The Psychology of Lying

Even the most honest person has probably lied at least once in her or his lifetime. Sometimes lying feels justified and harmless—we call them “little white lies.” Sometimes lying feels necessary in order to keep the peace between a spouse, friend, or family member.

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But as evident in any headline-making scandal, lies may be damaging and have been known to ruin marriages, friendships, and careers. Let’s examine the psychology behind lying: who lies, what we lie about, and why we lie.

Who Lies?

It’s not necessarily clear from research the prevalence of lying. Some studies show that we all lie, and we lie nearly every day. Others conclude that the majority of people are essentially honest—they don’t lie at all, or they don’t lie all that much.

Studying lying isn’t necessarily easy. Many such studies involve having people keep a diary of when they lie over a certain period of time. But there’s no way to tell whether people are being honest in their self-reporting—and people who lie might lie about whether they do and how often they do it.

However, some general trends have emerged about who lies.

What Do We Lie About?

People lie about all kinds of things, depending on who they are lying to. A common lie that both women and men use is “I’m fine.” But there are some differences between the lies men and women make.

Men have admitted to lying about their whereabouts (“I’m stuck in traffic” / “I’m on the way”), a partner’s appearance (“No, your butt doesn’t look big in that”), and gifts they’ve received (“It’s just what I’ve always wanted!”).

Women also lie about gifts they receive, but also about feeling ill (“I have a headache”) and about finances (“It wasn’t that expensive”). It seems that when a man or woman thinks that the truth will make their partner angry, they lie about what they find to be harmless.

 

Why We Lie

Psychologist Robert Feldman has spent many years studying lying. His research showed that when people felt their self-esteem was threatening, they began to lie at higher levels.

Feldman also found that women often have different motives for lying than men, observing:

“Women were more likely to lie to make the person they were talking to feel good, while men lied most often to make themselves look better.”

—Psychologist Robert Feldman

People lie in relationships for a number of reasons.

  • Fear of disappointing or angering their partner
  • To avoid conflict
  • To cover up bad behavior
  • They don’t want to hurt their partner’s feelings
  • For the thrill of it

Keep a lie journal for a week. Write down every lie you tell, who you told it to, and then, delve into the psychology of why you felt compelled to tell it. After that, if you’re hungry for more psychology knowledge, you can search for a psychology program that fits in with your life!

Sources

http://www.blifaloo.com/info/lying-why.php https://time.com/4805380/lying-telling-the-truth/ https://www.ambitionsaba.com/resources/how-often-do-people-lie https://www.uab.edu/news/research/item/12398-new-research-shows-most-people-are-honest-except-for-a-few https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/questions-character/202211/are-most-people-liars https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8982912/#:~:text=A%20meta%2Danalysis%20on%20honesty,4%25%20more%20deceptive%20than%20women. https://www.goldenstepsaba.com/resources/lying-statistics https://huckleberrycare.com/blog/age-by-age-guide-to-lying https://www.rochester.edu/newscenter/when-do-teens-lie-to-their-parents-and-when-do-they-tell-the-truth-574982/ https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/the-nature-of-deception/202303/psychopaths-and-pathological-lying http://smg.media.mit.edu/library/DePauloEtAl.LyingEveryday-Life.pdf http://smg.media.mit.edu/library/DePaulo.ManyFacesOfLies.pdf http://cbsnews.com/news/science-proves-it-men-lie-more-than-women/ http://condor.depaul.edu/tcole/lying.pdf

How to Earn Credit for College with Life Experience

I went to the school of hard knocks. Life is the best teacher. You may have heard these adages before, and there is some truth in them. Many of us do learn from life experiences. While the learning may not always be welcomed at first, we may look back and see how much we’ve grown. We might even be amazed at the knowledge we gleaned—even if the process was filled with potholes. What if you could use those life experiences and turn them into college credits via a “life experience” degree program?

With many nontraditional students returning to college—single moms, professionals seeking new career paths, full-time employees who want to finish their undergrad work—new challenges arise. Trying to juggle family life, work, and earning an online degree isn’t easy. However, if you could transform certain life experiences into legitimate, academic credits that would be accepted by quality, accredited colleges, you may find yourself inspired and motivated to earn that Bachelor’s or Master’s degree you have your heart set on.

College Credit

Credit for Prior Learning (CPL) and Prior Learning Assessment (PLA)

Life experience programs involve Credit for Prior Learning (CPL) and Prior Learning Assessment (PLA). These are educational concepts designed to recognize and give credit for the knowledge and skills that individuals have acquired outside of traditional academic settings. These mechanisms provide a means for learners to demonstrate their proficiency in specific subject areas and potentially earn college credits for their prior experiences.

Credit for Prior Learning (CPL) generally refers to the broader concept of recognizing various types of prior learning, including knowledge gained through work experience, military training, certifications, and self-directed study. It acknowledges that learning occurs in diverse settings and not solely within the traditional classroom environment.

Prior Learning Assessment (PLA) is a specific process within CPL that involves assessing and validating an individual’s prior learning to determine its equivalency to college-level learning. PLA methods may include examinations, portfolios, interviews, or demonstrations of skills. The goal is to evaluate and quantify the knowledge and competencies a person has acquired outside of formal academic courses.

Both CPL and PLA aim to support adult learners, non-traditional students, and those with significant life or work experiences in gaining academic recognition for their existing knowledge and skills. These approaches contribute to a more flexible and inclusive educational system by allowing individuals to accelerate their degree completion, reduce the time and cost of education, and align their academic journey with their real-world experiences.

Self-Assessment

What questions should you ask yourself to determine if earning college credit for life experience is right for you?

  • Is my knowledge up-to-date?
  • Is my learning similar to a certain class described in my college’s course catalog?
  • Does my learning correlate to the subject or major I will be studying at my university?
  • Do I understand the ideologies behind what I have done as well as the concrete steps I took to gain my life experience?

If you answered “yes” to the above questions, participating in a life experience degree program may be an option for you. Of course, only certain online colleges and universities offer these programs, so you should check with the college you are interested in to ensure they have such a program and that they will accept your life credits.

Ways to Turn Life Experience into College Credit

1. Standardized national exams You could earn college credit for your work experiences by taking a standardized national exam in an area that relates to the skills and knowledge you acquired through your work or other life experiences. Two such exams include:

Portfolio

Prepare a portfolio that documents your life experiences, achievements, and skills relevant to the courses or subjects you are seeking credit for. Include resumes, certificates, transcripts from non-academic training programs, and any other relevant documents.

Military experience Using military experience for college credit is a common practice, and many institutions have policies in place to recognize the skills and knowledge gained during military service.

Start by obtaining your military transcripts, such as the Joint Services Transcript (JST) for the Army, Navy, Marine Corps, and Coast Guard or the Community College of the Air Force (CCAF) transcript for the Air Force. These transcripts outline your military training and experience. Then check out the American Council on Education (ACE). This organization provides recommendations on how military training and experience may be equivalent to college-level credit.

Competency-based education (CBE)

Competency-Based Education (CBE) is an educational approach that focuses on learners’ mastery of specific skills and knowledge rather than traditional time-based structures. In CBE programs, students advance upon demonstrating their proficiency in the subject matter, allowing for a more flexible and personalized learning experience. They could skip units or sections of courses that cover what they already know. Look for colleges that offer CBE programs. Once you are in a program, you may be tested to assess your current knowledge.

Work experience through corporate training

Some institutions have procedures in place for evaluating and granting credit for corporate training. The American Council on Education Learning Evaluations helps colleges determine which college credits to offer in exchange for these types of programs. 

Conclusion

You may look around you at work and realize that you know more about your job than your co-workers with college degrees. If so, you should consider earning credits for your life experiences and check into college life experience programs that you might enroll in. It’s never too late to earn your degree. With so many flexible, online, college degree programs, you should have many options for finding a program for you that works for you! 

 

Making Networking Work for You

It’s not enough to simply send out your resume and hope for offers to come your way. In today’s job market, knowing someone could be the best way to get your foot in the door. The key is to connect with contacts who are relevant to your industry—and the type of career you’re pursuing. Luckily, there are plenty of solid strategies to help you cultivate a professional network and open up potential career opportunities.

When to Start Networking

The sooner you start networking, the better. In fact, a good time to take advantage of networking opportunities is while you’re still in school. That’s because you are likely surrounded by large pools of people who are interested in pursuing careers in related fields and by professors who could be invaluable sources for building new professional contacts.

In addition, if your school offers clubs or groups related to your industry of choice, joining one or more of them might be a great way to practice your business networking skills. Another option is to volunteer or intern at a company that’s relevant to your career goals—you could make connections with people in your industry who might eventually lead you to a job opportunity once you graduate.

How to network

The first step to networking successfully almost always begins with striking up conversations with strangers. There’s no getting around it. Often the hardest part is making that first contact—an easy way to do that is to jump in and introducing yourself. Then, it’s time to find common ground and learn more about the person by asking questions. You’d be surprised to find how much people enjoy talking about themselves if you give them the chance!

However, it’s not enough to just meet new people. You have to maintain relationships if you’re looking to build potential resources for future employment searches.

10 important networking tips

Now that you’re more familiar with how to network, it’s time to explore some strategies to become more effective at it. Some of these tips may seem obvious, but it’s easy to throw them by the wayside when you’re actually in conversation.

1. Be yourself

Many people can spot a phony, so be authentic. Show your true self rather than trying to put on a front to impress others. And don’t be afraid to add some humor into the conversation to lighten things up.

2. Be aware of your body language

It’s important that you appear open and confident in your body language. That means keeping your arms uncrossed, making direct eye contact, and, of course, giving off positive vibes with a genuine smile.

3. Be an active listener

Being a good listener entails really paying attention to what people are saying rather than just thinking about how you might respond. A good tip to try is to repeat the other person’s point in your own words. This shows that you are listening and that you understand what they are saying.

4. Never dismiss anyone as “unimportant”

A big mistake people often make is to write off others before getting to know them. You never know who could introduce you to your next boss—or be your next boss.

5. Connect the dots

A huge part of being a successful networker is to help other people connect, even if there’s nothing that is obviously in it for you. It’s important to be a giver and not a taker. In other words, leave your personal agenda at the door. If you go into conversations only thinking about what you might get from the other person, you’re doomed to fail.

6. Ask for introductions

One of the best ways to connect with important people is to be introduced by someone that they already trust—so don’t be afraid to ask. You have nothing to lose!

7. Follow up without being pushy

It’s always a good idea to follow up with a timely email—or even a chat on the phone. Just be wary of coming off as too desperate if you aren’t able to connect initially. Give the person time to respond on their own terms.

8. Stay connected

If you get a referral from one of your contacts, make sure to keep in touch about how the new connection is going. This could show your appreciation for the introduction typically help make it more likely that the referrals will continue.

9. Build a strong online presence

Tapping into online networking resources is pretty much a must in this digital age. Construct a professional and comprehensive LinkedIn profile with a compelling headline and a high-quality profile picture. Don’t just passively wait for others to see your profile—post industry-relevant content on your LinkedIn feed, engage with other’s content, participate in LinkedIn groups, and make sure to keep your profile up to date.

Consider engaging in other social media platforms as well. There are hundreds of them out there, and some are particularly relevant to specific industries. For example, platforms such as Instagram, Behance, Pinterest, or Tumblr could be particularly beneficial for those in the visual arts. Software developers might check out Stack Overflow or Find Nerd.

10. Be aware of your digital image

Review all your current social media profiles to ensure they don’t include anything inappropriate or offensive—some employers check social media sites as part of their screening process. Also, Google yourself frequently to see the kinds of results that are generated.

It’s understandable that putting yourself out there might feel intimidating. But building both your professional and social contacts could be a great way to expose yourself to people who could help further your career ambitions. Being comfortable and confident in your interactions with others is also a skill that could take you far in business, regardless of whether or not you’re looking for new job opportunities. So get yourself out there and remember to pay it forward!

 

Ready to go back to work? A 7-Step Plan for Stay at Home Moms

Stay at Home Moms

Making the decision to go back to work could be an exciting—and scary—prospect for stay at home moms. There may be many things to consider, such as your schedule, childcare options, and whether or not you have support systems in place to make things work. Your biggest hurdle might be a lack of confidence in your skills and abilities, but keep in mind that in your role as a mom you work hard every day – and are building skills that could be applied in the workforce!

Whether you’ve been a stay at home mom for one year or ten, there are actionable steps you could take now to increase your chances of successfully returning to your career. Follow our 7-step plan to help prepare you for your comeback in the career world!

7 Steps for Stay At Home Moms

1. Assess and update your skills

It’s time to get real and ask yourself some questions. What are your interests? Where are your strengths? What’s your relevant experience in your desired field? One great way to get yourself updated on the current job market could be to look at job descriptions in your areas of interest and pay attention to the desired qualifications. With the rapidly changing advancements and technologies across almost every industry, realistically, you’ll probably need to brush up on your skills. And that’s! It’s just a matter of figuring out an effective way to do that—whether it be taking a class, getting certified, or earning a degree.

You might also consult the Occupational Outlook Handbook from the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS). You’ll find job descriptions for hundreds of jobs, as well as typical salaries and job projections.

2. Spread the word

One way of increasing your chances of getting back to work might be to let people know you’re looking. That means updating your social media profiles and making everyone aware of your job search. If you’re not already on LinkedIn, it’s time to create a profile ASAP. Once you’re set up, ask friends and past co-workers or bosses to write recommendations for you, and—whenever possible—reach out and ask for introductions to people at companies you’re interested in. You could also join online professional groups to help build your contact list. And don’t discount more traditional forms of networking, such as reaching out to your contacts—including other stay at home moms—by phone or attending networking events. The important thing is to get out there, because you never know who you might meet!

3. Update your resume

It’s time for the task that strikes fear in the heart of many people—updating your resume. But it doesn’t have to be scary! Creating an effective resume could be critical if you want to sell yourself to potential employers. Start by figuring out how you might fill in your employment gap with relevant skills and experience you’ve acquired during your time as a stay at home mom.

A good way to do that may be to create a “functional resume” focusing on your skills and abilities, rather than simply your chronological work history. For example, were you a fundraising superstar for your child’s school? Did you serve as a member of the PTA or head of a Board? Or maybe you are involved in local politics or committees. These are activities that you could include on your resume under “relevant experience.” Just make sure you outline your responsibilities as they relate to your field. And to that point, it’s usually a good idea to customize your resume to the specific job you’re applying for, whenever possible.

4. Consider volunteering

It may seem counterintuitive to focus on volunteering when your main goal is getting back to work. However, putting in the effort to volunteer in your industry could be a great way to get your foot in the door, and it may pay off in the long run. That’s because volunteering could provide the opportunity to refresh your experience and gain new skills in your field. It shows that you are motivated and proactive,; and it could help you build relevant contacts who may serve as references, introduce you to potential job opportunities, or even decide to bring you on with the company. We know that you’re probably busy balancing your responsibilities at home with your job search, but if you could make the time, you’ve got nothing to lose.

5. Set realistic salary goals

Part of the planning process for going back to work involves figuring out what your desired salary range. This may be tough, especially if you’ve been out of the workforce for a long time. It could also be tempting to underestimate what you’re worth, so try not to fall into that trap. Consider your family’s budget—including childcare costs—and what you realistically need to earn to keep things afloat. To help give you an idea of what people in your desired occupations are earning you could consult the Bureau of Labor Statics (BLS) to find median salaries as well as even job projection data. Remember that you may have to take less money than you’d like to get the position you want, but that doesn’t mean you couldn’t earn more once you’ve built up your experience.

6. Practice interviewing

What’s one of the best ways to get good at interviewing? Practice, practice, practice! It’s time to enlist the help of your friends and family, to pose as potential employers in mock-up interviews. The more you rehearse, the more comfortable—and confident—you might be once it’s time for the real thing. To get you started, here are some sample questions to think about:

  • Why do you think you’re ready to go back to work now?
  • What’s a recent difficult problem you’ve faced, and how did you handle it?
  • Do you prefer to work alone or with others?
  • Can you describe your ideal boss?
  • What makes you a good fit for this position?
  • Where do you see yourself in five years?

One more thing to remember when you land an interview is to do your research beforehand. You should be very familiar with who the company is, what they do, and who they serve. And be ready with some questions of your own to show that you’re prepared and are taking the position seriously.

7. Work with a professional

Sometimes it just makes sense to go with an expert. Whether you need help re-working your resume and cover letter, or finding the right type of job for your skills and experience, there’s likely a professional out there who could help you out. You may be surprised to find how many people make a career out of helping others get their dream job. So, there’s no reason to feel hesitant about hiring a career coach or resume writer. Just make sure you do your research, so you get someone who’s been well- vetted by others.

Another avenue to consider is working with a recruiter, whose job it is to place the people with a company that could be a good fit. What you’ll likely need to do is meet with the recruiter (with your updated resume!) and go over your skills, experience, and goals so that they could keep you in mind when relevant positions come up.

Conclusion

Going back to work could be a major life change, and you should be proud that you’re taking that leap. In addition to following the seven steps we outlined above, you could help make the transition more seamless by focusing on how you might enhance your skills and qualifications to attract potential employers. One great way to boost your credentials could be to further your education by pursuing a degree. And when you study online, you’ll typically have the flexibility to do it on your own time—and from the comfort of your home.

 

Santa Claus Is Coming to Town…

‘Tis the season to be jolly, and what better way to kick off the festivities than by delving into the mystery behind the man with the magical belly that shakes like a bowl full of jelly? So buckle up, because we’re about to dive deep into the holly-jolly world of Santa Claus—the guy who somehow manages to visit every house in the world in one night.

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10 Fun Facts About Santa Claus

  1. He’s based on a Greek bishop named St. Nicholas, who lived in what is now Turkey in the third century A.D.
  2. He delivers gifts to children at a rate of about 22 million children per hour.
  3. You can “track” his Christmas Eve journey using Google’s Santa Tracker or NORAD (North American Aerospace Defense Command).
  4. He was awarded a pilot’s license by the Assistant Secretary of Commerce in 1927.
  5. There is a Santa University in Colorado where people study how to be Santa.
  6. A U.S. town is named after him: Santa Claus, Indiana.
  7. The average age that children in the U.S. stop believing in him is about 8–81/2.
  8. In a popular song in Australia, his sleigh is pulled by six big kangaroos—”boomers” (you can listen to the song here).
  9. He gets the most letters from France.
  10. In some countries children leave Santa Claus alcohol such as sherry and beer.

The History of Santa Claus

The figure of Santa Claus has a rich and diverse history that has evolved over centuries, blending various cultural influences. The modern portrayal of Santa Claus is often traced back to the legendary figure of Saint Nicholas, a Christian bishop who lived in the 4th century in Myra, which is present-day Turkey. Saint Nicholas was known for his piety, acts of kindness, generosity, and gift-giving.

So how did a bishop in Turkey morph into a jolly old man with a penchant for red velvet suits and a long, white bear? It is widely believed that the Dutch settlers brought the tradition of Saint Nicholas, or “Sinterklaas” in Dutch, to America, where his name was translated to Santa Claus. However, there were numerous changes from Santa’s arrival in the New World in the 1600s to Santa as we know him today.

Author Washington Irving was a major force in popularizing Santa Claus in America. In 1809, he wrote a book, The History of New York, where he reinvented Saint Nicholas from a tall, somber saint to a short, stout, merry, pipe-smoking Dutchman, dressed in traditional colonial attire.

The transformation of Santa Claus gained momentum in the 19th century in the United States. Clement Thomas Moore’s poem “Account of a Visit from St. Nicholas” (commonly known as “The Night Before Christmas”), published in 1823, further elaborated on the character of Santa Claus—his poem describes Santa driving a sleigh pulled by reindeer, landing on rooftops and carrying his sack down the chimney.

The popularization of this imagery was further enhanced by advertising. For example, in Coca-Cola Company’s advertising campaigns in the 1930s, the company’s artist, Haddon Sundblom, created illustrations of Santa Claus enjoying Coca-Cola, helping to shape the modern and universally recognized image of Santa.

