

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  • Experience world-class education online with more than 175 programs at associate’s, bachelor’s, master’s and doctoral levels.
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covid19 online learning infographic

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Pick Your Learning Format

First, decide which online class format is perfect for you – or try both kinds!

  • Synchronous learning. This means “at the same time.” You’ll need to show up to virtual class meetings, using videoconferencing. A benefit of this format is live participation. You can chat with your instructors and classmates in real time.
  • Asynchronous learning. This means “not at the same time.” In this type of course, you’ll watch prerecorded lessons – on your own schedule. It’s more flexible, which many students love. And, you can still engage with your prof and peers.  

Know Your Tech Tools

As an online learner, your technology tools are your best friends. That doesn’t mean you need the very latest device. But, your laptop, desktop computer, or tablet must support your online course’s requirements. That means being able to install and run any software you need for the course.

And it goes without saying: you’ll need a reliable internet connection.

Having tech challenges? Most colleges and universities have resources to help. That could mean anything from lending you a Wi-Fi hotspot to giving each student a laptop. And, know how to reach your school’s tech support team if you need help.

81% of U.S. college students said digital learning technologies helped them boost their grades

Make Space to Study

Campus students have computer labs and study lounges. As an online learner, much of your study time will probably be spent at home.

You can create the perfect study space with:

  • An ergonomic desk chair
  • A desk that’s the right height for you
  • A power strip to charge devices
  • Plants (for cleaner air!)
  • Inspirational posters
  • A water bottle to stay hydrated
  • Noise-cancelling headphones (goodbye, distractions!)
  • Anything else that helps you focus

It’s also important to set boundaries – especially if you’re the go-to person in your family. Make sure your kids, spouse, parents, or pets know when you need quiet time to finish your assignments.

Practice Online Learning Success Skills

Online learners may need to build new skills – like how to stop procrastination before it starts. Or how to ask for help with a new concept. Or how to stay motivated while studying at home.

It’s not that traditional students don’t need to learn these things, too. They do. But as an online learner, you might have to try a little harder. It’s not as easy to turn to the person next to you to ask a question, or stay a few minutes after class to talk to the professor.

But you can still get the most out of your classes and have an amazing college experience.

Here are 6 success skills every online learner should know:

  • How to connect with peers online: Everything from starting a social media group to scheduling virtual meetups could help you stay in touch.
  • How to get help with something: Be proactive about asking for a hand – whether it’s tutoring, tech support, or just a question you want answered.
  • How to manage your time: Set a schedule and stick to it. Use apps (or an old-school agenda book) to help you stay organized, create to-do lists, and reach goals.
  • How to participate: It could be in a virtual class meeting or on an online discussion board. Either way, get comfortable with weighing in!
  • How to avoid distractions: Sometimes willpower needs a little help. Use apps to block social media while you study. Keep your music low. And, avoid doing too many things at once!
  • How to take it one day at a time: Adjusting to online learning happens quickly for some learners. For others, it takes longer. Give yourself time to find your rhythm and the success strategies that work for you!

Student Loan Fraud – Don’t Get Scammed

Avoid Student Loan Fraud

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Student Loan Fraud – Don’t Get Scammed

There are scams promising to end student loan debt – don’t get scammed, get informed. These fake companies pretend to be affiliates of the U.S. Department of Education. But instead, bilk consumers out of millions of dollars. How? They make a false promise of student loan debt relief.

In November 2019, the FTC got a temporary restraining order against a few scammers. Arete Financial Group and some related companies. The Federal Trade Commission alleges these businesses scammed students through:

  • Radio and TV ads
  • Online ads
  • Telemarketing calls

The gist of what these companies do is promise to enroll you in one of their programs. These programs span student loan forgiveness, loan consolidation, and repayment plans. The scammers also promised to reduce or end your monthly loan payments and balance. And, allegedly charged upfront fees as high as $1,800 when consumers agree to sign up.

But instead of delivering promises, the schemers contacted consumers’ loan servicer. Without the consumer’s authorization or knowledge. And had the servicer place the loans into temporary forbearance or deferment status. Luckily the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) has a Bureau of Consumer Protection. As a result of filed claims defendants face charges. Like violating the Telemarketing Sales Rule and the FTC Act.