 

Nice Guy or Disciplinarian?

If Santa started out as a humble, self-sacrificng, bishop, how did he wind up being the keeper of the naughty list, doling out punishments to children who aren’t up to snuff?

While we can’t be sure, there are a number of cultural influences that may be responsible.

Krampus

In the shadowy corners of Alpine folklore, there lurks a character who embodies the darker, more mischievous side of Christmas cheer. Meet Krampus, jolly old St. Nick’s evil sidekick.

The tale of Krampus dates back centuries, rooted in the Alpine regions of Europe, particularly in countries like Austria, Germany, and Hungary. He is often depicted as a horned, anthropomorphic creature with hooves, a long, pointed tongue, and sharp fangs. He is typically covered in fur and carries chains, bells, and a bundle of birch branches or a whip, which are used to swat naughty children. These days, Krampus has gone from being a feared creature to a cultural icon. In Alpine villages, folks dress up as Krampus for parades that are a delightful mix of spookiness and holiday cheer.

La Befana

La Befana is a legendary figure in Italian folklore, often referred to as the Italian Christmas Witch. The character of La Befana is associated with the celebration of Epiphany, which takes place on January 6th. Unlike the traditional image of Santa Claus, La Befana is depicted as an old woman with a hunchback, dressed in tattered clothing, and flying on a broomstick.

The folklore surrounding La Befana varies across different regions of Italy, but the most common story goes like this:

On their way to visit the baby Jesus, the Three Wise Men stopped to invite La Befana to join them. But she turned them down, claiming she had too much housework! Later, she had a change of heart and decided to find the baby Jesus, but it was too late. Now, every year, she goes house to house, leaving gifts for good kiddos and a bit of coal or dark candy for the troublemakers.

Père Noël and Le Père Fouettard

As with the Krampus tradition, in France Santa Claus has an evil counterpart, Le Père Fouettard.

Père Noël, the French counterpart to the universally recognized Santa Claus, emerges as the epitome of gift-giving elegance, traveling the world to bestow gifts on children who have been good. Conversely, Le Père Fouettard, translating to “Father Whipper” in English, deals with the naughty children. Originally depicted as a sinister butcher with a penchant for kidnapping children, Le Père Fouettard underwent a transformation when Père Noël intervened, repurposing his character as a disciplinarian rather than a malevolent figure. In this reimagined role, Le Père Fouettard administers symbolic whippings or dispenses lumps of coal to children found lacking in virtuous conduct.

Odin, the Norse God

It might seem odd—even blasphemous!—to associate a god with Santa Claus. But there are a number of similarities between Odin and St. Nicholas.

One notable parallel lies in the imagery associated with Odin during the Norse celebration of Yule. Odin, often referred to as the All-Father, was believed to have embarked on a mythical journey during the winter solstice, riding his eight-legged horse. This imagery of a wise, bearded figure on a magical journey shares similarities with the modern image of Santa Claus flying on his reindeer-led sleigh.

Additionally, Odin was associated with the act of gift-giving during the Yule season. The Norse tradition involved Odin delivering gifts to those who had been virtuous and punishments to those who had behaved poorly. The adoption of certain aspects of Odin’s mythology into the evolving folklore of Christmas likely occurred as a result of cultural exchanges and the assimilation of various traditions over time.

Other Santas Around the Globe

As the holiday season swings into gear, Santa’s getting ready for the ultimate worldwide sleigh ride. But guess what? Santa isn’t just a one-size-fits-all kinda guy. He’s got a passport, a bag full of cultural flair, and a whole bunch of alter egos, depending on where you are in the world.

We’ve already discussed traditions in which Santas has an evil twist. Here are some other unusual versions of the Yuletide’s Man of the Hour.

Tomte

Tomte isn’t your typical Santa Claus—he’s more like the cozy guardian of Christmas cheer. Picture a gnome-like figure with a long white beard, often dressed in traditional Swedish attire, and you’ve got the essence of Tomte. This mischievous but benevolent character is deeply rooted in Swedish folklore, and his presence is felt in homes across the country during the holiday season.

Joulupukki or Yule goat

Meet Joulupukki, the Finnish embodiment of Santa Claus. Unlike his globally recognized red-suited counterpart, Joulupukki sports a robe, often adorned in shades of blue or green. The name itself translates to “Yule Goat,” hinting at the magical partnership that defines the Finnish Christmas spirit.

In times past, Joulupukki wasn’t just a gift-giver; he had a mischievous edge. Children had to earn their presents by singing songs or reciting poems—a festive twist that adds an extra layer of charm to the Finnish holiday tradition. Enter the Yule Goat, a magical creature with roots in ancient pagan celebrations. In Nordic folklore, the Yule Goat was believed to roam from house to house, ensuring the holiday spirit was alive and well. Its origins trace back to times when people would dress as goat-like figures during winter festivities, bridging the gap between old and new traditions.

Tió de Nadal

As one of the most bizarre “Santas” on our holiday lineup, Tió de Nadal emerges as a wooden log sporting a cheerful smiley face that, believe it or not, engages in the unique act of “present defecation.”

Hailing from the Catalonian region of Spain, this endearing log finds its place beneath the Christmas tree, where children lovingly “feed” it a diet of nuts and dried fruit in the days leading up to Christmas. All the while, they ensure Tió de Nadal stays cozy under a snug blanket, treating it like an honorary member of the festive household.

When Christmas Eve arrives, children playfully wield sticks, giving poor Tió a friendly beating, all while chanting a spirited song that doesn’t shy away from mentioning bodily functions. The morning after, the little ones are in for a joyful surprise—Tió de Nadal has left behind a pile of gifts and sweets.

Conclusion

Congratulations, you are now most likely an very knowledgeable on Santa Claus! You’re sure to be a big hit at the next Christmas office party, as you regale your coworkers with all that you’ve learned about the big guy. You also probably have a greater cultural awareness about the hero of the Christmas season. And that’s a gift even Santa would approve of.

The Sexiest Careers for Men and Women

In 2016, the dating app Tinder published a list of the “sexiest careers” for both men and women. A second list was released in 2018. Their methodology was based on swipes—which careers were right-swiped (chosen) the most by men and women.

Since then, other reports have come out about the careers men and women find most desirable in the opposite sex. These were typically based on actual surveys.

We looked at Tinder’s two lists and three fairly current surveys to determine which careers were deemed sexiest across all of the lists. And…drum roll…here are the results!

Careers Men Find Most Desirable in Women

There were two careers that appeared in all five lists. The first may not surprise you, based on common stereotypes. Regarding the second—it’s nice to see teachers being appreciated!

  • Nurse
  • Teacher (middle school was specified on two lists)

A number of careers appeared on three lists. Several more stereotypes with the flight attendant and secretary. But some men DO appreciate brains as well!

  • Flight Attendant
  • Waitress
  • Bartender
  • Lawyer
  • Secretary
Tinder's Sexiest Careers Infographic

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Careers Women Find Most Desirable in Men

Three careers appeared on all five lists. Firefighter? What woman doesn’t dream of firefighters! They bravely risk their lives and are usually in good shape to boot. Sexy calendars have been made of them, after all. The other two professions are prestigious and powerful. (And, to be realistic, salary might also be a driving factor for these choices.)

  • Firefighter
  • Lawyer
  • Doctor (4 doctors and one Physician Assistant)

Two careers appeared on four of the lists, and they are as different as can be. Interestingly, I found one list that included the least desired jobs, and Police Officer was on it. Go figure…

  • Police Officer
  • Founder/Entrepreneur (one list specified CEO, but CEOs could also be founders and entrepreneurs)

And the following careers appeared on three of the lists. Once again, quite a range.

  • Pilot
  • Engineer
  • Builder/Construction   
  • Paramedic

Additional Observations

Do men and women want the same thing?

For the most part, women and men wanted different things in their partner. The only career that appeared on three or more lists for both men and women was Lawyer. (Perhaps all those bad lawyer jokes are misguided!) Teacher appeared on two of the lists for men and five of the lists for women. Beyond those two careers, however, there is no significant overlap.

What types of careers were women attracted to?

The careers they chose seem to be split between brawn and brains. Women also tend to like men in powerful careers, or careers which involve taking charge. Money could be a driving factor for some of the careers they chose—the median annual salary for the top nine careers women chose was about $97,000.

What types of careers were men attracted to?

Big salaries don’t seem to matter as much to men. While the median annual salary of the top 9 careers that women chose is about $97,000, for men’s choices it is about $68,000. Beyond that, men seem to be attracted to careers that involve taking care of and nurturing others. Powerful women in general might be a turnoff for them—only one occupation, Lawyer, is typically held by powerful women.

Some interesting or unexpected careers that women chose:

There were a number of unusual careers that popped up on women’s lists. For example, one list included Faith Leader and Father! ( “Father” isn’t actually a career, but it’s a sweet thought.) Two lists included Electrician, and another, Farmer.

Some interesting or unexpected careers that men chose:

Men tended to be a little more traditional in their preferences. However, I was somewhat surprised at two of the careers they chose—Dentist and IT Worker. I mean, who likes dentists? And IT Worker might conjure up a picture of a nerdy woman wearing glasses.

Career Information

Now that you have an idea of what career you should pursue to be considered sexy by the opposite sex, here is some information about them, including average salaries and education requirements. (Salary figures are from 2022.)

Lawyer


Median Annual Salary: $135,7401

Typical Education Requirements: Undergrad degree + three years of law school

Registered Nurse


Median Annual Salary: $81,220

Typical Education Requirements: Bachelor’s degree, associate degree, or a diploma from an approved nursing program

Middle School Teacher


Median Annual Salary: $61,810

Typical Education Requirements: Bachelor’s degree

Firefighter


Median Annual Salary: $51,680

Typical Education Requirements: HS diploma and training in emergency medical services

Doctor


Median Annual Salary: $229,300

Typical Education Requirements: Bachelor’s degree + degree from medical school

Physician Assistant


Median Annual Salary: $126,010

Typical Education Requirements: Bachelor’s degree + experience in patient care

Police Officer/Detective


Median Annual Salary: $69,160

Typical Education Requirements: HS diploma, bachelor’s degree, graduation from training academy

Top Executive


Median Annual Salary: $100,090

Typical Education Requirements: Bachelor’s degree and experience

 

Sources

1https://www.bls.gov/ooh/legal/lawyers.htm#tab-12https://www.bls.gov/ooh/legal/lawyers.htm#tab-43https://www.bls.gov/ooh/healthcare/registered-nurses.htm#tab-14https://www.bls.gov/ooh/healthcare/registered-nurses.htm#tab-45https://www.bls.gov/ooh/education-training-and-library/middle-school-teachers.htm#tab-16https://www.bls.gov/ooh/education-training-and-library/middle-school-teachers.htm#tab-47https://www.bls.gov/ooh/transportation-and-material-moving/flight-attendants.htm#tab-18https://www.bls.gov/ooh/transportation-and-material-moving/flight-attendants.htm#tab-49https://www.bls.gov/ooh/protective-service/firefighters.htm#tab-110https://www.bls.gov/ooh/protective-service/firefighters.htm#tab-411https://www.bls.gov/ooh/healthcare/physicians-and-surgeons.htm#tab-112https://www.bls.gov/ooh/healthcare/physicians-and-surgeons.htm#tab-413https://www.bls.gov/ooh/healthcare/physician-assistants.htm#tab-114https://www.bls.gov/ooh/healthcare/physician-assistants.htm#tab-415https://www.bls.gov/ooh/protective-service/police-and-detectives.htm#tab-116https://www.bls.gov/ooh/protective-service/police-and-detectives.htm#tab-417https://www.bls.gov/ooh/management/top-executives.htm#tab-118https://www.bls.gov/ooh/management/top-executives.htm#tab-4

From Service to Student: An Infographic Overview of Military Students

Did you know that nearly half of the veterans who served September 2001 or later have a college degree? Earning a degree could be a great way for military members to embark on a new career path or build on existing skills and knowledge. This could be particularly important for those who are transitioning between military and civilian life. In some cases, military experience may even be accepted as college credit at certain military-friendly institutions. As such, it’s always a good idea to check with the admissions department at your chosen college to confirm whether or not they accept military experience as credit.

Demographics of Military Students

Infographic Overview of Military Students

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Veteran Education Benefits

You may be surprised to learn that 53% of active duty military are married and/or raising children.1 When you combine this fact with ever-increasing tuition costs, it makes sense that military students may need to look to certain benefit programs to help them fund their education, if they qualify. The good news is that there may be a variety of education benefit programs for qualifying veterans and their families. Examples of these programs include the Veteran’s Educational Assistance Program (VEAP), Survivors’ and Dependents’ Educational Assistance (DEA) program, and the Servicemen’s Readjustment Act (GI Bill). To find out more about veteran benefits, visit Veterans Benefits Administration.

Other Ways to Fund Your Education

In addition to veteran benefit programs, military service members could also look into scholarships that may be available to qualified students. There are many military scholarships available. Some are specific to a particular military branch, such as the NMCRS Education Assistance Program, the Henry J. Reilly Memorial Scholarship Program, and the AFAS Military Education Benefits Program. Others are offered by foundations, such as Imagine America. And you’ll also find scholarships available for military dependents, such as the My Career Advancement Account (MyCAA) Scholarship.

While scholarships alone may not be enough to cover your tuition costs, if they are available and you qualify, they could definitely help ease some of the burden. Click here for more information on military and veteran scholarships.

Another area to look into is military education benefits offered by the different branches of the military. To find out whether or not you qualify for military education benefits, visit the official website of your respective military branch.

 

Sources

[i]dol.gov/wb/stats/nontraditional_occupations.htm | [ii]thrillist.com/travel/nation/the-15-weirdest-jobs-in-the-world | [iii]neweurope.eu/article/top-ten-weirdest-jobs-world | list25.com/25-of-the-weirdest-jobs-on-earth | lolwot.com/20-of-the-most-bizarre-jobs-people-have-around-the-world | [iv]scoopwhoop.com/inothernews/weird-jobs-of-the-world | [v]thefiscaltimes.com/Articles/2011/08/25/10-Dirty-Jobs-That-Nobody-Wants | [vi]extracrispy.com/culture/136/now-hiring-extra-crispy-is-looking-for-a-bacon-critic | [vii]jobs.net/article/cb-196-talent-network-restaurant-9-unusually-weird-jobs-in-the-food-industry | [viii]roberthalf.com/accountemps/job-seekers/career-center/career-advice-and-job-search-tips/beyond-the-traditional-5-unusual-types-of-accounting-jobs | [ix]healthline.com/health-news/weird-jobs-in-the-medical-field-you-never-thought-about-123015#2 | [x]brazen.com/blog/archive/job-search/beyond-the-blackboard-8-unusual-and-in-demand-teaching-careers | [xi]verywell.com/cool-psychology-jobs-2794938 | [xii]careerprofiles.com/blog/hiring-innovative-talent/6-crazy-new-titles-for-marketers-and-what-they-mean | [xiii]livescience.com/37284-weirdest-science-jobs.html | [xiv]complex.com/pop-culture/2014/06/15-weird-tech-jobs-you-never-knew-existed-but-wish-you-had

What is the Singularity …is it a Danger?

The Singularity could refer to various future scenarios. What is the Singularity when it comes to AI? The technology Singularity refers to a time when AI may advance beyond human intelligence.

Contrary to many media claims, the Singularity isn’t happening right now. In fact, it’s unlikely to for decades and may never occur. We may better understand the implications of a potential Singularity by clarifying AI definitions.

These varieties of AI may help you understand what the Singularity could mean more clearly. Here we’ll discuss the current debate about the possibility and impossibility of the Singularity to highlight distinctions in AI variations.
We’ll also provide benefits and drawbacks for AI. Gaining a better grasp of how AI works could help you understand The Singularity and why it may or may not matter to you.

Singularity Definition

The Singularity is a hypothetical idea about a potential future. It’s not inevitable. In fact, scientists, experts, and engineers debate if it’s even possible. For AI Singularity to happen, artificial intelligence must advance beyond that of humans.

That’s key to the Singularity definition – intelligence that surpasses human cognition. This idea makes headlines. But it’s not necessarily worthy of them. In fact, the notion may sometimes create more disinformation than news.

Jared Holt, from the think tank Institute for Strategic Dialogue, speaks to this. He says companies like Microsoft and Google inflate the potential of their products. That this ignores embedded limits and flaws within their AI propagates disinformation.

Fact is, the Singularity likely doesn’t pose a danger to us. But media misinformation, like what Holt points to, might. Let’s explore facts and definitions for a better understanding of AI and its potential impact.

What is the Singularity | AI Pros and Cons

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What is intelligence?

The notion of AI as “smart” raises the question – what is intelligence? If we’re to believe the hype of AI creators and proponents, data regurgitation qualifies as intellect. That’s because AI language models and data processors copy data patterns and mimic human communication to deliver data results to users.

This may be a form of knowing… but could knowledge at this level equal or surpass human intelligence? One way to test this might be to ask if AI can apply its learned information in a meaningful way.

The definitions of knowledge and intelligence show this difference between them. Intelligence is about the application of learning rather than just its access and delivery. Applied learning works with information, it may make improvements or adjustments.

For instance, AI can access and deliver the data for how to build a bird feeder. But can it suggest how to make a better bird feeder than one that currently exists? The intelligence it takes to do this kind of work involves understanding the experience of owning or using a bird feeder.

AI can’t have a human (or bird) experience. Humans have ideas about things that haven’t been thought about yet – a better bird feeder than this one. AI can create new content from old content. But can it have new ideas?

AI is a machine that converts data inputs into organized outputs. These outputs seem meaningful and relevant to our human brains. But the AI makes data connections thanks to software programming. It isn’t making meaning as a human brain does.

Our minds have complex neural processing linked to our human experience. It’s a level of awareness beyond the AI realm of possibility. We’re impressed with AI results because our complex minds can interpret AI outputs as meaningful. But it’s our interpretation that makes this meaning, not the AI.
This isn’t to say that human experience and consciousness equals intelligence. But experience and awareness inform our intelligence by creating meaning out of data. This process, crucial to intellect, isn’t possible for AI.

AI can infer probabilities and find correlations. While impressive, these processes aren’t interpretations or awareness.

 

What is AGI

AGI stands for artificial general intelligence. It’s defined as AI that reaches the level of human intelligence. Although many creators and marketers for AI products claim their work can elevate AI to this point, it’s debatable.

This type of AI contrasts with ANI, artificial narrow intelligence. ANI has a detailed, designated purpose. Specificity of design and execution make ANI achievable and even impressive. Generative AI, such as ChatGPT, serves as an example.

But contrast, artificial general intelligence remains unspecified by definition. Experts, philosophers, and researchers point out gaps between AI’s promises and accomplishments. It’s in this void that we see the consequences of that vagueness.

Is artificial general intelligence possible ?

You’ll find varying answers to this question depending on who you ask. AI creators, such as Google’s DeepMind CEO, will say yes. While most AI scholars and experts, without dollars at stake, point to its impossibility.

Even the OpenAI blog from the creators of Chat GPT, speaks of AGI in terms of “if” it is possible. These proponents of AGI’s potential tend to speak of human level intelligence in terms of work productivity.

That’s because AI systems may be programmed to outperform human workers at certain tasks. For instance, computers can work faster at calculations and data summaries than humans. This doesn’t necessarily give AI greater intellectual capability than humans, though that may often be the claim.

For instance, an AI can output list of historical dates to perform faster than a human on a multiple-choice test on historic dates. But can an AI construct a better essay regarding the significance of those dates with insight into their relevance today?

Is artificial general intelligence possible? Not at our current technological state. But we don’t know what innovations may come. So, AGI doesn’t exist, but the possibility for it in the future does.

Why isn’t generative AI the same as AGI ?

Generative AI is a form of ANI. Artificial narrow intelligence (ANI) performs a particular function within a narrow framework and specific skillset.

In the case of generative AI, that framework is a dataset, such as a designated section of the internet. Generative AI creates content within that domain and through a specific language model.