Student Loan Fraud and Facts

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How to Avoid Student Loan Debt Relief Scams

If you educate yourself about your student loan debt, there is no reason to be a victim of the next scam. Here are a few tips to keep in mind so you don’t get scammed.

#1 Be Aware of “Payment up Front” Scammers

It is illegal for companies to charge you before they help you. And companies may promise to reduce your student debt. But there is nothing they can do for you that you can’t do on your own. And for free.

#2 Check Out Options for Financing College

Before you take out a loan, check out other financial aid sources. Like grants, scholarships, and federal work study programs. A first step is to fill out a Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). You need to create an FSA user account, and when you do, do not share your ID. Dishonest people may use it to log in and hack your account.

#3 Learn About Student Loans

There are two types of loans. Federal loans from the gov’t. And private loans from lenders like banks and credit unions. While federal loans come with some protections, alternative (private) loans do not. Either way, you have to repay the money to your lender.

#4 Understand Loan Forgiveness and Repayment

You may be eligible for a different kind of repayment plan. Or, for your loans to be forgiven. This depends on the kind of loan you have and your situation. To qualify for such options, no company can do something for you that you can’t do yourself. Knowing this can prevent you from falling prey to a scammer.

If you have federal loans, the Department of Education has a few free programs.

  • Income driven repayment plans – monthly payments based on how much money you make
  • Deferment and forbearance – you postpone payments though may incur more interest
  • Loan forgiveness or discharge – these programs let you off the hook, but you have to qualify (E.g. you become disabled or find out your school committed fraud)

For private loans, deal with reputable loan servicers. Keep in mind it is also unlikely the servicer will offer a loan forgiveness program. So, any third party claiming they can do this for you is likely a scammer. Don’t listen and don’t give any third party your account details either.

#5 Be Cautious with Consolidation

When you consolidate a loan, you roll a few loans into one. This gives you a new loan and new repayment terms but may affect your interest rate.

If you consolidate your loans with the federal gov’t it is free. So, if a company offers to do this for a fee, say NO. To consolidate loans with a private lender may cost something. But avoid companies that tell you to pay up front. Also, some debt relief companies and lenders offer to consolidate federal and private loans together. They say they’ll make them into one new loan to lower your monthly payments or interest rate. The FTC says, “Don’t do it.”

Five Things to Remember About Scammers to Avoid Student Loan Fraud

  1. Only scammers promise fast loan forgiveness
  2. Never pay a fee upfront (Think: free not fee)
  3. Use trusted sites – scammers can make fake gov’t seals
  4. Don’t give or share your FSA ID with anyone
  5. You can’t roll federal and private loans together to lower payments
  6. Report scams so others don’t suffer: 1-877-FTC-HELP (382-4357)

What’s the Difference Between a PhD in Psychology and a PsyD?

PhD vs PsyD

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Doctorate Degrees in Psychology

A doctorate in psychology may position you for many careers you can’t access without one. Above all, in ones like clinical, counseling and school psychology. According to the BLS.gov, demand in these fields is on an uptick, with 14% more jobs forecast for 2028. That said, there are two doctorate degree in psychology programs to consider. One is a PhD in psychology, and the other, a Doctor of Psychology or PsyD. Below is a brief description of what to expect from a PhD vs PsyD. Keep your goals and interests in mind as you weigh these options.  

What is a Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) in Psychology?

A PhD is a Doctor of Philosophy and by definition, a research degree. As such, it is less of a “hands on” approach to psychology, and more academic.  

The name for this type of training is the ‘scientist practitioner model’. Instead of clinical work, it stresses inquiry, statistics, testing and data. This makes many PhD in psychology programs both broad and deep. Broad because they cover a wide range of theories and research methods. And deep because you anchor your program in a research interest.

As you learn how to design experiments, there other things you might study too. Such as, the various ways to collect data, analyze it and present your findings in a clear, scientific way. To this point, a PhD caps with a dissertation in which you submit an original theory. You must also defend your paper to colleagues and teachers (with lots of evidence).  

As you might guess, a PhD tends to build expertise in analysis which may be useful in specific careers. Like researcher, educator, consultant and program evaluator.  

Since there are many areas to investigate, as a prospective PhD student, you want to identify yours. When you do, it can help you find programs where the faculty shares your ambitions. Like PTSD, forensics, couples, addicts etc.  

1

Southern New Hampshire University

  • Take advantage of some of the nation’s most affordable tuition rates, while earning a degree from a private, nonprofit, NEASC accredited university
  • Generous transfer policy, accepting up to 90 credits; the university also partners with community colleges for easy transfer.
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Purdue Global University

  • Competency-based ExcelTrack™ Programs may allow you to earn your degree faster and for less money
  • Experience world-class education online with more than 175 programs at associate’s, bachelor’s, master’s and doctoral levels.
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What is a Doctor of Psychology (PsyD)?

A PsyD is a Doctor of Psychology. So, by definition, the focus is the (clinical) practice of psychology.  

The name for this type of training is the ‘practitioner scholar model’. Instead of conducting research, you apply it to treat and help your clients. As such, most PsyD programs are practical. They consist of fewer research or statistics classes and more clinical subject areas.    

These areas frame theories about growth and behavior. Plus, methods to assess, diagnose, counsel and intervene with individuals and groups. You are also likely to develop expertise in a clinical area. What this means is you focus on a specific group or issue. Like troubled teens, families and couples or mental health. You also complete hands on training in a setting related to your choice. 

While in your PsyD, there are tests to pass along the way that show you’ve fused skills and knowledge. And apart from clinical hours, you have to write a thesis. Also called a dissertation, it differs from the one you do in a PhD. A PsyD paper may be a long form essay or project. So while you still have to read and research, you do not have to come up with a new theory.

As for the clinical hours, there may be two parts. First a practicum, then an internship in your last 2 semesters.

PsyD vs PhD in Psychology

Degree comparisonsPhD in PsychologyPsyD (Doctor of Psychology)
Who is it ideal for?Designed for those interested in clinical practice, research and academia 
Designed for those interested in clinical practice with clients  
What does it focus on?Focus on research 
Focus on clinical (hands on) 
What are the admission criteria?Typical Admission criteria/requirements: Bachelors (major in psychology preferred) and or masters (preferred), strong research interests, acceptable GPA (3.0 – 3.5) and standardized test scores like the GRE, references, goals statement and writing sample. Often, there is an interview too. 
Typical Admission criteria/requirements: 
Bachelors (major in psychology preferred) and or masters (major in the same field), CV, acceptable GPA (3.0 – 3.5) and standardized test scores like the GRE, references, goals statement, and aptitude to help others.  
Often, there is an interview too. 
What can of funding can you get?Funding: Many PhD programs offer funding as students may serve as Research Assistants or Teaching Assistants
 
Funding: Fewer options from schools based on premise you earn your degree sooner and pursue a career
What are the program lengths?Program length: 5 – 8 years 
Program length: 4 – 6 years
  
What do courses and training look like?Courses: Research, statistics, analysis and theory (practical psychology knowledge) along with a research or teaching practicum and final dissertation 
Courses: Direct application of psychology through courses in topics that relate to intervention and treatment methods that relate to working with clients and patients plus a one year internship 
What are your career path options?Career path options: Scientific researcher, educator, consultant, program director, licensed psychologist Career path options: Licensed clinical, counseling or school psychologist (with many focal areas such as family and couple therapy)  

Which degree is perfect for you?

No matter which degree program you choose, PhD or PsyD, it may prep you to get your license. And, to pursue work in many of the same roles within clinical psychology.  

That said, do you want to research and teach psychology at the graduate level? Or do you see yourself in an office setting helping a patient reach their goals? 

A PhD in psychology explores the science of behavior. So, things like testing, theory and analysis are staples. As such, it may appeal to you if you want to impact the field. Either as a teacher, researcher, consultant or scholar.    

In contrast, a PsyD looks at ways to apply science in real time. In other words, you take a proven theory about behavior. Then, use it to help someone work through their issues.  

That said, a PsyD may appeal to you if you see yourself in a counselor role. Seeing a patient one to one or conducting group therapy sessions. You’d still need to keep up to date on the latest methods. But likely not be the one in the lab.   