AGI stands for artificial general intelligence. It’s non-specific and aspires to achieve any task a human can perform. Generative AI isn’t quite as ambitious as AGI… and that may be the smartest thing about it.

What is ASI ?

Imagine a computer programmed with super intelligence surpassing that of humans. What is ASI? It proposes the reality of this awe-inspiring concept. If ASI existed, it would function beyond human capabilities. However, many researchers, scientists, and experts argue that ASI may only ever be just an idea.

Others, especially computer scientists and AI creators, claim ASI could materialize anytime from 2065 to 100 years from now. This presupposes technology that doesn’t yet exist and requires massive speculation. But we get it, the resulting thought experiments might be fun.

Is superintelligence possible ?

ASI isn’t yet possible. However, we don’t know if it might become possible someday. Much like artificial general intelligence, artificial super intelligence is currently only an intriguing idea. It’s a powerful concept, creating more media buzz than most ideas merit.

Still, humans continue to ask, is superintelligence possible? Reasons for these queries span the gamut, from Hollywood movies to workplace disruptions and human mortality.

  • • Potential for the Singularity tends to raise emotions from excitement to fear of death.
  • • It can often be a fun thought experiment.
  • • Some share concerns that AI may replace their jobs or even careers.

Maybe someday ASI could become possible. That’s all it takes to inspire wild musings across the globe. From science fiction stories to morning shows, humans can’t get enough of the idea that computers will one day outdo us.

Media outlets also seem remind us on a regular basis that AI can help do tasks we’d rather not. From navigating us home to summarizing massive amounts of data, AI has perks.

What are the Benefits of AI ?

There are several potential benefits of AI. Employers are investing millions into artificial intelligence tools and apps in efforts to boost their bottom line. That’s why many researchers and media outlets focus their AI interest on its potential impact on business, work, and the overall economy.

For instance, McKinsey claims to have found 63 generative AI use cases spanning 16 business functions that may deliver a total value in the range of $2.6 trillion to $4.4 trillion in global economic benefits per year.

Let’s break out potential benefits to see how AI could impact workplaces.

  • • Increased efficiencies for AI implemented tasks. An example might be searching for, filtering, and summarizing libraries of relevant information for researchers.
  • • Faster customer service capabilities. For instance, chatbots and self-checkouts reduce time for customers who may otherwise await assistance.
  • • Fewer opportunities for human error. Although AI can’t provide a human touch, it also doesn’t get tired or need regenerative personal time.

These examples of potential AI perks are grounded in former user experiences and results. There may be many more possible benefits to come that we haven’t even imagined yet.

What are the Dangers of AI?

AI has also presented us with drawbacks based on user patterns and results. These may sometimes have a negative economic and/or social impact. So, it could be useful to weigh them against the potential benefits.

  • • Increased unemployment due to workforce replacements by AI. Many content creators may find their work can be done more cheaply by generative AI.
  • • Discriminatory filters embedded into AI applications may impact user perspectives and subsequent behavior.
  • • Outdated or corrupted data may lead to the spread of misinformation. This could have a negative impact on society if not regulated or at least vetted.

Conclusion

What is the Singularity but a mere idea compared to the far reaching benefits and drawbacks of AI at work today. It’s the difference between potential and reality. It’s intriguing and may even be fun to ponder the Singularity definition.

But the Singularity doesn’t present a danger currently. Instead, we can more deeply invest in the potential benefits of AI and respect its limitations. Interested in studying these possibilities? Click our links below to check out artificial intelligence degrees and programs.

Artificial Intelligence Degree Program 2023

What is an AI to Help Me Apply to Grad School?

How to use AI Research for Writing a Paper 

How to use AI Research for Writing a Paper

AI research could work for you as an ethical and efficient tool to help construct a paper. From ideation to creating a hypothesis, AI could kick off your research. Then artificial intelligence could also guide your construction of an outline and your structural content.

Let’s explore how to use AI research at each phase of writing your next paper. We created this step-by-step guide to help you. It includes relevant AI research and writing resources. This article could also help streamline your writing process without raising plagiarism concerns.

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How to use AI apps for research

As your paper’s due date encroaches, you might find yourself facing a blank doc on your computer screen. We understand. Sometimes it’s tough to get started or you may also feel stuck at points along the path. Here’s an outline of the creation phases with AI research apps to stimulate and streamline your writing process from start to finish.

Ideation This phase involves brainstorming, investigating, and blue sky thinking. Reach for the stars and don’t worry about the solidity of your ideas yet. Stay open minded and write it all down. Sometimes a seemingly crazy idea could inspire greatness.

AI apps for ideation: Ayoa, Itonics, Coggle
Features/Tools: mind maps, whiteboards, collaboration games, idea targeting, flow charts

Hypothesis Establishing a hypothesis lays the foundation for your research paper. It’s the core element of your idea. Some find a hypothesis by analyzing data. Others make an educated guess. Then they check the data for supportive material and conclusions. Sometimes research disproves the hypothesis, which could also make for a great paper.

AI apps for hypothesizing: Hyperwrite, Study Corgi, Jenni.ai
Features/Tools: topic simplifier, thesis tester, research library creator, translator

Outlining Preparing an outline establishes a logical flow of ideas and punctuates the major points of your paper for clarity. With this goal in mind, you may want to check the order of concepts in your outline and summarize each one a bit. This could help your stick to the point and ultimately make your paper easier for the reader to understand.

AI apps for outlines: Hypotenuse, Taskade, Copy.ai
Features/Tools: keyword generator, custom tone, bullets, headlines

Structured Content Building the body of your draft involves reflection on each outlined section and summary. This is where you bring in the details and nuance that truly make the paper your personal take on the research. It’s the phase where your writing lays out the facts and develops your insights.

AI apps for structure: Scite, Trinka, Elicit, Scholarcy
Features/Tools: reference checks, academic writing language correction, data summary

These tools might seem too good to be true. But they can’t write the paper for you. However, using them in a thoughtful way could mean cutting down your research and writing workload.

AI is engineered to increase efficiencies and these apps are typically designed to suit your research needs. Eager to check them out but harboring worries about ethics? Let’s address this concern.

 

Is using AI plagiarism?

AI on its own can’t constitute plagiarism. Just like a book can’t plagiarize itself, AI plagiarism requires unethical human usage. You can could avoid using AI research apps in an unethical way with a few simple steps. Follow these guidelines to keep your AI research and writing ethical without losing efficiencies.

Create Structure
Generative AI results usually deliver content in organized bullets and paragraphs. This order of information can could help stimulate and inspire your structure. You can could match the system of organization without plagiarizing the content. Simply use your own words and corresponding ideas.

Rewrite
The body of your paper could be well informed by AI research without plagiarism. It’s a matter of digesting AI summaries and constructing new phrasing to express the ideas that could fit your premise.

This means more than rewording or simply paraphrasing. Your research paper has its own premise with writing that backs it up with clear logic. So, that means using ideas that could fit your chosen story.

Cite Sources
Research involves facts and data. To cite them, you’ll need to show sources. This can could be done by either using AI that cites sources or looking up the data and facts to find sources yourself.
It’s standard practice in research and paper writing to provide a valid resource. That means the government, a university, or an esteemed institution makes for a preferred source.

How AI could help you outline and construct a paper

AI research could help you in many ways. But it’s especially good for summarizing large amounts of data into bite-size chunks. That’s how AI could help when conducting research and writing about your results.

Some AI research apps have better sourcing and are typically more reliable than others. Artificial intelligence also usually offers specific efficiencies. So, it may be helpful to pay attention to the specific tools of each. That way you’ve got the perfect app for the job at hand.

Let’s look at this in action with generative AI and outlining. We’ll break it down to help you see how an AI research app could help at each step of the process.

How does generative AI work?

Generative AI apps combine a large knowledge base with a language model. The knowledge base could range anywhere from a massive website, such as Amazon.com, to the internet at large. A language model programs the computer to engage in a simulated conversation with a user.

These elements of generative AI function through machine learning. That means the computer program teaches itself the data within the knowledge base. The system then processes that information for the user, communicating the data through the language model.

How AI could help with outlining

Using generative AI involves the following steps to create an outline and structure for a research paper.

  1. Discovery
    a. Create a specific, relevant, and holistic query to use as a prompt in the AI app. The more detailed and targeted to your results, the more likely you will may find helpful answers to guide your research.
    b. Enter your query into the generative AI to prompt the search.
    c. Execute the search and read the results.
  2. Preparation
    a. Take notes on the generated results.
    b. Check the facts and data of these results for valid sources to verify the information and capture resources to cite in your paper.
    c. Draft an outline combining your hypothesis and these results.

Using AI to help create your paper’s structure

  1. Architecture
    a. Build structure for your paper with short summaries for each section in your outline that hit the key points. Use the generative AI results as a starting point from which you could write in your own words.
    b. Check the flow of this story for logic and to ensure you cover all the points you wish to make in your research analysis.
    c. Edit your content and ensure that it’s either your original work or quotations with explicit citations for the sources used.

Conclusion

AI research apps offer many helpful ways to make writing easier. With our ethical guidelines and your big ideas, you could save time and improve the quality of your research papers with AI. From ideation to actual writing, an AI research tool exists just to help you make it happen.

Click our links to learn more about what AI can could do to help you reach your research goals.

The True Story of Thanksgiving

In 2023, a projected 55+ million1 people in the United States will take to the road and sky to celebrate Thanksgiving with family and friends. Children will don Pilgrim hats in school plays, and large inflated turkeys will bobble and glow on front lawns.

The story of Thanksgiving has morphed into an inspiring story of welcoming indigenous peoples and grateful colonists who come together in friendship and peace. But historians argue that this story is replete with falsehoods that sugarcoat the complexities of the events before, during, and after the feast of 1621.

The Pilgrims

To better understand the dynamics of that feast in 1621, it could be helpful to have a better understanding of the group of 102 men and women who landed in Plymouth in 1620.

In 1534, England was a Roman Catholic Nation. When King Henry VIII came into power, he established a new national church known as the Church of England. While based on Catholicism, he and later his daughter Elizabeth introduced changes to differentiate this new church from the Roman Catholic Church.

Some people felt that the changes were not enough, however. They wanted to practice a more “pure” version of Christianity that was simpler and less structured. These individuals became known as “Puritans.” Another more radical faction, identified as “Separatists,” went a step further, insisting that the Church of England was irreformable. They called for the creation of entirely new and separate church.

Both groups were persecuted since, in the early 1600s, it was illegal to be part of a church other than the Church of England. The Separatists eventually relocated to the Netherlands, where they were able to practice their religion. However, after about 10 years they felt that this solution was unsatisfactory, and they decided that a small group of them would leave the Netherlands to establish a settlement in the “New World” that would tolerate religious freedom.

The Pilgrims, however, were not for religious freedom. They believed their way of worshiping God was the only way, and they were intolerant of any digressions. In fact, while their initial plan was supposedly to settle in the northern part of the Virginia Colony—which was actually the first permanent settlement by the English in North America—some believe that they never planned on settling there at all, wanting instead to be as far from Anglican control as possible.

 

The Wampanoags

The Wampanoags tribe, one of many nations of Native Americans living in North America when the Pilgrims arrived, have lived in the vicinity of what is now Massachusetts and Rhode Island for over 12,000 years. In the 1600s, there were nearly 70 Wampanoag villages spread across that area.

The Wampanoag were semi-nomadic, moving seasonally among fixed sites. They hunted and fished and cultivated crops such as corn and squash.

Each Wampanoag tribe had its own leader, and they, in turn, answered to the Wampanoag “Massasoit,” or “paramount leader.” When the Pilgrims arrived in 1620, that leader was Ousamiquin.

While the Wampanoags were the first tribe that the Pilgrims encountered when they landed in Plymouth, the reverse is not true —the Wampanoag’s interactions with Europeans did not start with the Pilgrims. For years, English and French fishermen and explorers had clashed with the Wampanoags, capturing them and other Native Americans for slave trade. These explorers also brought with them disease. Between 1616 and 1619, a period known as the “Great Dying,” an outbreak of disease ravaged the villages of the Wampanoag, wiping out up to 90% of the population.

In fact, Squanto, a member of the Wampanoag who spoke English and was known for helping the pilgrims survive in their new environment, had learned English because he had spent years in captivity in Spain and England.

The Meeting of the Pilgrims and the Wampanoag

The Pilgrims and Wampanoag did not encounter each other right away. It wasn’t until March 1621 that English-speaking Samoset and Squanto entered Plymouth carrying a message from Ousamiquin, who wanted to negotiate a peace treaty with the Pilgrims. In the subsequent treaty , the Pilgrims and Wampanoags agreed not to harm one another and to protect each other from outside attacks.

According to some historians, this treaty was initiated by Ousamiquin not so much as a gesture of friendship but as a way for him to fend off attacks by the Narragansett, a neighboring tribe who had been trying to subjugate the Wampanoag people. Despite periodic episodes of tension, both parties honored the treaty until after the death of Ousamiquin in 1661. (The subsequent fallout between the Wampanoags and New England colonies that led to the devastating King Philip’s War is a story for another article.)

The treaty might have saved the Plymouth colony from destruction. The first winter the Pilgrims experienced was brutal—about half of them died from the harsh conditions that they were unused to. In the spirit of cooperation fostered by the treaty, the Wampanoags taught the Pilgrims how to grow crops such as corn and beans and generally how to survive in their new environment. By October 1621, they had built a number of crude houses and common buildings and had propagated a bountiful harvest.

Which takes us to the events of what is known as the first Thanksgiving. Perhaps one of the biggest misconceptions surrounding the story of Thanksgiving is that the Pilgrims intended their celebration to include the Wampanoags. In fact, there is no record of the Pilgrims having invited the Wampanoags to their feast. Many accounts of the festival maintain that the reason the Wampanoags were even there at all was that they heard the sound of guns being fired in celebration and came to investigate. The ensuing three days could likely have been characterized more by tension and suspicion than friendship and goodwill.

Another myth is that these festivities constitute the “first” Thanksgiving in the New World. In reality, Native Americans in North America had been giving thanks for bountiful harvests for years. And there are recorded accounts of thanksgiving celebrations in the U.S. that occurred long before the Pilgrims arrived. In fact, some consider the first thanksgiving to be the 1556 celebration between Spanish settlers and about 200 Indians in St. Augustine, Florida .)

Story of Thanksgiving

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The Evolution of Thanksgiving

In 1863, during the Civil War, President Abraham Lincoln proclaimed Thanksgiving a national holiday as a way to foster unity between the north and south. But Lincoln’s proclamation did not mention anything about the Pilgrims or the celebration that took place in 1621. So how did the Thanksgiving we celebrate today become equated with the story of the Pilgrims and Wampanoags in 1621?

It may well likely have been due to the influence of author Sarah Josepha Hale. Hale was the author of “Mary Had a Little Lamb,” but her achievements go far beyond the penning of that rhyme. She was the writer and editor of an influential women’s magazine, Godey’s Lady’s Book, and is also attributed as having been the driving force behind Lincoln’s Thanksgiving proclamation. For years she had used her writings to urge politicians to establish Thanksgiving as a national holiday. A letter she wrote to President Lincoln about the matter is often considered to be instrumental in Lincoln’s decision.

Hale herself made the connection between the Pilgrims and the first Thanksgiving in an editorial she wrote in 1865: “To the Eastern colonies we must look for the beginning of this custom. The Pilgrim Fathers incorporated a yearly thanksgiving day among the moral influences they sent over the New World.” And in 1872 she wrote a hymn in tribute to Thanksgiving, referencing the “faithful Pilgrim Fathers” and “Their first Thanksgiving Day.”

The connection was repeated by newspapers and other magazines, began appearing in school textbooks, and took hold. We’ll never know for sure why Sarah Hale made this connection, or whether she was indeed the one responsible for popularizing it. By some accounts, it was a group of pilgrim descendants who planted the seeds in 1769 because they felt that their cultural authority was eroding and that New England was becoming less relevant with other colonies. Whatever the origins, equating Thanksgiving with the Pilgrims and Wampanoags perpetuates a story fraught with inaccuracies and insensitive to the realities of the plight of Native Americans in this country.

National Day of Mourning

In 1970, Frank James, then leader of the Wampanoag, was invited to speak at a Thanksgiving state dinner marking the anniversary of the Mayflower. But James would not be silenced about the treatment of his people, and he wrote a scathing account of how the Pilgrims stole food, desecrated graves, and spread disease among his people.

The organizers found the speech to be inappropriate and was “uninvited” to the dinner.

Instead, he led supporters to Cole’s Hill, next to the statue of Ousamiquin, and read his speech. This became the first official National Day of Mourning, which has been celebrated in that location every day since.

Conclusion

So where does all this unraveling of history leave us? Should we stop celebrating Thanksgiving altogether? Not necessarily. But it is important to understand what really happened, both before and after 1621, to be cognizant of the misconceptions that have been perpetuated, and to be sensitive to the lasting effect the myths of Thanksgiving have had on the Wampanoag and Native Americans as a whole.

Sources

1Projections by AAA: https://newsroom.aaa.com/2023/11/aaa-thanksgiving-holiday-travel-period-forecast/#:~:text=WASHINGTON%2C%20DC%20(November%2013%2C,the%20Thanksgiving%20holiday%20travel%20period*.

Wait—That’s a Real Job?! 17 of the Weirdest Jobs Out There

What types of people tend to go for the weirdest jobs?

People who go after out-of-the box jobs may be described as:

  • Adventurous
  • Open
  • Extroverted
  • Confident
  • Brave
  • Insane!

We dug up 17 of the weirdest jobs out there. . . .

  1. Toques (Electro-shockers): In Mexico, shocking drunk people is a job! Why? Some imbibers want to get a better buzz on—others think it sobers them up.
  2. Cuddle professional: Get paid to have platonic snuggle sessions with lonely people.
  3. Professional Mourner: The perfect job for the morbid folks or aspiring actors who can tear up on command at funerals.
  4. Chicken Sexer: How does squeezing a baby chick until it pees and then examining its genitalia sound? Pass?
  5. Professional Ear Cleaners: This is a traditional art in India—and involves exactly what the name suggests.
  6. Worm Picker: This involves some bright, early mornings of picking and packing the best worms for fisherman.
  7. Pet Food Tester: If you have a discerning palate and the desire to chew dog food, this job is for you!
  8. Body Farm Caretaker: Scientists hire people to comb for maggots on dead bodies. Fun!
  9. Roadkill Cleaner: This doesn’t really require explanation, but some cleaners even take home the corpses. For what, we didn’t ask….
  10. Vomit Collector: Somebody has to clean the vomit off amusement park rides. It could be you!
  11. Breath Odor Evaluator: Use your nose to determine when gum or toothpaste works—and unfortunately, when it doesn’t.
  12. Flatulence Smell Reducer: Help underwear companies keep the fart smell contained. For real.
  13. Portable Toilet Cleaners: If you’ve ever had to use a Porta-Potty, you’re probably not eager to send in your application.
  14. Gross Stunt Tester: Someone has to figure out which stunts create the best gross-out factor for reality shows. Bon appetit!
  15. Head Lice Technician: This involves lice, a comb, a strong stomach, and a lot of patience.
  16. Diaper Service Worker: This dirty job requires you to clean cloth diapers. Enough said.
  17. Bacon Critic: Hey, there are actually some amazing, delicious non-traditional jobs out there!
Weirdest Jobs 2023

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Why do people pursue these wacky jobs?

There may be many reasons to pursue an “alternative” career:

  • Possibly allowed to make your own rules
  • Escaping the boring
  • Being paid to be weird
  • Enjoying the macabre
  • Being an animal lover (or hater)
  • Following your (strange) dreams
  • Bragging rights!

What is a non-traditional job?

There are two ways to look at non-traditional jobs:

  1. It’s a career where one sex comprises 25% or less of the workforce. For women, an example is a taxi driver or firefighter. For men, childcare workers and dental hygienists are non-traditional jobs.1
  2. An off-the-wall, crazy role that you would never imagine is actually a real job!

Are there non-traditional jobs in traditional fields?

These aren’t quite as crazy as the ones above, but they do exist!

Food

  • Fortune cookie writer
  • Egg peeler
  • Gum chewer

Accounting

  • Forensic accountant
  • Sports accountant
  • Entertainment accountant

Healthcare

  • Medical illustrator
  • Space psychologist
  • Wound-care specialist

Travel

  • Dog surfing coach
  • Manners police
  • Sewer guide

Teaching

  • Leadership coach
  • Historical consultant
  • Sports coach

Psychology

  • Traffic psychologist
  • Aviation psychologist
  • Art therapist

Marketing

  • Meme manager
  • Simplicity engineer
  • Data storyteller

Science

  • Firework designer
  • Snake milker
  • Sexologist

Technology

  • Ethical hacker
  • Crowdfunding specialist
  • Video game tester

Where would someone search to find these jobs?

A good place to start may be to search for “crazy” or “cool” jobs in your field. Once you find out what’s out there, you could seek out companies that employ these roles. Check out professional organizations, search company websites, investigate industry social media sites, and do some research on job boards and LinkedIn.

 

Sources

[i]dol.gov/wb/stats/nontraditional_occupations.htm | [ii]thrillist.com/travel/nation/the-15-weirdest-jobs-in-the-world | [iii]neweurope.eu/article/top-ten-weirdest-jobs-world | list25.com/25-of-the-weirdest-jobs-on-earth | lolwot.com/20-of-the-most-bizarre-jobs-people-have-around-the-world | [iv]scoopwhoop.com/inothernews/weird-jobs-of-the-world | [v]thefiscaltimes.com/Articles/2011/08/25/10-Dirty-Jobs-That-Nobody-Wants | [vi]extracrispy.com/culture/136/now-hiring-extra-crispy-is-looking-for-a-bacon-critic | [vii]jobs.net/article/cb-196-talent-network-restaurant-9-unusually-weird-jobs-in-the-food-industry | [viii]roberthalf.com/accountemps/job-seekers/career-center/career-advice-and-job-search-tips/beyond-the-traditional-5-unusual-types-of-accounting-jobs | [ix]healthline.com/health-news/weird-jobs-in-the-medical-field-you-never-thought-about-123015#2 | [x]brazen.com/blog/archive/job-search/beyond-the-blackboard-8-unusual-and-in-demand-teaching-careers | [xi]verywell.com/cool-psychology-jobs-2794938 | [xii]careerprofiles.com/blog/hiring-innovative-talent/6-crazy-new-titles-for-marketers-and-what-they-mean | [xiii]livescience.com/37284-weirdest-science-jobs.html | [xiv]complex.com/pop-culture/2014/06/15-weird-tech-jobs-you-never-knew-existed-but-wish-you-had

10 Top-Paying Careers Requiring a Bachelor’s Degree

 

Looking to make a career move? Earning a bachelor’s degree could help open doors to high-paying professions. In fact, the annual median salary for bachelor’s degree holders is over $30,000 more than the median salary of those with just a high school diploma, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS). In this article, we rounded up ten top-paying professions that typically require a bachelor’s degree at the entry level. Learn more about what each career path is all about—and decide if one could be perfect for you!

Top-Paying Careers Requiring a Bachelor’s Degree

In this article, we list 10 top-paying careers that typically require an bachelor’s degree at the entry level, as specified by the BLS.

1 Computer and information systems managers


What they do

Computer and information systems managers are responsible for computer-related activities in an organization. Chief information officers (CIOs) and chief technology officers (CTOs) are types of computer and information systems managers that lead and direct their organization’s technology strategy, including identifying new technology that could be beneficial. IT security managers oversee network and data security to keep information safe. And IT directors are typically in charge of the IT department, including hiring staff, managing the budget, and more

Typical entry-level education

Bachelor’s degree in computer and information technology or a related field

Median annual salary, 2023:

$169,510 per year

Projected employment, 2032

643,300

2 Architectural and engineering managers


What they do

Architectural and engineering managers plan and supervise architecture and engineering projects. They may do research to understand a project’s scope, create detailed plans and budgets, hire and supervise staff, and make production schedules, among other duties. These professionals not only need to understand the ins and outs of managing teams and projects to keep jobs on track, but they also need knowledge of architecture and engineering to inform their work.

Typical entry-level education

Bachelor’s degree in engineering or architecture

Median annual salary, 2023:

$165,370 per year

Projected employment, 2032

209,700

3 Airline and commercial pilots


What they do

Pilots fly and navigate aircraft, including airplanes and helicopters. Airline pilots usually work for airlines that carry passengers and cargo on a set schedule, while commercial pilots typically perform charter flights, crop dusting, and other unscheduled activities. Both kinds of pilot are responsible for duties such as checking the condition of the aircraft, communicating with air traffic control, and monitoring aircraft systems throughout the flight to ensure a safe journey.   

Typical entry-level education

A bachelor’s degree in any field; flight training

Median annual salary, 2023:

$171,210 per year

Projected employment, 2032

148,100

4 Natural sciences managers


What they do

Natural sciences managers typically oversee the work of scientists within an organization or laboratory. For instance, they may manage chemists, physicists, or biologists. Natural sciences managers often oversee activities such as research and development, testing, quality control, and production. Their focus could vary depending on the type of organization they work for. For instance, they may manage projects related to advancing scientific knowledge or developing a new kind of product.

Typical entry-level education

Bachelor’s degree or higher in a scientific discipline

Median annual salary, 2023:

$157,740 per year

Projected employment, 2032

90,500

5 Financial managers


What they do

Financial managers help organizations reach their financial goals. They do this through a variety of activities, from preparing financial statements and forecasts to analyzing market trends to find opportunities. There are many kinds of financial manager, each handling different aspects of a company’s finances. For instance, cash managers control the flow of money in a firm. Treasurers direct their organization’s budget. And controllers are typically in charge of preparing financial reports and may oversee their organization’s audit, accounting, and budget departments.

Typical entry-level education

Bachelor’s degree in business, economics, or a related field

Median annual salary, 2023:

$156,100 per year

Projected employment, 2032

919,200

6 Advertising, promotions, and marketing managers


What they do

Advertising, promotions, and marketing managers are responsible for creating interest in products and services. This involves activities such as planning and budgeting campaigns, developing promotional strategies, and managing staff such as creative teams. Managers may use market research to better understand their potential customers as well as the competition. They may also work directly with clients to negotiate contracts and make recommendations for how to position new products, reach more customers, and more.   

Typical entry-level education

Bachelor’s degree in marketing or a related field

Median annual salary, 2022:

$156,580 per year

Projected employment, 2032

413,300

7 Computer hardware engineers


What they do

These professionals design and develop computer hardware, from entire computer systems to components such as circuit boards, processors, and routers. This hardware is essential for many modern devices, including mobile phones, cars, and home appliances. Besides designing systems and components, computer hardware engineers may oversee the manufacturing process and test the hardware to make sure it works as intended. Since hardware and software are typically designed to work together, computer hardware engineers may work closely with software developers.

Typical entry-level education

Bachelor’s degree in computer engineering or a related field

Median annual salary, 2023:

$138,080 per year

Projected employment, 2032

81,600

8 Petroleum engineers


What they do

Petroleum engineers devise methods for extracting oil and gas from the earth. Because oil and gas deposits are found in underground rock formations, engineers must develop ways to access those deposits by drilling. They may design drilling equipment, plan how best to extract the oil and gas, and monitor operations. Several kinds of petroleum engineers may be involved in this process. For instance, drilling engineers figure out the optimal way to drill for oil and gas, while production engineers oversee the wells once drilling is completed.  

Typical entry-level education

Bachelor’s degree in petroleum engineering or a related field

Median annual salary, 2023:

$135,690 per year

Projected employment, 2032

21,900

9 Database administrators and architects


What they do

Database administrators and architects build or manage systems to store data and keep it secure. They may design and build databases, regularly back up data, and make sure users can access the information they need. Typically, database architects are responsible for designing and building new databases, while database administrators monitor database operations for performance as well as provide support to users. However, these roles may have overlapping duties.

Typical entry-level education

Bachelor’s degree in computer and information technology or a related field.

Median annual salary, 2023:

$117,450 per year

Projected employment, 2032

161,600

10 Top executives


What they do

Top executives keep organizations running smoothly. They typically set goals for the organization as well as plan strategies and lead teams to ensure these goals are met. Many types of organizations employ top executives—from companies to governments to schools. For instance, Chief Executive Officers (CEOs) usually provide overall leadership and direction for companies and other types of organizations. General and operations managers may handle a variety of administrative and management tasks. And school superintendents oversee school districts, handle budgets, and help keep student achievement on track.

Typical entry-level education

Bachelor’s degree in an area related to their work

Median annual salary, 2023:

$103,840 

Projected employment, 2032

3,912,000

 

Source: https://www.bls.gov/

Based on national data, not school-specific information. Conditions in your area may vary. Accessed 8/9/2023. 

 

More than a Mom: The Reality of Today’s Working Mother

Working Mom Stats

You don’t need to be a mother to know that moms are capable of some pretty fantastic and seemingly unbelievable feats. Over the last century, a mother’s role of being designated to the home has evolved to incorporate working women into the world. “Working moms” have also become such a common idea in households across America that it’s almost assumed that if you’re a mother, you’re working as well. Everyone probably knows at least one working mother, but do you know just how many mothers juggle working and raising children simultaneously? According to the Department of Labor, in 2022 there were 21.7 million working mothers in the United States with children under the age of 18.1 That’s like if the entire population of Florida consisted of working moms!2 The increase of working mothers in America made a gradual but significant increase from 1975 and peaked around 2005.3 And while in 1960, only 11% of women were the sole breadwinners of the household, that number rose to 40% in 2012.3 The Women’s Bureau of the Department of Labor reports that the median weekly earnings for mom in 2022 was $908—which, based in a 52-week year, comes to an annual salary of $47,216. Fathers, on the other hand, earned $1,316 per week, or $68,432 per year.

“The United States ranks last in government-supported time off for new parents,5 with no weeks of paid leave and 12 weeks of protected leave.”

Working Mothers with New Babies

The length and stipulations of maternity leave in the United States is a hotly debated topic today. The United States ranks last in government-supported time off for new parents,5 with no weeks of paid leave and 12 weeks of protected leave.6 In comparison, Estonia leads the world in leave for new parents, with 108 weeks of paid leave and 180 weeks of protected leave.3

“Sons of working mothers spent more time helping with family and household chores than sons who had stay-at-home mothers. Another interesting finding is that men who grew up with working moms were more likely to seek and encourage a spouse who works as well.”

More Than a Mom : Working Mother

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While there are some mothers who return to work because they wish to, this lack of government-supported family leave causes many mothers to return to work with a new baby at home. According to the U.S. Census Bureau,7 the majority of mothers who had a baby were back at work that year. In addition, women who are more educated were more likely to return to work. Since the Bureau of Labor Statistics reports that those who have earned a bachelor’s degree or higher (based on median earnings for full-time wage and salary workers not broken down by gender) typically earn more per week than those with just a high school diploma,8 it seems as though working mothers new and old may want to consider enhancing their college education.

“The Department of Labor states that the occupation in which the highest number of  moms employed is registered nurses.9” 

You’ll generally find working mothers in nearly every industry you can think of, but there are definitely some occupations that tend to show a higher concentration of working mothers. The Department of Labor9 states that the top ten occupations employing working moms in 2021 were:

  1. Registered nurses  
  2. Elementary and middle school teachers         
  3. Other managers
  4. Secretaries and administrative assistants, excluding legal, medical, and executive
  5. Customer service representatives
  6. First-line supervisors of retail sales workers
  7. Nursing assistants
  8. Maids and housekeeping cleaners
  9. Teaching assistants
  10. Cashiers

In half of these occupations, moms are overrepresents—that is, there are more moms employed than non-moms.

“Some jobs are particularly suited for remote work. Examples include customer service representative and graphic designer.”

Working Mothers Don’t Necessarily Have to Leave the House

The shift towards remote work, particularly working from home, has become a prominent aspect of the modern workforce. This trend has been accelerated by improvements in technology, changes in work culture, and, notably, global events such as the COVID-19 pandemic, which forced many organizations to adapt quickly. Mothers who work at home face a unique challenge: balancing professional responsibilities with the constant presence of their children. However, managing to get work done while kids are around is a skill that many mothers have honed through a combination of creativity, patience, and effective time management.

Some jobs are particularly suited for remote work. Here are some examples.

1 Website Developer


Web developers design, create, and maintain websites.

$92,750

2023 median annual salary

2 Marketing Specialist


These professionals investigate the conditions in local, regional, national, or online markets to assess the potential sales of a product or service or to strategize a marketing or advertising campaign. Learn how to become a Market Research Analyst here!

$74,680

2023 median annual salary

3 Graphic Designer


Graphic designers work with both images and text to develop the production design for applications such as logos, advertisements, brochures, books, and magazines.

$58,910

2023 median annual salary

4 Data Entry Specialist


These specialists are responsible for inputting and managing data in computer systems or databases using specialized software or other tools.

$36,190

2023 median annual salary

5 Customer Service Representative


CS representatives work with customers to answer questions, resolve problems, handle complaints, and process orders.

$39,680

2023 median annual salary

The Future Trend of Working and Stay-at-Home Moms

There will probably never be an answer to debate on whether being a stay-at-home mother or a working mom is better for children, but perhaps there doesn’t need to be one. Some women choose to participate in the workforce and some work out of necessity. An interesting finding by the Pew Research Center is that after 10 years of an increase in working mothers, there seems to be a switch over to an increase in stay-at-home mothers.3 The researchers note that this may be due to the fact that would-be stay-at-home moms entered the workforce during the economic uncertainty that preceded and followed the Great Recession of 2007.

No matter how much the numbers of working mothers rise and fall, there will typically be millions of working women who need to, but also want to, develop their careers while also raising children. The traditional nuclear family—stay-at-home mother, bread-winning father, and two children—has generally become a relic of the past, and the idea of a “traditional” family seems to be becoming more and more indefinable as the twenty-first century marches on.

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Sources

1https://www.bls.gov/news.release/famee.t04.htm2https://worldpopulationreview.com/states3https://www.elearners.com/education-resources/careers/todays-working-mother/4https://www.dol.gov/agencies/wb/data/mothers-families/median-weekly-earnings-child5https://www.business.org/hr/workforce-management/paid-maternity-leave-across-the-world/6https://www.dol.gov/general/topic/benefits-leave/fmla7https://www.census.gov/library/stories/2019/08/are-women-really-opting-out-of-work-after-they-have-babies.html8https://www.bls.gov/emp/chart-unemployment-earnings-education.htm9https://www.dol.gov/agencies/wb/data/mothers-families/occupations-largestnumbermothers10https://www.bls.gov/oes/current/oes131161.htm11https://www.bls.gov/ooh/arts-and-design/graphic-designers.htm12https://www.bls.gov/oes/current/oes439021.htm13https://www.bls.gov/ooh/office-and-administrative-support/customer-service-representatives.htm14https://www.bls.gov/ooh/computer-and-information-technology/web-developers.htm

Germs: Killers and Contaminators

WARNING: What you are about to read may make you seriously germophobic!

The world contains more harmful germs than you might realize. And the places germs do and don’t hide out may really surprise you. Of course, icky microorganisms are not entirely avoidable, and you shouldn’t let fear of germs take over your life. But if you have small children, you are planning to enter a medical profession, or you just want to be savvier about staying clean and avoiding illness, you’re in the right place!

A Brief History of Germs

“Louis Pasteur, the father of pasteurization, was also an important figure in the early study of germs. He proved that microorganisms present in the air could also grow on food, causing it to spoil.”

Naturally, germs have been around forever. But it wasn’t until the 1800s that people finally began to accept and understand the germ theory of disease. According to the Association of the British Pharmaceutical Industry, before then most people didn’t realize that germs could make them sick, or that hand washing could prevent illness and save lives. In fact, the Hungarian physician Ignaz Semmelweiss discovered that medical students often delivered babies after dissecting corpses, failing to wash their hands in between! When Semmelweiss insisted that students start washing their hands, the death rate of new mothers dropped significantly.

Germs, Killers and Contaminators infographic

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Louis Pasteur, the father of pasteurization, was also an important figure in the early study of germs. He proved that microorganisms present in the air could also grow on food, causing it to spoil. Inspired by Pasteur, a Scottish surgeon names Joseph Lister began using carbolic acid to clean his patients’ wounds. And once penicillin was discovered by accident in 1928, the war on germs was in full swing!

“But how long do germs survive? Certain viruses could live on your hands for as long as an hour, giving you plenty of time to spread your cold to everyone in the office or classroom! Certain kinds of bacteria and protozoa, like staph and Giardia, may be able to live for months outside a human body.”

How Are Germs Spread?

There are several common means by which germs are spread. One obvious way is from nose, mouth, or eyes to hand to others—like when you have a cold and you shake someone’s hand after you’ve been blowing your nose all day. You could also transmit germs from your hands to food that you are preparing. And in the case of food borne bacteria like salmonella, it’s all too easy to transmit germs from food to hands to food; an example is handling raw chicken and then making a salad without properly washing your hands first. Caring for kids and animals could lead to the spread of germs, too.

But how long do germs survive? Certain viruses could live on your hands for as long as an hour, giving you plenty of time to spread your cold to everyone in the office or classroom! Certain kinds of bacteria and protozoa, like staph and Giardia, may be able to live for months outside a human body. And fungi like Candida, or yeast, may hang out for months on anything from your towels to your favorite lipstick. Talk about gross!

The germs you encounter in innocent places could do some serious damage. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the 2020–21 flu season saw as many as 5,000 people die from influenza in the U.S.”5

What Public Places Are the Germiest?

If people had to take a guess, they’d might say public toilets are hotspots for dangerous germs. The surprising answer is that most toilets are not as dirty as you might think. With about 1,000 units of bacteria per square inch,1 the average toilet seat is about 10 times cleaner than your mobile phone!2 A typical bathroom floor, on the other hand, could home to as many as 2 million bacteria per square inch.3 Some other surprising culprits include restaurant menus, bathroom soap dispensers, steering wheels, and airplane armrests. And don’t forget the bottoms of your shoes, which may each carry as many as 421,000 units of bacteria, including E. coli, meningitis, and Klebsiella pneumonia.4

Schools are also breeding grounds for bacteria, with the worst offenders being water fountains, cafeteria trays, and faucet handles. As reported by Today’s Parent, kids who enter daycare may be exposed to all kinds of harmful germs, like cold viruses, stomach bugs, and conjunctivitis (pinkeye). Shared toys, food, and being in close contact with other kids are usually to blame. And consider that a single bathroom for an entire classroom of kids may mean infrequent hand washing; in fact, over half of school kids claimed they did not have time to scrub up before meals.

The germs you encounter in innocent places could do some serious damage. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the 2020–21 flu season saw as many as 5,000 people die from influenza in the U.S.5 A Methicillin-resistant strain of staph, which is found in many public places including taxis, may cause as many as 80,000 invasive infections each year (CDC).6 And 1.2 million people get sick from salmonella annually (CDC)7; that’s as if the entire population of Dallas, Texas contracted this dangerous foodborne illness!

And Then There’s COVID-19…

The advent of COVID-19 in 2019 put a whole new spin on germs. Over 1 million people have died from COVID-19 in the United States—it’s serious business.

COVID-19 spreads via droplets and very small particles that an infected person breathes out. Others might breathe in these droplets and particles, or they might land on their eyes, nose, or mouth. In some circumstances, these droplets may contaminate surfaces they touch.

The CDC provides a number of recommendations about preventative actions that could be taken, such as improving ventilation, getting tested if you have symptoms of COVID, and staying at home if you test positive for COVID. 

You may think you already practice frequent hand washing. But actually, most people don’t wash their hands correctly. For starters, you need to scrub your hands long enough to actually kill germs, which means at least 20 seconds. You can sing yourself the ‘Happy Birthday’ song twice in your head to make sure you’ve spent enough time under the faucet!”