Admission Requirements for PhD vs PsyD Programs

Admission standards for PhD vs PsyD programs differ by school and by program although the process may be the same. You fill out an application, submit material and have an interview. 

Each university sets its own criteria too. These tend to be about lowest level grade and test score ranges, but there may be others. Generally, both programs favor undergrads with a major in psychology. And many want you to have a masters. For the PsyD, they want this major in a related area. 

It is common for schools to set an approved GPA range of 3.0 and up. You may need to submit recent GRE scores and there may be a range for these too.  

Admissions teams also read your personal statement and reference letters. These should attest to your character and work ethic as well as answer the school’s questions about you. 

After these, there are a few that are distinct for each program. PhD programs assess more criteria. One, they want to see you have the ‘stick to it’ mentality to enable you to finish a rigorous PhD program.  

And, they look at whether your research interests align with theirs. This is to see if there’s a ‘fit’ as successful candidates work under faculty in their labs. 

PsyD programs don’t look at your research interests. They want to see you have the personality to work with problems of individuals and families.

What are your chances of ‘getting into’ a PhD or PsyD? There is some interesting data on that. According to the APA, they are both harder to get into than masters in psychology programs.  

And, at the doctorate level, the highest number of programs, applications, and acceptances were in clinical psychology. These had an overall acceptance rate of 12% compared to a range of 8 to 15% for other subfields. 

Funding for PhD vs PsyD Programs

Another contrast area between the PhD vs PsyD is the type of funding that may be available.  

Many PhD psychology programs offer stipends and waive tuition. In exchange, you work as a research or teaching assistant. As a result, you could help faculty advance their projects. And if the stipend is generous, you may get a full ride. 

PsyD students may be eligible for a stipend, if the school offers it. But not all do, and many schools do not waive tuition either. The premise is that you will graduate sooner from a PsyD than a PhD, and once you do, pursue a career.  

That said, if financial aid is still an issue, there may be ways to fund a dissertation or thesis. According to the APA, sources include schools, foundations, APA divisions and grants, psychology groups, state and federal agencies. 

You might also be able to bring the cost of a degree down with a scholarship or fellowship. These could pay part or all your studies and unlike a loan, you typically do not pay the money back. Keep in mind, you still need to abide by some terms. 

Program Length in a PhD vs PsyD Program

Both a PhD and PsyD entail a significant amount of time. Many PhD programs devote about three years to course work and lab rotations. Once you compete these components, there is an exam.  

Passing the exam allows you to move onto your own research project (dissertation). There may also be an option to take part in a teaching practicum, depending on the school.  

To complete all these steps, you might need an average of 5 to 7 years. At that, some schools are flexible, and give more time since the research process is extensive.  

In comparison, PsyD students may need from 4 to 6 years. The first three years tend to be for classes and exams. And the latter part, for practicum, internship and doctoral project. As the project is one of applied research, it may be less complex an effort than for the PhD.  

1

Southern New Hampshire University

  • Take advantage of some of the nation’s most affordable tuition rates, while earning a degree from a private, nonprofit, NEASC accredited university
  • Generous transfer policy, accepting up to 90 credits; the university also partners with community colleges for easy transfer.
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2

Purdue Global University

  • Competency-based ExcelTrack™ Programs may allow you to earn your degree faster and for less money
  • Experience world-class education online with more than 175 programs at associate’s, bachelor’s, master’s and doctoral levels.
Purdue Global University

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Courses for a PhD vs PsyD Program

While there are places of overlap, courses for a PhD and PsyD differ, as you might guess.  

A PsyD aims to provide academic, practicum, internship and research experience. While science based, it emphasizes therapy and counseling methods.  

This yields a study plan around quality clinical skills. Ones needed to assess, diagnose and treat mental health problems and illnesses. You tend to also study ethical codes and how to set boundaries with patients. So, some classes cover group dynamics, cultural diversity and other professional issues. 

In some PsyD programs, you can choose a focal area as well. Forensics, health, mental illness, family and couple are a few. Each one brings with it some electives, practicum and research. So aside from the core program, you are likely to develop expertise in one subject area.    