How to Protect Against Germs

An obvious solution to staying healthy may be washing your hands regularly. The CDC recommends washing your hands before, during, and after handling food (including pet food), eating, caring for the sick, coming into contact with human or animal waste, touching garbage, tending to a wound, using the toilet, and coughing or sneezing. That list is not exhaustive, but it’s safe to say there are many times throughout the day when it’s important to scrub up! You may think you already practice frequent hand washing. But actually, most people don’t wash their hands correctly. For starters, you need to scrub your hands long enough to actually kill germs, which means at least 20 seconds. You can sing yourself the “Happy Birthday” song twice in your head to make sure you’ve spent enough time under the faucet! Another little-known hand washing fact is that how you dry your hands makes all the difference. As reported by Infection Control Today, wet hands are about 1,000 times likelier to spread bacteria than dry hands,8 and rubbing your hands together while drying may actually cause bacteria to multiply. The CDC suggests that using paper towels may be a better option, because they physically wipe bacteria off your hands.

”Germs live in your body, on plants and animals, and even in the air you breathe. In short, it’s impossible to eliminate germs from your life, and you might go crazy if you tried! In most cases, your immune system protects you from infection, allowing you to go about your day without worrying too much.”

If you don’t have access to soap and water, hand sanitizer that contains at least 60% alcohol may be an okay stand-in. Other common sense tips include avoiding people who are sick, regularly disinfecting surfaces, and keeping your hands away from your eyes, nose, and mouth. A more unusual tip: consider a fist-bump instead of a handshake, since it spreads about 1/10 the amount of germs of a handshake.

Should You Worry?

Germs live in your body, on plants and animals, and even in the air you breathe. In short, it’s impossible to eliminate germs from your life, and you might go crazy if you tried! In most cases, your immune system protects you from infection, allowing you to go about your day without worrying too much. Of course, almost everyone has experienced a nasty cold or bug they wished they could have avoided, and some infections are even life-threatening. Understanding the dangers and how to avoid them is important to staying safe, healthy, and (mostly) in control of the nasty germs you encounter!

Dive Right In!

Now that you probably have a better understanding of germs—what they are, and how to combat them—you might feel better about pursuing a healthcare career. There are numerous opportunities in healthcare, from nurses to doctors, surgical technicians to home health aides. Educational requirements vary for different healthcare occupations, but some positions only require a certificate, which could take anywhere from several weeks to a year.

By following the recommendations in this article, and any requirements in your place of employment, you could stay germ-free in your healthcare career!

Sources

1https://granitegold.com/blogs/cleaning/how-dirty-are-remote-controls-and-phones-as-opposed-to-obviously-dirty-places-like-toilet-seats | 2https://www.ualberta.ca/public-health/news/2017/september/is-your-cell-phone-really-10-times-dirtier-than-a-toilet-seat.html#:~:text=The%20news%20story%20highlighted%20two,bacteria%20than%20a%20toilet%20seat | 3https://www.cleanlink.com/hs/article/5-Adjustments-Cleaning-Pros-Make-To-Improve-Restrooms–29868#:~:text=Restroom%20floors.,higher%20than%20a%20sanitary%20surface | 4http://www.treehugger.com/green-home/ | 5https://www.cdc.gov/flu/about/burden/preliminary-in-season-estimates.htm#:~:text=During%20the%202021%2D2022%20influenza,during%20the%202011%2D2012%20season | 6https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4739597/# | 7https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/your-health/about-covid-19.html | 8https://www.cdc.gov/salmonella/index.html | 9https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5074182/

Exploring Undergraduate Certificates: A Pathway to Focused Learning and Career Enhancement

Undergraduate students are increasingly earning competency certificates to develop proficiency in a field. In fact, certificates are the fastest growing post-secondary credential. That’s in comparison to associate’s and bachelor’s degree programs which typically cost students more in time, money, and commitment.

Certificates are designed for today’s students with targeted education and skill enhancement at an affordable and faster rate than many degree programs. They may also boost a student or employee’s resume with industry specific training to help them compete in the job market. For this reason, many undergraduate students pursue certificates as a skill step ladder. Sometimes this can be done in conjunction with a degree program and other times in lieu of one.

Understanding Undergraduate Certificates

These programs include short term and focused learning and skills attainment for earning a certificate. Certificates provide verification for the required work to show mastery of a specific subject area. Courses taken to earn a certificate focus on concentrated education, typically without including general study courses. That’s why a certificate usually recquire less time than the interim it takes to complete a degree program.

Certificate programs tend to vary in length, but generally take less than two years with many lasting less than a year. Students often have a thorough understanding of their specific interest when they’ve earned a certificate. On the other hand, they usually take a broader set that includes general courses for a degree.


The cost of certificate programs may vary. For instance, if students work toward a certificate within a four-year public college program, that may cost more than earning a certificate at a two-year public university. Certification programs usually cost less than degree programs.
Sometimes students earn certificates as stepping stones on the path to completing their degree program. Some schools require that certificate program students enroll in their undergraduate degree program. In fact, with degree enrollments in decline, many universities are starting certificate programs to boost their active student numbers.

Admissions and Prerequisites

Certificate programs may have different admission requirements depending on the school. But there are general guidelines that likely apply to many certificate programs. For instance, many certificate programs require applications and associated fees as well as a high school, or equivalent, degree.

Some certification programs may also require that enrollees have specific coursework on their transcript and maybe even cite a minimum GPA for those classes. Others could request a transcript for all former courses completed. Prerequisite classes sometimes count toward your certificate courses. So, submitting transcripts might be beneficial even if it’s not required. Typically, SATs and ACTs aren’t required for certificate programs.

Schools may include a certificate program along with their course offering for enrolled students. In these cases, eligibility for the certificate program may include a specific education level, for instance, senior year. Program admissions departments could also require a proposal or letter of intent, and some also want a resume. Other schools typically also require that students earning a certificate remain enroll in their degree program throughout the certification process.

Combining with Degree Programs

Undergraduate degree program enrollments are declining. So, many schools are offering certificate programs in order to boost student numbers. In fact, certificates are the fastest growing post-secondary credential. When combined with a degree program, certificates could benefit students as well as schools. That’s because certificate holders often learn industry specific training that may boost their career enhancement. This kind of specific skill-based learning often rounds out resumes with proof of relevant skill development for credentials that could stand out from the rest. Certificate programs also help schools enhance their offering for current students.

Credential stacking with certificates could provide a path for enrolled students to create a more versatile skillset. This strategy typically involves a sequence of targeted education and skills courses. Students can typically proceed through a certificate curriculum on a faster timeline than many traditional degree programs. They could also develop a deeper understanding of relevant tools and how to use them.

Benefits of Pursuing an Undergraduate Certificate

Certificate programs often provide an efficient route for students to earn career credentials, taking less time and money. That’s because these programs usually proceed faster and often cost less than traditional degree programs and are usually online. Benefits like these have potential to make stacking credentials easier and more convenient than a typical accelerated degree program. In fact, students pursuing certificates often earn credits that apply to an undergraduate degree as well. Industries increasingly value, and sometimes request, certification to verify relevant job skills and knowledge. Let’s explore additional benefits to certificate programs.

Diverse fields of study

From business and healthcare to technology and the arts, certificates reach across a diverse range of subjects. Each topic presents opportunities for several certifications. For instance, in healthcare students could pursue certificates in Medical Billing and coding, Phlebotomy, Dental Assistant, Pharmacy Technician, Clinical Medical Assistant, or Emergency Medical Technician (EMT). Earning certificates like these could help expand a student’s resume, give them more flexibility in career choices, and enhance their appeal to potential employers.

Certificate programs give individuals the chance to deepen knowledge in a variety of specific areas. Students may then discover if the career goals they’re considering match their potential job skills and experiences. Even if a nursing student finds out they don’t want to draw blood after earning their Phlebotomy certificate, it helps boost their resume and adds credits toward their degree.

Filling skill gaps

Sometimes certificate programs also help those in the workforce who may be seeking job enhancement. That’s. That’s because when pursuing a certificate, individuals could acquire targeted skills and practical training applicable to their chosen industry. This could serve as professional development to help address skill gaps, enhance employability, and improve job performance.

Some employers encourage, reimburse, or even cover certificate programs for employees as upskilling options. Typically, professional certifications provide validation for mastery of the subject matter and skills developed. These learning outcomes could enhance a certificate holder’s on-the-job practical skills and maybe even create potential for a promotion. So, certifications could benefit the workplace as well as the certified employee.

Flexibility and accessibility

Certificate programs tend to offer more flexibility than traditional degrees thanks to remote and part-time learning options as well as their targeted and accelerated coursework. Colleges are aware that certificate seeker are often also earning a degree or working and want to fit certificate studies into an already busy lifestyle.

Some of the ways schools help make certificates more accessible include part-time options, online learning, and evening classes. These flexible options give students with other commitments a chance to integrate a certificate program into their schedule. An accelerated learning rate also helps enrollees pursue a certificate without too much disruption because these programs often take a year or less. By contrast, traditional degree programs typically require two to four years of full-time enrollment.

Competency certificates hone in on specific skill acquisition and practical training with targeted courses. Certificate students often complete the program requirements without need for general studies classes. This has potential to free up more time for certificate seekers to meet other commitments while also achieving their education objectives.

Who Should Consider Undergraduate Certificates?

Undergraduate certificates often work well for enrolled students pursuing an associate or bachelor’s degree. But these certificate programs may also serve recent high school graduates, working professionals, career changers, as well as anyone seeking to upskill and expand their contribution at work.

Recent high school graduates could enroll in certificate courses as an efficient and cost-effective way to boost their qualifications for entry level opportunities or degree programs. Working professionals may earn a certificate for skill acquisition to help increase their potential for a promotion. Others who may be considering a career transition can pursue certificates to learn job ready skills missing from their resume. This could enhance their employability while also serving as a way to try out aspects of this potential career change.

Benefits of Undergraduate Certificates

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Career Opportunities

Certificate courses may help enhance marketable qualifications for career focused students as well as employed people. Some may jumpstart a career with a 3- or 6-month competency certificate such as web designer, real estate agent, personal trainer, or air traffic controller. These serve as examples for how certificate courses may open entry level career pathways.

Healthcare industry specific training also includes opportunities for career enhancement thanks to certificate programs. From healthcare newcomers earning a phlebotomy certificate to practicing nurses seeking to fast-track credentials for a promotion, certificates serve healthcare practitioners at various levels. Here are specific examples of career opportunities with associated certificate programs.

1 Licensed Practical/Vocational Nurse (LPN)


In the role of an LPN or LVN, you might find yourself tending to elderly patients, whether in their homes or within residential care facilities. The increasing prevalence of conditions such as diabetes and obesity is likely to generate a heightened need for nurses. Additionally, the growing prominence of outpatient care centers could result in an increased demand for LPN positions.

Median annual salary, 2023:

$59,730 per year

Projected employment, 2022-2032

5%

 

2 Surgical Technologist


As a Surgical Technologist, you have the opportunity to support medical teams and surgeons throughout the entire surgical process, including pre-operation, during the procedure, and post-operation. Prior to the surgery, your responsibilities may involve tasks such as sterilizing equipment and preparing the patient. In the course of the operation, you may aid doctors by passing instruments and maintaining an inventory of supplies. Subsequently, your duties could include tasks like applying bandages to the patient and replenishing supplies in the operating room.

Median annual salary, 2023:

$60,610 per year

Projected employment, 2022-2032

5%

 

3 Court Reporter


As a Court Reporters, you have the opportunity to generate verbatim transcriptions during trials, depositions, and various legal proceedings. Simultaneous captioners offer comparable transcriptions for television or presentations in diverse settings, like press conferences and business meetings, catering to individuals who are deaf or hard of hearing.

Median annual salary, 2023:

$63,940 per year

Projected employment, 2022-2032

3%

 

4 Fire Investigator/Inspector


As Fire Investigators/Inspectors, you have the responsibility of examining fire scenes to identify their origin and cause. Your tasks include assessing fire damage, gathering evidence, and conducting witness interviews to reconstruct the events leading to the fire. Additionally, you inspect structures to ensure compliance with fire codes and safety regulations, providing recommendations for improvements as needed. Your role is crucial for preventing future fires and enhancing overall fire safety.

Median annual salary, 2023:

$74,160 per year

Projected employment, 2022-2032

5%

 

Conclusion

Earning an undergraduate certificate could springboard new job opportunities or enhance a stagnant career. Certificate programs offer a variety of flexible learning options from a 3-month online course to a year of skill-based learning on site at a university. You could explore targeted education opportunities like these to deepen your knowledge and career prospects.

Exploring Bootcamps: Accelerate Your Path To Skill Mastery

In today’s rapidly evolving professional landscape, the demand for targeted skills and efficient learning pathways has never been greater. Enter bootcamps—a dynamic approach to education that’s redefining how individuals acquire in-demand skills for a successful career. With an emphasis on intensive learning, career-focused education, and fast-tracking skills, bootcamps are emerging as a powerful means of rapid skill acquisition in a variety of fields.

Gone are the days when a traditional four-year degree was the only path to professional success. In this era of innovation, where industries could transform in the blink of an eye, bootcamps have emerged as a compelling alternative. These programs typically offer an accelerated journey to proficiency, enabling learners to quickly gain skills and knowledge and enter the workforce with a competitive edge.

In this article, we’ll delve into the world of bootcamps, exploring their essence of intensive learning and their laser-focused approach to career-oriented education. Whether you’re a recent high school graduate, a career changer, or someone looking to stay ahead of the curve, join us on a journey to uncover the potential of bootcamp courses.

What Are Bootcamps?

Bootcamps are intensive, short-term education programs that focus on teaching specific skills or subjects within a condensed timeframe. These programs are designed to provide practical, hands-on learning experiences and job-ready training geared to equip individuals with the skills needed for a particular job or career path. Bootcamps typically prioritize real-world application, experiential learning, and industry relevance.

Bootcamps typically cover a wide range of subjects, including coding, data science, digital marketing, cybersecurity, design, healthcare, and more. They aim to bridge the gap between traditional education and the rapidly changing needs of the job market. Bootcamps often emphasize project-based learning, collaboration, and building a portfolio of work to showcase to potential employers.

Key Characteristics

Key characteristics of bootcamps include:

  1. Short duration: Bootcamps are typically shorter than traditional degree programs, lasting anywhere from a few weeks to a few months. This condensed timeframe could allow participants to quickly acquire skills and enter the workforce.
  2. Intensive learning: Bootcamps provide an intensive and immersive education, focusing on hands-on experiences and practical training. Participants often spend a significant portion of their time working on real-world projects.
  3. Focused curriculum: Bootcamps have a specific and focused curriculum—bootcamp courses are tailored to the skills required for a particular job or industry. They cut out general education courses and dive directly into the relevant content.
  4. Industry alignment: Bootcamps are often developed in collaboration with industry experts and employers. This could help ensure that the bootcamp courses are up-to-date and aligned with current industry trends and demands.
  5. Flexible learning options: Bootcamps may be offered in various formats: there are in-person bootcamps and online bootcamps, as well as bootcamps that are full-time, part-time , and self-paced. This flexibility caters to a diverse range of learners and schedules.
  6. Job placement support: Many bootcamps offer job placement assistance, resume building, interview coaching, and networking opportunities to help participants with career transition after completing the program.

It’s important to research and choose reputable bootcamp providers to ensure that the program’s quality, content, and learning outcomes align with your career goals and expectations.

Diverse Bootcamp Domains

The world of bootcamp education is expansive, catering to a multitude of career paths. Aspiring coders could immerse themselves in coding bootcamps, gaining proficiency in programming languages like Python, JavaScript, and Ruby. Meanwhile, web development bootcamps delve into the art of crafting interactive and visually appealing websites, encompassing frontend and backend technologies.

Venturing into the realm of data science, bootcamps equip learners with the analytical skills required to mine insights from complex datasets. Design bootcamps nurture creative talents, teaching the principles of user experience (UX) and user interface (UI) design. Digital marketing bootcamps, on the other hand, guide participants through the intricacies of online advertising, social media strategies, and SEO techniques.

Advantages of Bootcamps

Bootcamps, whether they’re focused on coding, data science, digital marketing, or other fields, offer several advantages that make them an appealing option for individuals seeking to quickly gain practical skills and enter the workforce. Here are some of the key advantages of bootcamps.

  1. Accelerated learning: Bootcamps are designed to provide intensive and focused training within a short period, typically ranging from a few weeks to a few months. This accelerated learning format allows participants to acquire necessary skills in a condensed timeframe.
  2. Practical skills: Bootcamps are known for their hands-on, project-based approach. Participants typically work on real-world projects and scenarios, gaining practical skills that may be directly applicable to the job market.
  3. Industry-relevant content: Bootcamps are often developed in collaboration with industry professionals and employers. This helps to ensure that the curriculum aligns with current industry trends, tools, and technologies, making graduates more marketable to potential employers.
  4. Career switching: Bootcamps could provide a pathway for individuals to switch careers or enter a new field. They offer a streamlined route to acquire the skills needed to transition into a different job role without the time commitment of traditional degree programs.
  5. Networking opportunities: Bootcamps may bring together a diverse group of participants, potentially creating opportunities for networking and collaboration. Connecting with classmates, instructors, and industry professionals could lead to helpful contacts and potential job opportunities.
  6. Supportive environment: Bootcamps strive to provide a supportive learning environment with experienced instructors and mentors who guide participants through the learning process. This support helps participants overcome challenges and stay motivated.
  7. Career services: Many bootcamps provide career services, such as resume building, interview preparation, and job placement assistance. This might be particularly beneficial for those looking to secure employment quickly after completing the program.
  8. Cost and time efficiency: Bootcamps may be more cost effective than traditional degree programs, both in terms of tuition fees and the shorter duration. This could make them an attractive option for individuals looking for a faster return on investment.
  9. Flexibility: Many bootcamps offer a variety of formats, including in-person, online, full-time, and part-time options. This flexibility allows participants to choose a program that could fit their schedule and learning preferences.
  10. Focus on marketable skills: Bootcamp courses tend to focus on skills that are in high demand in the job market. This focus on specific, job-relevant skills could increase graduates’ chances of securing employment in their chosen field.

Who Should Consider Bootcamps

Bootcamps have gained prominence as a dynamic solution for individuals seeking to acquire specific skills, change careers, or stay current in an ever-changing professional landscape.

Bootcamps are not limited to a single demographic; they cater to a broad spectrum of individuals with varying aspirations and goals. Recent graduates find value in bootcamps as a means to bridge the gap between their academic qualifications and the practical skills required by employers. These immersive programs empower them to enter the workforce with a competitive edge, ensuring a smoother transition from academia to industry.

For career switchers, bootcamps provide a streamlined route to enter a new field without committing to a full-fledged degree program. Professionals seeking career enhancement and career growth within their current roles could leverage bootcamps to acquire focused skills that enhance their contributions and open doors to new opportunities. Additionally, lifelong learners and enthusiasts looking to explore new interests find bootcamps to be an accessible and engaging way to gain hands-on experience.

Because one of the standout features of many bootcamps is their flexibility, they may be an attractive option for individuals with busy schedules. Many bootcamps offer part-time, online, and self-paced formats, allowing learners to balance their education with existing commitments. This accessibility democratizes learning, enabling individuals from various walks of life to engage with educational opportunities that might have been otherwise unattainable.

Furthermore, the fast-paced nature of bootcamps is particularly suited for those looking to adapt swiftly to industry changes. With their focused curriculum and practical approach, bootcamps compress the learning curve, equipping participants with relevant skills in a short span.

Bootcamps Infographic

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Choosing the Perfect Bootcamp

With the vast array of bootcamps, finding one that aligns with your goals could be a pivotal step in your educational journey. As you embark on this  path, here are some tips that could guide you in making an informed choice to help maximize your learning experience.

Researching Course Content and Curriculum

The heart of any bootcamp lies in its curriculum. Before enrolling, dive deep into the content of bootcamp courses it resonates with your learning objectives. Scrutinize the topics covered, the depth of material, and the relevance to your desired field. A curriculum should encompass both foundational concepts and advanced techniques, preparing you to tackle real-world challenges.

Evaluating Instructor Qualifications

The quality of instruction could directly impact your learning outcomes. Investigate the qualifications and expertise of the instructors who will guide you through the program. Instructors with practical industry experience and a deep understanding of the subject matter could enhance the value of the bootcamp, offering industry insights that textbooks alone might not provide.

Considering Student Reviews and Testimonials

Peer feedback could offer insights into the effectiveness of a bootcamp. Delve into student reviews and testimonials to gauge the overall satisfaction level and experiences of past participants. Candid insights from those who have walked the same path could provide a realistic view of the bootcamp’s strengths, weaknesses, and the kind of support you could expect.

Analyzing Job Placement Rates and Alumni Success

A significant measure of a bootcamp’s success lies in the employability of its graduates. Investigate the bootcamp’s job placement rates and alumni success stories. High job placement rates might indicate that the bootcamp equips students with the skills needed to secure meaningful employment in their chosen fields. Alumni success stories could showcase how the bootcamp’s training translates into real-world achievements.

Aligning with Personal Learning Goals

Each learner’s journey is unique, driven by personal aspirations and goals. Ensure that the bootcamp you choose aligns with your specific career objectives. Whether you’re seeking to switch careers, upskill within your current role, or explore a new field, the bootcamp should offer a curriculum that caters to your needs.

Considering Format and Flexibility

The format of the bootcamp is another critical factor to consider. Evaluate whether the bootcamp offers in-person, online, part-time, or full-time options that accommodate your schedule and learning preferences. Flexibility in learning format could ensure that you are able to seamlessly integrate education into your life.

While there are many benefits to bootcamps, it’s important for aspiring bootcamp participants to be aware of the challenges that come along with this fast-paced learning experience.

The Intensity of the Curriculum

One of the defining characteristics of bootcamps is their fast-paced curriculum. The condensed nature of these programs means that you’ll typically be exposed to a significant amount of information in a short span of time. This could be both exciting and overwhelming. To tackle this challenge:

  1. Stay organized: Keep track of your learning materials, assignments, and progress. Create a study schedule that breaks down each topic into manageable portions.
  2. Prioritize learning: Understand that not every concept could be mastered instantly. Focus on grasping the core concepts before moving on to more advanced topics.
  3. Practice regularly: Consistent practice may be key to retaining knowledge. Set aside time each day for coding exercises and projects.

Time Commitments

Bootcamps often demand a substantial time commitment. Balancing the demands of the bootcamp with your personal and professional responsibilities might be a real challenge. Here’s how to manage your time effectively:

  1. Set realistic expectations: Acknowledge that the bootcamp could require a significant time investment. Communicate your commitment to friends and family so they understand your schedule.
  2. Time management: Plan your days carefully. Allocate specific blocks of time for learning, practice, breaks, and other commitments.
  3. Avoid burnout: Remember that quality is usually more important than quantity. Overloading yourself might lead to burnout. Take breaks and engage in activities that help you recharge.

Financial Investment

While bootcamps offer an expedited path into the tech industry, they might come with a hefty price tag. Managing the financial aspect could be challenging, but there are ways to ease the burden:

  1. Research payment options: Many bootcamps offer flexible payment plans, scholarships, or income-sharing agreements. Explore these options to determine what works for your financial situation.
  2. Budget wisely: Plan your expenses throughout the bootcamp duration. Cut down on unnecessary costs and prioritize expenditures.
  3. Consider the ROI: Think of the bootcamp as an investment in your future. Research the average salaries for bootcamp graduates in your desired field to assess the potential return on your investment.

Managing Expectations

It’s easy to approach a bootcamp with sky-high expectations. While these programs may be transformative, it’s important to manage your expectations realistically:

  1. Embrace the learning curve: Understand that you’re embarking on a journey of growth. Mistakes and challenges are part of the learning process.
  2. Celebrate small wins: Acknowledge your progress, no matter how incremental it might seem. Each small achievement brings you closer to your goals.
  3. Be patient: Mastery takes time. Don’t expect to be an “expert” by the end of the bootcamp. Instead, focus on building a strong foundation that you could continue to build upon.

Staying Motivated

Bootcamps may require sustained motivation to overcome the hurdles and complete the program successfully. Here’s how to keep your motivation levels up:

  1. Set clear goals: Define your short-term and long-term goals. Having a clear vision of what you’re working toward could keep you motivated during challenging times.
  2. Find a support system: Connect with fellow bootcamp participants, mentors, or online communities. Sharing your experiences and challenges with others may provide emotional support.
  3. Celebrate progress: Regularly reflect on how far you’ve come since the start of the bootcamp. Recognizing your growth could reignite your motivation.

Maintaining Work-Life Balance

The intensive nature of coding bootcamps might blur the lines between work and personal life. Striking a balance may be crucial for your overall well-being:

  1. Set boundaries: Define clear boundaries between your bootcamp commitments and personal time. Avoid the temptation to work around the clock.
  2. Prioritize self-care: Allocate time for activities you enjoy outside of coding. Engage in exercise, hobbies, and spending quality time with loved ones.
  3. Practice mindfulness: Incorporate mindfulness techniques into your routine to stay grounded and reduce stress.

Beyond the Bootcamp: Navigating the Path of Continuous Learning and Growth

Completing a coding bootcamp is a significant accomplishment that could equip you with the skills and knowledge needed to embark on a career in the dynamic world of software development. However, the journey generally doesn’t end there. In fact, it could be just the beginning of a lifelong commitment to continuous learning, growth, and professional development.

Embracing Continuous Learning

The tech industry is constantly evolving, with new programming languages, frameworks, and tools emerging regularly. As a graduate of a coding bootcamp, staying up-to-date with these industry trends may be critical for remaining competitive in the job market. Here’s how you could make continuous learning a cornerstone of your post-bootcamp journey:

  1. Read and research: Regularly read blogs, articles, and online resources to stay informed about the latest developments in technology. Follow thought leaders and industry experts to gain insights into emerging trends.
  2. Online courses: Enroll in online courses, tutorials, and workshops to expand your skill set. There are a plethora of options.
  3. Personal projects: Undertake personal projects that align with your interests. This not only solidifies your learning but also showcases your skills to potential employers.

Networking within the Field

Building connections with professionals in your field could open doors to job opportunities, collaborations, and mentorship. Here’s how you might effectively network after completing your bootcamp:

  1. Attend tech meetups and conferences: Participate in local meetups and conferences related to coding, development, and technology. These events could provide excellent networking opportunities and a chance to learn from industry leaders.
  2. Use online platforms: Join online communities, forums, and social media groups related to your areas of interest. Engage in discussions, ask questions, and share your insights.
  3. Connect with alumni: Reach out to fellow bootcamp graduates. They could provide insights, advice, and potential connections in the industry.

Pursuing Further Education

While a coding bootcamp is designed to provide a solid foundation, some individuals might feel the need to deepen their knowledge further. Advanced bootcamp programs and further education options could help you stand out in a specific area or gain a deeper understanding of complex concepts:

  1. Advanced bootcamps: Many bootcamp providers offer advanced programs that focus on targeted skills or advanced topics. These programs could help you further refine your skills and knowledge.
  2. Formal education: Consider pursuing a formal degree in computer science or a related field if you’re looking to build a strong academic foundation. This option might be particularly appealing if you’re aiming for more research-oriented roles.

Building a Portfolio

As you continue your journey in the tech industry, a well-constructed portfolio could become an important asset. A portfolio is meant to showcase your skills, projects, and accomplishments, providing potential employers with tangible evidence of your capabilities.

Conclusion

Whether you’re a recent graduate, a career switcher, a professional seeking career growth, or simply someone with an insatiable curiosity, bootcamps could offer an impactful educational journey as well as taking a graduate degree programs. With their flexible learning options and industry-relevant curricula, bootcamps stand as a testament to the power of accessible, adaptable, and targeted education in the modern world.

10 Top-Paying Careers Requiring an Associate Degree

 

Pursuing an associate degree could be a great career move, opening up positions that might not be available to those with only a high school diploma or GED. In addition to a broader range of career opportunities, earning an associate degree could also boost your earning potential. The Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) reported that in 2022, the median usual weekly earnings for those who hold an associate degree was $1,005 more than that of those who had only earned their high school diploma.

Top-Paying Careers Requiring an Associate Degree

In this article, we list 10 top-paying careers that typically require an associate degree at the entry level, as specified by the BLS.

Also make sure to check out our article “10 Top In-Demand Careers Requiring an Associate Degree.”

1 Air Traffic Controller


What they do

Air traffic controllers monitor and coordinate the movement of aircraft on the ground and in the air. They direct pilots through takeoff and landing and provide them with updates about weather and other critical information. They use radio equipment, radar, and computers in their work. 

Typical entry-level education

Associate or bachelor’s degree through a Federal Aviation Administration  (FAA)-approved Air Traffic Collegiate Training Initiative

Median annual salary, 2023:

$137,380

Projected employment, 2032

23,000

2 Radiation Therapist


What they do

Radiation therapists administer radiation to cancer patients. They need to calibrate and operate machines such as linear accelerators and make sure they position the machine correctly. They also educate and explain the procedure to patients. 

Typical entry-level education

Associate or bachelor’s degree in radiation therapy

Median annual salary, 2023:

$98,300

Projected employment, 2032

15,900

3 Dental Hygienist


What they do

Dental hygienists clean and polish teeth, removing plaque and tartar. They conduct an examination, looking for any signs of dental disease. They might take X-rays or apply sealants to protect the teeth. They discuss oral health with patients and the importance of diet. 

Typical entry-level education

Associate degree in dental hygiene

Median annual salary, 2023:

$87,530

Projected employment, 2032

219,400

4 Diagnostic Medical Sonographer


What they do

Diagnostic medical sonographers use a special instrument called a transducer to create images of a patient’s organs and tissues. Physicians use the images, referred to as ultrasounds or sonograms, to diagnose disease. There are a number of types of sonographers, including cardiac sonographer, abdominal sonographer, and pediatric sonographer. 

Typical entry-level education

Associate degree in sonography

Median annual salary, 2023:

$80,850

Projected employment, 2032

142,800

5 Avionics Technician


What they do

Avionics technicians repair electric instruments in aircraft. They use using circuit testers, oscilloscopes, and voltmeters to test the instruments and repair any defective components. They also assemble components, install instrument panels, and keep records of maintenance and repairs. 

Typical entry-level education

Associate degree in avionics

Median annual salary, 2023:

$75,400

Projected employment, 2032

161,000

6 Aerospace Engineering and Operations Technologist/ Technician


What they do

These professionals work with equipment used to develop, test, produce, and sustain aircraft and spacecraft. They are responsible for installing, running, and maintaining the equipment, and often meet with aerospace engineers to discuss test results. One type of equipment they might work on is wind tunnels. 

Typical entry-level education

Associate degree in engineering technology or a related field

Median annual salary, 2023:

$75,400

Projected employment, 2032

10,200

7 Respiratory Therapist


What they do

Respiratory therapists work with patients who have breathing issues, ranging from an infant with a collapsed lung to an older patient who has a breathing condition such as asthma or COPD. They examine patients, conduct diagnostic tests, and treat patients to improve their breathing. 

Typical entry-level education

Associate degree in respiratory therapy

Median annual salary, 2023:

$77,960

Projected employment, 2032

133,100

8 Electrical and Electronic Engineering Technologist/Technician


What they do

Electrical and electronic engineering technologists and technicians work with engineers to help design and develop electrical and electronic equipment such as computers. They assemble, calibrate, and repair electrical equipment, draw design diagrams, and monitor the design process for technical issues. They test electronic equipment and analyze the information from the test.  

Typical entry-level education

Associate degree in electrical or electronic engineering technology 

Median annual salary, 2023:

$72,800

Projected employment, 2032

102,500

9 Radiologic Technologist/Technician


What they do

Radiologic techs, also known as radiographers, perform diagnostic tests using equipment such as X-ray machines and CT (computed tomography) scanners. They set up the equipment, position patients, and take images. They typically work with physicians and other healthcare professionals to review and evaluate the images.

Typical entry-level education

Associate degree in radiography

Median annual salary, 2023:

$76,020

Projected employment, 2031

264,100

10 Occupational Therapy Assistant


What they do

Occupational therapy involves helping people who have been ill, injured, or have conditions such as Parkinson’s disease recover the physical skills needed for daily life. Occupational therapy assistants work with under the supervision of occupational therapists to help patients in a variety of ways. They assist them with exercises, teach them how to use special equipment, and record their progress. They might also collaborate with the therapist to develop and carry out treatment plans.  

Typical entry-level education

Associate degree from an accredited occupational therapy assistant program

Median annual salary, 2023:

$65,450

Projected employment, 2032

$49,000

Source: https://www.bls.gov/

Based on national data, not school-specific information. Conditions in your area may vary. Accessed 8/9/2023. 

 

10 Top In-Demand Careers Requiring an Associate Degree

 

Earning a high school diploma or GED is a great accomplishment—but now what? You may want to pursue further education to increase your career options, but might not want to commit to 4 more years to earn a bachelor’s degree. 

Pursuing an associate degree could be a great solution for you. You could typically complete a program in 2 years, and many jobs requiring an associate degree are in high demand. In this article, we explore the top 10 in-demand careers that require an associate degree and provide information about which industries these careers are in most demand. The rankings that follow are based on the number of projected jobs in 2031, not growth rate. See the infographic for information about the fastest-growing jobs that require an associate degree. 

Also make sure to check out our article “10 Top Top-Paying Careers Requiring an Associate Degree.”

Top 10 In-Demand Careers

1 Computer Support Specialist


Industries with the highest levels of employment in Computer Support Specialists, 2022:

IndustryEmploymentAnnual mean wage 
Computer Systems Design and Related Services 160,800$59,700
Employment Services43,800$55,230
Management of Companies and Enterprises38,150$62,970 
Elementary and Secondary Schools 35,360 $54,450
Software Publishers 29,570 $70,960 

What They Do:

Provide technical support to computer users; maintain networks

Employment, 2022

914,100

Projected employment, 2032

963,300

2 Preschool Teacher


Industries with the highest levels of employment in Preschool Teachers, 2022:

IndustryEmploymentAnnual mean wage 
Child Care Services 290,870$34,480
Elementary and Secondary Schools75,700$53,200
Individual and Family Services 12,530$39,470
Religious Organizations 7,240$40,960
Local Government, excluding schools and hospitals (OEWS Designation) 6,490$45,140

What they do:

Care for and teach basic skills to children who have not yet entered kindergarten

Employment, 2022

512,300

Projected employment, 2032

529,600

3Paralegal/Legal Assistant


Industries with the highest levels of employment in Paralegals and Legal Assistants, 2022:

IndustryEmploymentAnnual mean wage 
Legal Services 263,170$60,570 
Local Government, excluding schools and hospitals (OEWS Designation) 16,420$61,190 
Federal Executive Branch (OEWS Designation) 15,080 $76,310 
State Government, excluding schools and hospitals (OEWS Designation) 10,850 $52,900 
Management of Companies and Enterprises 6,890 $84,260 

What they do:

Assist lawyers in conducting research, writing drafts and reports, and maintaining files

Employment, 2022

354,300

Projected employment, 2032

369,100

4Radiologic and MRI Technologist


Industries with the highest levels of employment in Radiologic and MRI Technologists, Postsecondary, 2022:

IndustryEmploymentAnnual mean wage 
General Medical and Surgical Hospitals125,430 $71,260 
Offices of Physicians 40,390 $62,220 
Medical and Diagnostic Laboratories 16,060 $70,460 
Outpatient Care Centers 15,050 $81,530 
Federal Executive Branch (OEWS Designation) 5,980 $78,160 

What they do:

Perform diagnostic tests on patients with equipment such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanners; adjust and maintain equipment

Employment, 2022

264,100

Projected employment, 2031

279,600

5Dental Hygienist


Industries with the highest levels of employment of Dental Hygienists, 2022:

IndustryEmploymentAnnual mean wage 
Offices of Dentists 203,330$85,110
Employment Services 2,630$88,670
Offices of Physicians 2,080$77,070
Outpatient Care Centers 1,850$86,580
Federal Executive Branch (OEWS Designation) 870$69,450

What they do:

Clean and polish teeth, look for dental disease, educate patients about oral health

Employment, 2022

219,400

Projected employment, 2032

235,700

6Physical Therapist Assistant/Aide


Industries with the highest levels of employment in Physical Therapist Assistants and Aides, 2022:

IndustryEmploymentAnnual mean wage 
Offices of Other Health Practitioners 44,900 $59,970 
General Medical and Surgical Hospitals 17,640 $63,430 
Home Health Care Services 11,810 $78,360 
Nursing Care Facilities (Skilled Nursing Facilities) 8,950 $72,800 
Offices of Physicians 4,810 $59,310 

Typical entry-level education

Master’s degree in social work

Employment, 2022

145,100

Projected employment, 2032

172,700

7Diagnostic Medical Sonographer


Diagnostic Medical Sonographer

IndustryEmploymentAnnual mean wage 
General Medical and Surgical Hospitals 45,770 $84,340 
Offices of Physicians 20,220 $82,890 
Medical and Diagnostic Laboratories 8,510 $78,190 
Outpatient Care Centers 3,240 $113,680 
Employment Services 920 $79,550 

What they do:

Conduct tests and create images using sonography equipment

Employment, 2022

142,800

Projected employment, 2032

156,900

8Respiratory Therapist


Industries with the highest levels of employment in Respiratory Therapists, 2022:

IndustryEmploymentAnnual mean wage 
General Medical and Surgical Hospitals 97,800$74,240 
Specialty (except Psychiatric and Substance Abuse) Hospitals 7,720 $72,600 
Nursing Care Facilities (Skilled Nursing Facilities) 4,950 $69,770 
Employment Services 3,280 $108,330
Professional and Commercial Equipment and Supplies Merchant Wholesalers 2,490 $63,610 

What they do:

Master’s degree from a physician assistant program

Employment, 2022

133,100

Projected employment, 2032

149,800

9Electrical and Electronic Engineering Technologist/Technician


Industries with the highest levels of employment in Veterinary Technologists and Technicians, 2022:

IndustryEmploymentAnnual mean wage 
Veterinary and Photography Services 109,230 $40,300  
Colleges, Universities, and Professional Schools 2,850 $47,680 
Social Advocacy Organizations 2,200 $39,310 
Other Personal Services 1,560 $39,180 
Scientific Research and Development Services 740 $62,030 

What they do:

Aid veterinarians in conducting tests, examining, and caring for animals

Employment, 2022

122,900

Projected employment, 2032

148,100

10Medical Equipment Repairer


Industries with the highest levels of employment in Medical Equipment Repairers, 2022:

IndustryEmploymentAnnual mean wage 
Elementary and Secondary Schools24,070 $63,790 
Electronic and Precision Equipment Repair and Maintenance 10,770 $59,060 
General Medical and Surgical Hospitals 6,630 $71,320 
Rental and leasing services (5322, 5323, and 5324 only) 4,180 $43,500 
Outpatient Care Centers 3,600 $56,280 

What they do:

Repair and maintain medical equipment such as ventilators, anesthesia machines, electric wheelchairs, and hospital beds

Employment, 2022

66,400

Projected employment, 2032

75,100

 

Source: https://www.bls.gov/

Based on national data, not school-specific information. Conditions in your area may vary. Accessed 8/9/2023. 

10 Common Job Interview Questions and How to Answer Them

Nerves may hit along with the excitement when you reach the interview stage of an employment opportunity. Luckily, you could learn from those who’ve asked and answered before. Here, we provide you with a helpful guide for job interview preparation with these common job interview questions. We’ll explore questions job candidates often face, discuss why the interviewer might be asking the question, and provide tips on how to respond.

1. Tell Me A Bit About Yourself And Your Work Experience

This is the first in the list of common job interview questions. It’s common for an interviewer to start with a “non-question” like this. This question works a lot like an overarching personality test. Consider questions like this as an opportunity to highlight your special features that may not come through in the forthcoming standard interview questions.