PsyD Sample Classes 

  • Interviewing assessment
  • Intelligence testing
  • Psychoanalytic theory
  • Human growth (child, adolescent, adult, older adult)
  • Consultation and supervision
  • Psychopharmacology
  • Human sexuality
  • Substance abuse
  • Clinical practicum
  • Statistics
  • Doctoral project courses 

Main goal: To learn how to provide psychological services.
Central elements: Core classes, exam, electives, doctoral project courses, internship.   
Credits: Varies, some programs cover 70 to 80 credits. 

PhD programs include core courses, seminars, reading and research. Core courses frame theories like social learning, behaviorist, cognitive, gender and more. You also tend to human growth, milestones and phases.    

Research methods are central too. Topics like statistics, experiment design, and data analysis. These take a good part of your study plan and may involve lab rotations.  

If you plan to teach, you might take classes that outline teaching skills. Things like how to communicate and manage a classroom. You tend to have a teaching practicum too. 

Most students also choose to earn a PhD in a specific area of psychology. It guides your dissertation work and includes electives in your chosen area. For example, let’s say you do a PhD in social psychology. It may discuss all the above and add topics related to memory, attention, schema theory and social influence. 

PhD in Psychology Sample Classes 

  • Psychology themes and theories
  • Human growth (child, adolescent, adult, older adult) 
  • Culture and psychology
  • Teaching of psychology
  • Consultation
  • Program assessment
  • Research foundations
  • Advanced qualitative reasoning
  • Research theory, design, methods
  • Advanced quantitative reasoning
  • Research or teaching practicum 

Main goal: To generate new knowledge through scientific inquiry.
Central elements: Core classes, doctoral writing, research classes, dissertation support classes, teaching or research practicum. 
Credits: Varies, some programs cover 60 to 70 credits. 

APA Accreditation  

Beyond the above, APA accredited programs follow guidelines. APA accreditation promotes unified standards both for training and education.  

The APA commission accredits PhD and PsyD programs in a few areas. Clinical psychology, counseling psychology, school psychology and ones related.  

APA standards also span a broad and general training in scientific psychology and core elements of practice. And aim to ready students for the practice of professional psychology. 

As a graduate of an APA accredited program, you may be prepared for licensure. For one, these programs cover material you need to master for the EPPP exam. The EPPP is the Examination for Professional Practice in Psychology. 

It is from the Association of State and Provincial Psychology Boards (ASPPB). You need to pass this to be a licensed psychologist. Second, some states mandate you have a degree from an APA accredited program. Or prove their program is equal. In other words, if your goal is licensure, APA accreditation matters.     

Potential Career Path Options for a PhD vs PsyD Program

To call yourself a licensed psychologist, you first need to take and pass the EPPP exam. Or, Examination for Professional Practice in Psychology. It is available through the Association of State and Provincial Psychology Boards (ASPPB). Each state may also mandate continued education to keep your license active.    

Some licensed psychologists go an extra step to board certify in a specialty area. This is through the American Board of Professional Psychology (ABPP). Either a PsyD or PhD may help ready you to take the EPPP exam. But each type of degree helps you hone certain skills that may be useful in different career paths. 

A PhD, for example, nurtures skills in analysis. So, it may be helpful for positions such as researcher, consultant, program director and or, educator. According to the O’NET, college psychology teachers earn median annual wages of $76,620. Demand is high too, with 11% more jobs forecast for 2028. So, this may be one option.    

If you prefer to solve problems in the workplace, I / O psychology is another in demand sector. Industrial organizational psychologists rely on data and earn a median annual salary of $92,880 per year. 

On the other hand, a PsyD expands practical clinical skills. And these are crucial if you want to work with clients in an office or health care setting.  

According to the BLS.gov, psychologists earn a median annual wage of $80,370. Many work in private practice. And others may find jobs in gov’t, hospitals, ambulatory care and schools. Prospects are even better if you work with seniors and rehab psychology. 

Other Doctoral Degrees in Psychology

There are a few other doctoral degrees that may be useful if you want to pursue a career in psychology. One is the EdS, or Education Specialist. And another is a DBA, or Doctor of Business Administration. Likely in organizational psychology.  

Education Specialist (EdS) 

An EdS is a post masters and pre doctoral degree. It generally takes about three years to complete after a masters degree. Most EdS programs are designed for professionals who would like to study beyond the master’s degree level. But do not plan to pursue a doctoral degree like the PhD or PsyD. 