Why Do Interviewers Ask This Question?

This question is a good way for both you and the interviewer to ease into the interview. But it’s also a way for the interviewer to assess your temperament, confidence, ability to communicate, and priorities.  

At base, interviewers are looking for a competent candidate with enthusiasm for the work who could play a functional role on their team. On a more general level, people spend a lot of their time in life at work. So, interviewers might also look for signs of a personality match with the current team and dynamic.

How To Respond to Common Job Interview Questions Like This?

Think of your response as a story, one that highlights your interests, background, and future goals. As with stories, it could be helpful to structure your response to help make it organized and concise and keep you on track. One possible structure is “past, present, future.” Begin by discussing how you became interested in the field, your past work experiences, and your achievements in those positions. Next, transition to your current situation, and then to your hopes for the future.

Make your response specific, and consider including a few details about hobbies and interests outside of work. This is a chance to let your personality shine!

2. Why Do You Want To Work At This Company In This position?

Take note that this is a two-part question. You’re being asked what appeals to you about this workplace as well as the job opening within it. It’s essentially one of the most common job interview questions about your motives.

Why Do Interviewers Ask This Question?

Potential employers want to hear about why you’re interviewing for this particular job in this particular company. It’s important to them that job candidates know what they’re signing up for when applying to work with them. This question helps them determine if that’s the case and reveals your level of interest in the company as well as your potential role.

How To Respond to Common Job Interview Questions Like This?

A good way to prepare for this question may be to ask yourself, Why this job and this company? Then, you could answer in a way that’s true to yourself and suited to the potential employer’s expectations. Consider checking the company website for their mission statement and look for goals that parallel your own purpose.  

Prepare with research and insights into what makes the company special and how you might fit in and make helpful contributions. Answer with passion—this is a perfect time to show your enthusiasm for the company. Showing excitement for the position and company could help you build rapport with the interviewer while also spotlighting yourself as a match.

3. How do you manage challenging situations at work? Please give an illustrative example from your last job

This common job interview question presents a dual challenge. That’s because an answer reveals how you see work challenges, based on the way you frame the situation in your story. Ideally, you give the interviewer a lens into how you could manage stressful situations in the workplace.

Why Do Interviewers Ask This Question?

Interviewers want to assess your adaptability for managing stress in different types of challenges. They want to know that you have a set of tools and techniques for handling difficult situations that allow for flexibility.

How To Respond to Common Job Interview Questions Like This?

Give a specific example of how you handled stress and pressure at work. Keep this story relevant to the position you’re interviewing about. Focus on your personal growth, the skills you used, and the lessons you learned to help make your story compelling while also highlighting your abilities.

4. When you have multiple projects at the same time, how do you stay organized and on time? What’s an example of this in action from the recent past?

Organization and timeliness may be key in the workplace no matter your role. Many people have trouble juggling more than one task at a time—you want to show that you have the tools and ability to do so.

Why is This one of the Most Common Interview Questions?

Interviewers want to see indicators that you know how to manage a workload, meet deadlines, and set priorities. They also want to see that you are able to communicate and collaborate, because these parts of staying organized and on time as part of a team.  

How To Respond to Common Job Interview Questions Like This?

There are many ways to stay organized and on time—which means there’s not a singular answer for this. So, when you prep your answer, think about specific ways you manage your time and the organizational practices you use.

Give an example from a typical workday that shows your time and organization systems in action along with how you share needs and expectations with your team. You might want to keep this answer especially succinct and organized—given the subject matter. For example, you might follow an outline of sorts by framing the answer with <em>First, second, then, and last.</em> It may serve you to also account for unexpected changes and show some flexibility in your system so that you don’t appear overly rigid.

Many employers utilize systems and apps to help employees stay on track. So, if you’ve used them, it may serve you to mention this experience and talk about how it helped your process.

5. What can you tell me about a time when you made a mistake at work? What happened, and how did you handle the situation from start to finish?

We all make mistakes, and the way we handle them could reveal a lot about what we’re like at work. For instance, if a candidate won’t admit they’ve made mistakes, it might show they aren’t great at accountability.

Why Do Interviewers Ask This Question?

This question presents a great litmus test for a candidate’s personality and temperament. For instance, if you answer the question with a harsh indictment of your mistake, you might be seen as being too harsh on yourself and perhaps others as well. Your answer could also show the interviewer how well you communicate and your teamwork style.

Interviewers want to know that you have the initiative to find solutions and ask for help. Even if the mistake was a mere misunderstanding, reaching out and asking for clarity could show that you are able to take action to fix matters.

How To Respond to Common Job Interview Questions Like This?

This question invites an example. So, give a specific instance of a minor mistake you’ve made and how you managed the situation. One way to use this question to your advantage could be to highlight positive qualities you may have used to solve it, such as communication and teamwork. You could also wrap up your answer with what you learned and how you use that lesson now to avoid making the same mistake again.


Check out the infographic below to learn more.

Common Job Interview Questions

6. Where do you see your career in 3 to 5 years?

Interviewers pose this standard question even if they don’t expect candidates to know where their career might be in the future. Mostly, it’s about checking where your head is career-wise. Are you thinking about where you’re going, how you’re doing, and what it means to you?  They’re looking for a motivated and productive mindset.

Why Do Interviewers Ask This Question?

Typically, the main objective of this question is to learn about how much you care about your career path. Interviewers are checking for short- and long-term goals. But they may not consider the actual goals as important as the fact that you have some. So, it’s not critical that your plans perfectly align with where you may wind up. Just have some goals. It shows you’re thinking about it.

How To Respond to Common Job Interview Questions Like This?

This question calls out for preparation. You may want to work toward aligning your goals with a career trajectory that follows naturally from the position they’re filling. Be enthusiastic about your goals and the possibilities for your career. Show your ambition, but be realistic—keep your goals achievable within the time frame.

7. Why did you leave your last job?

This question gives you a chance to highlight your ambitions and hopes to meet new challenges. It’s also an opportunity for you to ask why the position you’re applying for is open now. That could yield insight into what might lie ahead if you land the job.  

Why Do Interviewers Ask This Question?

Potential employers typically want to know several things: 1. Whether you were fired and, if so, why; 2. If you’re someone who has trouble staying interested in work and moves around a lot; 3. If any issues with your last job might also be issues in the position you are applying for.

How To Respond to Common Job Interview Questions Like This?

Interviewers want a clear and honest answer; simple works fine here. But it’s also important to keep your story as positive as possible. No matter how you may feel about your former or current job, there’s a bright side to every story, and this is a great place to shine a light on it.

You could talk about wanting to learn from a new environment and make a more significant contribution at a company that’s better suited to you. Your response could open a channel to talk about how this company and position could be one that you are excited to commit to.

8. What would you change about your current place of work if you could?

This question may be a little tricky. On the one hand, you don’t want to sound like you are bad-mouthing your current company. On the other hand, you want to focus on an issue that is significant and warrants changing.

Why Do Interviewers Ask This Question?

The interviewer wants a clear answer that tells them a concise story about a problem and solution relevant to their business and your potential role. This could help them understand how you might suit the position and fit into the company culture. It also puts your ambition level on display based on how big a change you’d like to make. Do you want to change a company fundamental? Or the kind of coffee in the break room?

How To Respond to Common Job Interview Questions Like This?

Among the many ways to answer this question, one key element crosses through all of them. Try to keep the topic to something you’re capable of changing. It grounds your proposal in a possible reality. Also, be specific. For example, you might talk about ways to open channels of communication such as creating a system for answering emails in a timely way or filtering irrelevant emails from the team inbox.

9. What’s your greatest achievement—the one about which you’re most proud?

It’s your time to shine. This question opens the floor for you to spotlight accomplishments. We’re all proud of something we’ve done. These achievements say a lot about us and may show not only how we see ourselves but also what we think matters most about our work.

Why Do Interviewers Ask This Question?

Interviewers are likely hoping for a relevant answer that suits the open position they’re attempting to fill. That could mean several things, from skills and experience to attitude and value alignment. So, stay relevant to the position you’re seeking, and talk about a measurable success.

They might also be looking for how you measure success at work. For example, if you see your greatest achievement as the blowout office parties you plan, you may not measure success in alignment with your interviewer.  

How To Respond to Common Job Interview Questions Like This?

This question highlights what you value most about yourself. For example, sharing a parenting story about overcoming a challenge with your kids might point to family values. That may align with the interviewer’s interest in you as a candidate. Perhaps they’ve been tasked with finding candidates who share the core values of their family values company. Answer this question honestly. Having a job that fits your values could increase the chances that you’ll be more invested at work.

10. What didn’t I ask you but should have?

This question could serve as an opportunity to fill gaps that may be left about your experience or skills. It’s also a chance to give the interviewer a more rounded perspective of you.

Why Do Interviewers Ask This Question?

This question may enable the interviewer to see how interested you are, how much you’ve been paying attention, and learn more about you. It’s also a low effort way for them to do all of this with a single question.

How To Respond to Common Job Interview Questions Like This?

Answering this question well could serve as a chance to spotlight listening skills and insight. Prepared candidates could also use this opportunity to talk about unmentioned strengths. Key to this question could be an alignment with the way the interviewer has set the stage. You’ve been answering their questions and gained familiarity with their priorities and interview style. Keep these aspects in mind.  

 

What Students Are Saying About Online Education

Online education or online learning has gotten its share of bad press, particularly before it became a necessity due to COVID-19. There was skepticism and mistrust about the quality of online courses. People wondered, Are online colleges legit? Is it possible to find a good online school? Online learning was sometimes seen as a less rigorous, less interactive, and less credible alternative to traditional classroom settings.

However, the COVID-19 pandemic forced an unprecedented shift to online learning for many educational institutions, and the numbers of online students increased significantly. Before COVID, in 2019, 37% of undergraduate and graduate students were enrolled in online college courses.1 In 2020, during the peak of COVID, the percentage jumped to 74%.2 Although the percentage decreased to 60% in 2021,2 it is still significant compared to pre-COVID numbers.

Does this increase in online students indicate a change in perception of the quality and desirability of online education? Aslanian Market Research, part of EducationDynamics (EdDY), has been conducting surveys of online students for a number of years in order to examine trends in the scope and perceptions of online education. Their results provide a window into what online college students are saying about this form of study.

Benefits of Online Education

Apparently, students have a lot of good things to say about online education!

Online study is worth the cost

Agree or strongly agree: 87%

Cost is typically a major consideration for students embarking on postsecondary education. They worry not only about the affordability of college, but also whether their expenditure will be worth it in the end.

In 2022, a whopping 87% of online students reported that their online education was worth the cost. This number has grown significantly over the years: In 2017, only 71% of online students agreed or strongly agreed that online education was worth the cost. In 2021, this number jumped to 74%, and in 2022, it reached 87%. This trend could indicate a positive shift in student perceptions of online learning.

Online study allows me to complete my studies faster

Agree: 86%

Online learning offers a unique advantage for students looking to expedite their studies and finish their programs faster. With the flexibility and accessibility that online platforms provide, students could have the freedom to create their own schedules and learn at their own pace, allowing them to optimize their time and focus on their coursework efficiently. Because online college classes can typically be taken at any time, students don’t have to worry about scheduling conflicts and might thus be able to fit in more courses in a shorter timeframe.

Additionally, online learning eliminates the need for commuting to a physical campus, saving time and energy.

My personal productivity is improved by studying online

Agree: 85%

The flexibility of online study gives students the freedom to choose when and where they study, which could allow for better alignment with their peak productivity hours. Moreover, online courses often provide resources such as recorded lectures, notes, and study materials, which could be revisited at any time for review and reinforcement, helping students achieve their educational goals more efficiently.

Online study might also result in fewer distractions—provided students create dedicated study spaces at home that are free from clutter and noise, and away from distractions such as social media or television—which means they could concentrate better and potentially achieve higher levels of productivity. And being able to take breaks as needed rather than at specified times could help reduce burnout and improve focus.

Online study made me more motivated to complete my studies

Agree: 84%

Motivation is an important component of achievement—without the drive to reach a particular goal, it could be very difficult to accomplish it. Online learning requires students to create their own schedule and stay on top of their studies—thus, students take ownership of their learning journey, which could make them more vested in seeing it through.

In addition, the majority of online students cited career-related factors, such as earning more money or getting a promotion, as their primary objective for pursuing an online degree. Students who have a specific objective focused on their career could be more motivated to complete their studies than those who haven’t identified any targeted goals for attending college.

I was able to easily navigate the technology and learning management system for my classes

Agree: 84%

With online education, being able to successfully interact with technology is particularly important, since it is the primary avenue for instruction. Apparently, the majority of online students have been able to rise to the challenge!

My teachers were prepared to teach online

Agree: 83%

The transition to online instruction posed significant challenges for many teachers in various aspects. Firstly, adapting to the technological tools and platforms required a steep learning curve for many educators. They had to quickly familiarize themselves with new software, video conferencing platforms, and online learning management systems, often with limited training and support.

Additionally, the shift from in-person to online instruction changed the dynamics of classroom management and student engagement. Teachers had to find innovative ways to recreate interactive learning experiences, foster meaningful discussions, and maintain student participation remotely.

Despite these difficulties, teachers have demonstrated remarkable resilience and adaptability, utilizing technology and pedagogical strategies to ensure effective online instruction and support their students’ learning journeys. And it seems that online students are happy with the results!

I had a connection to my teachers during my online study

Agree: 78%

I had a connection to my classmates during my online study

Agree: 72%

An early concern about online education was that it would be less interactive than traditional in-class education and make students feel isolated from their teachers and classmates. However, based on the EdDY study, this appears not to be the case for the majority of students.

Online colleges have had to transform the traditional classroom setting in order to provide opportunities for students to connect with their teachers and classmates. By leveraging technology, online programs offer students a range of virtual platforms to engage with instructors and peers, build relationships, and foster a sense of community. Through live virtual lectures or video conferencing, students could interact with their instructors in real time, ask questions, and receive personalized feedback. Additionally, virtual office hours and online chat rooms could allow students to engage more intimately with their instructors, creating a conducive environment for sharing insights, gaining clarification, and receiving academic support.

Students can also check available online graduate programs if looking for an opportunity to pursue graduate school online.


Check out the infographic below to learn more.

What Students Are Saying About Online Education

Want to use this Benefits of Online Education infographic on your site? Just use the code below!

Suggestions For Improvement

How could online education be improved? Students from the survey had several thoughts about that.

Online programs should include an introductory course about “how to study online” or workshops to prepare students for online study

Agree: 85%

While the majority of students agreed that they were able to easily navigate the technology in their online program, there is more to online education than the technology. Students who have never taken courses online might wonder, What is online college like? How do online colleges work? An orientation course could go a long way in helping students know what to expect and feel more comfortable as they begin their online education journey.

Online programs should include “cohorts” of students who have the same career goals in order to build relationships

Agree: 82%

The EdDY survey reports that the majority of students felt a connection with their peers, but it doesn’t reveal the extent or nature of these connections—in particular, whether students were able to build networking relationships within their field of study. Networking is considered by many to be an important component of finding a job and enhancing one’s career, and thus it should be a priority for online programs to find ways to help students create these types of connections.

Online courses should include virtual field trips and/or simulations

Agree: 76%

Ah, the school field trip! Many of us may have fond memories of the field trips taken throughout our years of primary and secondary education—and apparently online students are looking to recreate those experiences as well.

10 Top In-Demand Careers Requiring a Master’s Degree

 

Earning a master’s degree may become increasingly important for professionals looking to remain competitive and move up in their careers. Some industries require a master’s as a typical prerequisite for certain positions. This trend may be driven by the need for individuals to acquire targeted skills and knowledge, as well as the growing complexity of various industries.

In-Demand Careers Requiring a Master’s Degree  Master’s Degree Fast Facts
Typical time to complete: Usually or 1 or 2 years of full-time academic study beyond a bachelor’s degree  Formats: Online, hybrid, on-campus  Fastest-Growing Occupations Requiring a Master’s Degree, 2021:  Nurse practitioners 
46%  Statisticians
31%  Physician assistant
28%  Epidemiologist
26%  TIE: Speech-language pathologist
Computer and information research scientist
21%

The good news is that many jobs requiring a master’s are in high demand. In this article, we explore the top 10 in-demand careers that require a master’s degree and provide information about which industries these careers are in most demand. The rankings that follow are based on the number of projected jobs in 2032, not growth rate. See the infographic for information about the fastest-growing jobs that require a master’s degree.

Also make sure to check out our article 10 Top-Paying Careers Requiring a Master’s Degree.”

Top 10 In-Demand Careers

1 Computer Support Specialist


Industries with the highest levels of employment in Computer Support Specialists, 2022:

IndustryEmploymentAnnual mean wage 
Computer Systems Design and Related Services 160,800$59,700
Employment Services43,800$55,230
Management of Companies and Enterprises38,150$62,970 
Elementary and Secondary Schools 35,360 $54,450
Software Publishers 29,570 $70,960 

What They Do:

Provide technical support to computer users; maintain networks

Employment, 2022

914,100

Projected employment, 2032

963,300

2 Preschool Teacher


Industries with the highest levels of employment in Preschool Teachers, 2022:

IndustryEmploymentAnnual mean wage 
Child Care Services 290,870$34,480
Elementary and Secondary Schools75,700$53,200
Individual and Family Services 12,530$39,470
Religious Organizations 7,240$40,960
Local Government, excluding schools and hospitals (OEWS Designation) 6,490$45,140

What they do:

Care for and teach basic skills to children who have not yet entered kindergarten

Employment, 2022

512,300

Projected employment, 2032

529,600

3Paralegal/Legal Assistant


Industries with the highest levels of employment in Paralegals and Legal Assistants, 2022:

IndustryEmploymentAnnual mean wage 
Legal Services 263,170$60,570 
Local Government, excluding schools and hospitals (OEWS Designation) 16,420$61,190 
Federal Executive Branch (OEWS Designation) 15,080 $76,310 
State Government, excluding schools and hospitals (OEWS Designation) 10,850 $52,900 
Management of Companies and Enterprises 6,890 $84,260 

What they do:

Assist lawyers in conducting research, writing drafts and reports, and maintaining files

Employment, 2022

354,300

Projected employment, 2032

369,100

4Radiologic and MRI Technologist


Industries with the highest levels of employment in Radiologic and MRI Technologists, Postsecondary, 2022:

IndustryEmploymentAnnual mean wage 
General Medical and Surgical Hospitals125,430 $71,260 
Offices of Physicians 40,390 $62,220 
Medical and Diagnostic Laboratories 16,060 $70,460 
Outpatient Care Centers 15,050 $81,530 
Federal Executive Branch (OEWS Designation) 5,980 $78,160 

What they do:

Perform diagnostic tests on patients with equipment such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanners; adjust and maintain equipment

Employment, 2022

264,100

Projected employment, 2031

279,600

5Dental Hygienist


Industries with the highest levels of employment of Dental Hygienists, 2022:

IndustryEmploymentAnnual mean wage 
Offices of Dentists 203,330$85,110
Employment Services 2,630$88,670
Offices of Physicians 2,080$77,070
Outpatient Care Centers 1,850$86,580
Federal Executive Branch (OEWS Designation) 870$69,450

What they do:

Clean and polish teeth, look for dental disease, educate patients about oral health

Employment, 2022

219,400

Projected employment, 2032

235,700

6Physical Therapist Assistant/Aide


Industries with the highest levels of employment in Physical Therapist Assistants and Aides, 2022:

IndustryEmploymentAnnual mean wage 
Offices of Other Health Practitioners 44,900 $59,970 
General Medical and Surgical Hospitals 17,640 $63,430 
Home Health Care Services 11,810 $78,360 
Nursing Care Facilities (Skilled Nursing Facilities) 8,950 $72,800 
Offices of Physicians 4,810 $59,310 

Typical entry-level education

Master’s degree in social work

Employment, 2022

145,100

Projected employment, 2032

172,700

7Diagnostic Medical Sonographer


Diagnostic Medical Sonographer

IndustryEmploymentAnnual mean wage 
General Medical and Surgical Hospitals 45,770 $84,340 
Offices of Physicians 20,220 $82,890 
Medical and Diagnostic Laboratories 8,510 $78,190 
Outpatient Care Centers 3,240 $113,680 
Employment Services 920 $79,550 

What they do:

Conduct tests and create images using sonography equipment

Employment, 2022

142,800

Projected employment, 2032

156,900

8Respiratory Therapist


Industries with the highest levels of employment in Respiratory Therapists, 2022:

IndustryEmploymentAnnual mean wage 
General Medical and Surgical Hospitals 97,800$74,240 
Specialty (except Psychiatric and Substance Abuse) Hospitals 7,720 $72,600 
Nursing Care Facilities (Skilled Nursing Facilities) 4,950 $69,770 
Employment Services 3,280 $108,330
Professional and Commercial Equipment and Supplies Merchant Wholesalers 2,490 $63,610 

What they do:

Master’s degree from a physician assistant program

Employment, 2022

133,100

Projected employment, 2032

149,800

9Electrical and Electronic Engineering Technologist/Technician


Industries with the highest levels of employment in Veterinary Technologists and Technicians, 2022:

IndustryEmploymentAnnual mean wage 
Veterinary and Photography Services 109,230 $40,300  
Colleges, Universities, and Professional Schools 2,850 $47,680 
Social Advocacy Organizations 2,200 $39,310 
Other Personal Services 1,560 $39,180 
Scientific Research and Development Services 740 $62,030 

What they do:

Aid veterinarians in conducting tests, examining, and caring for animals

Employment, 2022

122,900

Projected employment, 2032

148,100

10Medical Equipment Repairer


Industries with the highest levels of employment in Medical Equipment Repairers, 2022:

IndustryEmploymentAnnual mean wage 
Elementary and Secondary Schools24,070 $63,790 
Electronic and Precision Equipment Repair and Maintenance 10,770 $59,060 
General Medical and Surgical Hospitals 6,630 $71,320 
Rental and leasing services (5322, 5323, and 5324 only) 4,180 $43,500 
Outpatient Care Centers 3,600 $56,280 

What they do:

Repair and maintain medical equipment such as ventilators, anesthesia machines, electric wheelchairs, and hospital beds

Employment, 2022

66,400

Projected employment, 2032

75,100

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Source: https://www.bls.gov/

Based on national data, not school-specific information. Conditions in your area may vary. Accessed 8/9/2023. 