The course work is at the advanced graduate level though. So many schools will transfer earned credits to a doctoral degree if you decide to pursue one later. 

Some students choose the EdS to improve their skills for advanced licensure in K – 12 related roles. Or to prep for academic and administrative leadership roles within higher education. 

In some states graduates can pursue licensure with an EdS. Although in other states you must have either a PhD or EdD (a doctoral level degree) to pursue licensure.  

Both school counseling and school psychology are practice areas in EdS programs. School psychology programs cover education and mental health subject areas. Like behavioral and learning disorders, performance plans and specific counseling tactics for students. 

If you want to prepare for a career as a school psychologist, this may be an option. According to the BLS, the demand for school psychologists is on the rise. Apart from 15% more jobs by 2028, average annual salaries are about $76,990. 

Doctor of Business Administration (DBA) 

A DBA in I / O psychology studies human behavior in the workplace. It typically takes about three years to complete after a masters or MBA. Many DBA programs are for senior executives who make decisions and policies for their business. For instance, human resource directors and training managers.

These roles tend to rely on research and data to solve problems. In a work setting, these problems often affect productivity, profit, morale and performance. Some of the subject areas in a DBA program are leadership and coaching. You may also learn how to manage conflict and group dynamics.   

As a doctorate in business admin, it is likely to focus on managerial theory too. So, tactics, planning and policy processes tend to be key topics also. Some I / O psychologists launch a career with a masters in I / O psychology. And if a career as a licensed psychologist is your goal, a PhD may be more useful. 

At present, the Society for Industrial Organizational Psychology (SIOP) does not list the DBA as a path to licensure. You would need either a PhD or PsyD from an accredited school. Then, undergo a supervised practice and pass the EPPP exam.

But if a C suite job lines up with your personality, a DBA may provide other possible paths. Consulting is one area where demand is high. Business consultants use psychological research methods as well as strategic managerial skills. They can help a company become more efficient and control costs.

According to the BLS, jobs for consultants are on the rise by 14% through 2028. Other job titles are management analyst and leadership development manager. Beyond faster than average growth, consultants earn an average annual salary of $83,610. And some earn more than $152,760.     

Colleges That Accept Low SAT Scores

Colleges That Accept Low SAT Scores

Truly, you wish you’d scored better on the SAT. But colleges that accept low SAT scores might help with your goals anyway. In fact, we’ve rounded up 7 partner schools that have no SAT score requirements. Also, we have compiled a list of 20 schools that accept SAT scores in the 25th percentile range. First though, we will run through some things to consider.

1. CAN YOU STILL GET INTO COLLEGE WITH A LOW SAT SCORE?

Even if you have low SAT scores, there is still a chance of getting into college.  For one, according to the NCES, 52.2% of all colleges have no application criteria. This means, they may not look at standardized test scores like the SAT at all.

Many colleges are now test optional too. Test optional colleges let you decide to submit test scores or not. Then there are test flexible colleges. A test flexible college may accept a wider list of scores than the SAT.  As a result, you have a bit of wiggle room if you got low SAT scores and want to play up other qualities. Your high school grades for example. References, personal essay or community service.

The International Baccalaureate or Advanced Placement (AP) exam scores are a few. Some may also accept the scores of the ACT Assessment Test or the SAT Reasoning Test. You must check. Bottom line – there may be many colleges that you can apply to. And, if you are unclear about a school’s admission policy, reach out to them. They may have options. 

As of 2018 the 51st percentile SAT score is 1060. That is to say 51% of test-takers score below 1060. But your percentile is not the only number you need to know.

2. WHAT IS CONSIDERED A LOW SAT SCORE?

To understand what a low SAT score you have to look at your scores in context. This is because how “low” your SAT score is will depend on which college you hope to attend. First though, it may be useful to understand the SAT and scoring.  The SAT has two sections. ERW (Evidence Based Reading and Writing) which tests your use of the English Language. And Math which tests your ability to problem solve.

When you take a test, you get two section scores – one for ERW, and one for Math. There is also an optional SAT essay. But these scores are separate. To calculate section scores, your raw score gets converted to a scaled score of 200 to 800. This means the lowest possible SAT score is 200 for ERW and 200 for Math.

You also get a total score (ERW + Math scores). Total scores range from 400 to 1600 with 400 being the lowest. And these scaled scores are the ones provided on SAT score reports. The national average, or mean SAT, looks at the scores of all high school graduates. It records these figures and shows trends from year to year.

According to the College Board, the national averages for the SAT were

  • Evidence Based Reading and Writing: 531
  • Math: 528
  • Total: 1059

As these are averages, some people score 1060 and higher, or above the norm. And others score anywhere from 1058 down which is below the norm. But if you get 25% of SAT questions right, you score above the lowest score.  There are also average scores for ethnic groups, family income level and gender. Each state and college also have their own averages.

There’s a general rule that If it falls around a given school’s 25th percentile, your score is low.

1

Southern New Hampshire University

  • Take advantage of some of the nation’s most affordable tuition rates, while earning a degree from a private, nonprofit, NEASC accredited university
  • Generous transfer policy, accepting up to 90 credits; the university also partners with community colleges for easy transfer.
Sanhu-university

visit school

2

Purdue Global University

  • Competency-based ExcelTrack™ Programs may allow you to earn your degree faster and for less money
  • Experience world-class education online with more than 175 programs at associate’s, bachelor’s, master’s and doctoral levels.
Purdue Global University

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3. MAKE SURE YOUR APPLICATION SHINES

Generally speaking your application is important! To be sure, whether you’re applying to college with a low SAT score. Or, taking the test optional route, the rest of your application may matter more than ever. Overall, you are going to want to have as strong an application as possible.

In fact, some test optional schools may ask for additional application materials. For example, an essay or letters of recommendation. In reality, it’s wise to maximize any opportunities during the admissions process. Because doing so will showcase your potential beyond test scores. By all means, make sure you have a strong application!

4. DON’T JUST LOOK FOR COLLEGES THAT TAKE LOW SAT SCORES

In other words, look for the college that feels like your ideal fit. After all, you don’t just want to get in, you want to do well. With this in mind, important factors may include:

  • First, is the school known for your prospective major?
  • Second, what organizations or activities are available?
  • Third, do you want to study on campus or online?

7 COLLEGES WITH NO SAT SCORE REQUIREMENTS

By and large, many students wonder, “What colleges can I get into with my SAT score?” In short, the good news is, there are plenty of schools that do not demand high SAT scores. Even better, there are some that do not ask you to submit them at all!

Keep in mind that colleges consider other factors besides the SAT. This makes it important to make sure the rest of your App measures up as well. Also, SAT and other admissions requirements are subject to change. In summary, check with the school.

Below we show you seven schools that no SAT requirements.

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PURDUE UNIVERSITY GLOBAL  

MINIMUM SAT SCORE: SAT NOT REQUIRED

Available Degree Programs

  • Accounting: Bachelor of Science (BS)
  • Cybersecurity: Bachelor of Science (BS)
  • Early Childhood Administration: Bachelor of Science (BS)
  • Psychology: Bachelor of Science (BS)
  • Nursing (BSN) RN-to-BSN
ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS
  • High school diploma, GED, or equivalent
  • Some programs may require an entrance examination

Part of the renowned Purdue University System, Purdue Global offers an online education designed for busy adults. For this reason, they’re home to online programs across many career-focused areas. This includes competency based ExcelTrack™ degree programs. These programs may help you earn your degree on a timeline that’s ideal for you.

Plus, Purdue Global offers a risk-free three-week trial period. That way you can see if their unique approach to higher education is your style.

2

STRAYER UNIVERSITY 

MINIMUM SAT SCORE: SAT NOT REQUIRED

Available BS Degree Programs

  • Accounting
  • Business Administration
  • IT
  • Criminal Justice
SCHOOL ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS
  • Official high school transcript
  • Completed application form and enrollment agreement
  • A valid, current, government issued photo ID

Strayer University’s online degrees are flexible, regionally accredited, and supported by people who know what it means to work while learning.  Plus, save up to 25% on your tuition, with the Strayer Graduation fund.

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University of Arizona Global Campus