10 Top-Paying Careers Requiring a Master’s Degree

 

There are many reasons to pursue a master’s degree: to enhance your career, open the door to new opportunities, gain a competitive edge in the job market, build a professional network, and expand your skill set. These may be reasons enough for you to invest in earning a master’s degree, but one other benefit might help you solidify your decision: increased earning potential. The Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) reported that in 2021, the median annual salary for those who hold a master’s degree was $26,884 more than that of the average of all workers.1 In addition, many jobs that require a master’s degree command higher pay than those that don’t: nearly half of the occupations listed by the BLS as requiring a master’s have salaries of $80,000 or more. 

Top-Paying Careers Requiring a Master’s Degree  Typical time to complete: Usually or 1 or 2 years of full-time academic study beyond a bachelor’s degree  Formats: Online, hybrid, on-campus   Most common master’s degrees earned, 2021:  
Business: 202,334 
Education: 153,756 
Health professions and related programs: 142,025 
Computer and information sciences and support services: 54,174 
Public administration and social services: 49,388

In this article, we list 10 top-paying careers that typically require a master’s degree at the entry level, as specified by the BLS. Note that there are a number of careers—some that are often higher-paying than those listed here—that may not require a master’s, but for which a master’s degree might be preferred. This could be especially true for those who have earned an MBA or master’s in a business-related field. Refer to the “How to Become One” tab on the BLS site to learn more about the requirements for a particular career. 

Also make sure to check out our article 10 Top In-Demand Careers Requiring a Master’s Degree.”

1 Computer Support Specialist


Industries with the highest levels of employment in Computer Support Specialists, 2022:

IndustryEmploymentAnnual mean wage 
Computer Systems Design and Related Services 160,800$59,700
Employment Services43,800$55,230
Management of Companies and Enterprises38,150$62,970 
Elementary and Secondary Schools 35,360 $54,450
Software Publishers 29,570 $70,960 

What They Do:

Provide technical support to computer users; maintain networks

Employment, 2022

914,100

Projected employment, 2032

963,300

2 Preschool Teacher


Industries with the highest levels of employment in Preschool Teachers, 2022:

IndustryEmploymentAnnual mean wage 
Child Care Services 290,870$34,480
Elementary and Secondary Schools75,700$53,200
Individual and Family Services 12,530$39,470
Religious Organizations 7,240$40,960
Local Government, excluding schools and hospitals (OEWS Designation) 6,490$45,140

What they do:

Care for and teach basic skills to children who have not yet entered kindergarten

Employment, 2022

512,300

Projected employment, 2032

529,600

3Paralegal/Legal Assistant


Industries with the highest levels of employment in Paralegals and Legal Assistants, 2022:

IndustryEmploymentAnnual mean wage 
Legal Services 263,170$60,570 
Local Government, excluding schools and hospitals (OEWS Designation) 16,420$61,190 
Federal Executive Branch (OEWS Designation) 15,080 $76,310 
State Government, excluding schools and hospitals (OEWS Designation) 10,850 $52,900 
Management of Companies and Enterprises 6,890 $84,260 

What they do:

Assist lawyers in conducting research, writing drafts and reports, and maintaining files

Employment, 2022

354,300

Projected employment, 2032

369,100

4Radiologic and MRI Technologist


Industries with the highest levels of employment in Radiologic and MRI Technologists, Postsecondary, 2022:

IndustryEmploymentAnnual mean wage 
General Medical and Surgical Hospitals125,430 $71,260 
Offices of Physicians 40,390 $62,220 
Medical and Diagnostic Laboratories 16,060 $70,460 
Outpatient Care Centers 15,050 $81,530 
Federal Executive Branch (OEWS Designation) 5,980 $78,160 

What they do:

Perform diagnostic tests on patients with equipment such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanners; adjust and maintain equipment

Employment, 2022

264,100

Projected employment, 2031

279,600

5Dental Hygienist


Industries with the highest levels of employment of Dental Hygienists, 2022:

IndustryEmploymentAnnual mean wage 
Offices of Dentists 203,330$85,110
Employment Services 2,630$88,670
Offices of Physicians 2,080$77,070
Outpatient Care Centers 1,850$86,580
Federal Executive Branch (OEWS Designation) 870$69,450

What they do:

Clean and polish teeth, look for dental disease, educate patients about oral health

Employment, 2022

219,400

Projected employment, 2032

235,700

6Physical Therapist Assistant/Aide


Industries with the highest levels of employment in Physical Therapist Assistants and Aides, 2022:

IndustryEmploymentAnnual mean wage 
Offices of Other Health Practitioners 44,900 $59,970 
General Medical and Surgical Hospitals 17,640 $63,430 
Home Health Care Services 11,810 $78,360 
Nursing Care Facilities (Skilled Nursing Facilities) 8,950 $72,800 
Offices of Physicians 4,810 $59,310 

Typical entry-level education

Master’s degree in social work

Employment, 2022

145,100

Projected employment, 2032

172,700

7Diagnostic Medical Sonographer


Diagnostic Medical Sonographer

IndustryEmploymentAnnual mean wage 
General Medical and Surgical Hospitals 45,770 $84,340 
Offices of Physicians 20,220 $82,890 
Medical and Diagnostic Laboratories 8,510 $78,190 
Outpatient Care Centers 3,240 $113,680 
Employment Services 920 $79,550 

What they do:

Conduct tests and create images using sonography equipment

Employment, 2022

142,800

Projected employment, 2032

156,900

8Respiratory Therapist


Industries with the highest levels of employment in Respiratory Therapists, 2022:

IndustryEmploymentAnnual mean wage 
General Medical and Surgical Hospitals 97,800$74,240 
Specialty (except Psychiatric and Substance Abuse) Hospitals 7,720 $72,600 
Nursing Care Facilities (Skilled Nursing Facilities) 4,950 $69,770 
Employment Services 3,280 $108,330
Professional and Commercial Equipment and Supplies Merchant Wholesalers 2,490 $63,610 

What they do:

Master’s degree from a physician assistant program

Employment, 2022

133,100

Projected employment, 2032

149,800

9Electrical and Electronic Engineering Technologist/Technician


Industries with the highest levels of employment in Veterinary Technologists and Technicians, 2022:

IndustryEmploymentAnnual mean wage 
Veterinary and Photography Services 109,230 $40,300  
Colleges, Universities, and Professional Schools 2,850 $47,680 
Social Advocacy Organizations 2,200 $39,310 
Other Personal Services 1,560 $39,180 
Scientific Research and Development Services 740 $62,030 

What they do:

Aid veterinarians in conducting tests, examining, and caring for animals

Employment, 2022

122,900

Projected employment, 2032

148,100

10Medical Equipment Repairer


Industries with the highest levels of employment in Medical Equipment Repairers, 2022:

IndustryEmploymentAnnual mean wage 
Elementary and Secondary Schools24,070 $63,790 
Electronic and Precision Equipment Repair and Maintenance 10,770 $59,060 
General Medical and Surgical Hospitals 6,630 $71,320 
Rental and leasing services (5322, 5323, and 5324 only) 4,180 $43,500 
Outpatient Care Centers 3,600 $56,280 

What they do:

Repair and maintain medical equipment such as ventilators, anesthesia machines, electric wheelchairs, and hospital beds

Employment, 2022

66,400

Projected employment, 2032

75,100

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Source: https://www.bls.gov/

Based on national data, not school-specific information. Conditions in your area may vary. Accessed 8/9/2023. 

 

Colleges That Don’t Require a High School Diploma or GED

If you are one of the many students who want to go to college but don’t have a high school diploma or GED, you might feel as though your options are limited. However, some community colleges accept students without a high school diploma or GED, and some universities do as well. For those seeking vocational education, there are also trade schools that don’t require a high school diploma or GED.

This article provides you with information about how you might be able to attend college without a high school diploma or GED. 

Find an Online Degree Program

 

What Is a GED? 

You might have heard this term but wondered what it means—and what it might mean for you.

A GED, which stands for General Educational Development, is a credential that signifies the equivalent of a high school diploma in the United States and Canada. It is designed for individuals who did not complete their formal high school education but still wish to obtain a recognized qualification.

To earn a GED diploma, you must pass a test to show that you are proficient in the fundamental subject areas that students study in high school—math, science, social studies, and language arts. To prepare for the test, you could use study guides that are widely available or enroll in a GED program.

There are a number of GED programs available to help prepare you for the GED test. You can often take GED classes online, and you might even find free online GED courses. These programs typically last about 3 months, but the length may vary depending on your current proficiency in the areas covered on the test.

What’s the difference between a GED and a high school diploma?

  • Educational requirements: High schools often have specific coursework requirements that students must fulfill to graduate. Earning a GED diploma required only that you are able to pass the GED test.
  • Testing requirements: High school students often need to earn a particular grade to pass each course they take but are typically not necessarily required to take a single, comprehensive test to graduate. GED students must take one comprehensive test that consists of four parts, each focusing on a different area: mathematical reasoning, science, language arts, and social studies. Earning a diploma is contingent on passing the test.
  • Time: Earning a high school diploma typically takes 3-4 years. Earning a GED could take the amount of time you need to complete the exam if you are already proficient in the subject areas covered. If not, you might spend about 3 months preparing for the test.

However, there are also similarities between a GED and high school diploma. You could take both GED and high school courses online. Both require you to be knowledgeable in a range of subject areas. And both might lead to greater career opportunities.

Colleges That Don't Require a High School Diploma & The difference between a GED and a High School diploma Table

Can You Go to College Online without a GED or High School Diploma? 

There may be options for you if you do not have a GED or high school diploma. Here are some possibilities:

  • Apply as a non-traditional student. This option may be available at colleges that accept students without a GED or high school diploma. A non-traditional student is considered any adult who has not been enrolled in high school for more than 6 years. If you apply as a non-traditional student, you may have to submit other materials, such as letters of recommendation, test scores, and a personal statement.
  • Enroll in a community college. Some community colleges accept students without a high school diploma or GED. You could take individual courses relevant to the career you wish to pursue or even complete your degree program. Many community colleges offer online classes. After completing courses or earning a degree at a community college,you may be able to use your academic records to transfer to a four-year college or university.
  • Enroll as a lifelong student. A lifelong student is defined as a person who takes an individual class during a semester without the goal of earning a degree. Doing so might help you build skills and gain knowledge that could help you reach your career goals. 
  • Consider finishing high school while taking college classes online. There are some colleges that allow students to earn their diploma while beginning their college career. 

If I Don’t Have a GED or High School Diploma, What Are College Admission Requirements?

The admission requirements will generally vary based on the school. Requirements might include:

  • Meeting a minimum age requirement. Students typically have to be at least 18 years old. Some may be able to enroll at 16 years old if they also work toward earning their GED.
  • Ability to enroll in remedial courses. These classes help students catch up on missed information. 
  • Providing proof of academic accomplishments. Students may submit reading lists or alternative education program results. 
  • Submitting a personal statement. This essay allows students to provide more information about their background and experience.
  • Submitting standardized test scores. Adult students without a GED or high school diploma could take the SAT or ACT tests. 

Am I Eligible for Financial Aid if I Don’t Have a GED or High School Diploma?

Many federal student loans are only available to students with a high school diploma or GED. However, there is a federal program called “Ability to Benefit” that could help you out.

What is this program all about? According to the U.S. Department of Education, Ability to Benefit is an educational law. It was amended in 2015 and now allows for qualifying students without a high school diploma or GED to be eligible for Title IV funding. The law was amended in order to help more students enroll in college.

The eligibility requirements typically include:  

  • Being enrolled in a program that receives Title IV funding. These are typically career pathways programs.
  • Passing the Ability to Benefit exam.  
  • Completing six credits that could be applied toward a degree program. 

Students without a diploma or GED may also have additional options for financial aid. If you do not have a GED or high school diploma, you may want to reach out to local non-profit organizations and private companies that offer scholarships to qualifying applicants.

Colleges That Don’t Require a GED or High School Diploma?

There are colleges and universities across the country that do not require a GED or high school diploma. Here are some of them.

 

 

1University of California
Visit UOC


The University of California, with multiple campuses across the state, welcomes students even if they don’t possess a high school diploma or GED. For those without a GED or diploma, successfully passing the California High School Proficiency Examination is a prerequisite, alongside fulfilling all other admission requirements.

Tuition & Fees

Undergrad: $44,467

Financial Aid

Grants & Awards
55% Get, Avg. Amt. $21,669

Grad Rate

94%

 

2 Southern Technical College
Visit School


Southern Technical College, situated in Florida, provides a Career Pathways Program for students who do not have a high school diploma or GED. To qualify, students need to successfully pass the Ability to Benefit exam, participate in a GED preparation course, and enroll in career training classes.

Tuition & Fees

Undergrad: $18,250

Financial Aid

Grants & Awards
85% Get, Avg. Amt. $4,105

Grad Rate

57%

 

3 Columbia-Green Community College
Visit School


Located in Hudson, New York, Columbia-Greene Community College has the potential to admit students without a high school diploma or GED. Prospective students should meet specific admission criteria, including being at least 17 years old and completing a placement exam. Additionally, students may need to consult with a counselor to gain insights into any additional requirements.

Tuition & Fees

Undergrad $10,872

Financial Aid

Grants & Awards
70% Get, Avg. Amt. $8,791

Grad Rate

35%

 

 

4 Community College of Baltimore County
Visit CCBC


Based in Baltimore, Maryland, the Community College of Baltimore County provides an opportunity for students without a high school diploma or GED to gain admission. To qualify, students are required to either pass an entrance exam or commit to completing their GED while actively enrolled at the college.

Tuition & Fees

Undergrad: $7,474

Financial Aid

Grants & Awards
65% Get, Avg. Amt. $5,987

Grad Rate

18%

 

5 St. Charles Community College
Visit School


St. Charles Community College, situated in Missouri, offers admission opportunities to students without a high school diploma or GED. Eligibility for the Ability to Benefit program is a key factor for admission. To apply, students need to complete an application and undergo an academic skills assessment.

Tuition & Fees

Undergrad: $4,344

Financial Aid

Grants & Awards
75% Get, Avg. Amt. $10,087

Grad Rate

23%

 

6 University of Hawaii Community Colleges
Visit School


The University of Hawaii Community Colleges has a unique approach, as it doesn’t mandate a high school diploma or GED for enrollment. However, aspiring students must meet a minimum age requirement of at least 18 years old.

Tuition & Fees

Undergrad: $3,284

Financial Aid

Grants & Awards
100% Get, Avg. Amt. $3,852

Grad Rate

16%

 

7 Wayne County Community College District
Visit WCCCD


Wayne County Community College, situated in Detroit, Michigan, stands out with its adult education program. This initiative welcomes applications from students without a high school diploma or GED. To be eligible, individuals must be at least 18 years old.

Tuition & Fees

Undergrad: $3,263

Financial Aid

Grants & Awards
85% Get, Avg. Amt. $7,094

Grad Rate

14%

 

8 Union County College
Visit UCC


Union County College, located in Cranford, New Jersey, offers opportunities for students without a high school diploma or GED to enroll. It’s important to note that individuals who pass an Ability to Benefit test may not qualify for financial aid at this institution. Prospective students lacking a GED or high school diploma must be at least 18 years old to enroll in classes at Union County College

Tuition & Fees

Undergrad: $10,562

Financial Aid

Grants & Awards
82% Get, Avg. Amt. $7,285

Grad Rate

26%

 

9 Central Community College
Visit School


Central Community College is a Nebraska community college that may accept students who do not have a high school diploma or GED. Students who do not have a diploma or GED are eligible to apply as long as they are 18 years old. Students who are 16 years old may apply and work toward their GED at the same time. However, students without a diploma or GED may not be eligible for financial aid.

Tuition & Fees

Undergrad: $3,300

Financial Aid

Grants & Awards
99% Get, Avg. Amt. $6,109

Grad Rate

52%

 

10 Lawson State Community College 
Visit School


Lawson State Community College is located in Alabama. This community college allow students without a high school diploma or GED to apply. Students without a high school diploma or GED must take the Ability to Benefit assessment. Once the student passes the assessment, they work with a school counselor to continue the application process.

Tuition & Fees

Undergrad: $4,920

Financial Aid

Grants & Awards
100% Get, Avg. Amt. $9,764

Grad Rate

21%

 

11 Community College of Denver
Visit CCD


Community of College of Denver may accept students without a high school diploma or GED. This community college is located in Denver, Colorado. Students without a high school diploma or GED could apply if they qualify for Ability to Benefit. Students who pass the assessment also may be eligible for financial aid.

Tuition & Fees

Undergrad: $4,586

Financial Aid

Grants & Awards
77% Get, Avg. Amt. $8,510

Grad Rate

15%

 

12 Westchester Community College
Visit School


Westchester Community College is an extension of the State University of New York. This community college is located in Valhalla, New York. Students who do not have a high school diploma or GED may apply to this school. The admission requirements include passing the Ability to Benefit assessment.

Tuition & Fees

Undergrad: $5,410

Financial Aid

Grants & Awards
67% Get, Avg. Amt. $8,628

Grad Rate

27%

 

 

Note that this is not a complete list—there may be other schools that will accept you if you don’t have a high school or GED diploma.  

Now that you know you have options, why not take the next step toward getting an education? To learn more about colleges and universities that don’t require a high school or GED diploma, contact us today!

FAQs

1. Are there colleges that accept students without a high school diploma or GED? Yes, some community colleges and universities accept students without a high school diploma or GED. Additionally, trade schools that offer vocational education may also admit students without these credentials.

2. What is a GED and how can I obtain it?

A GED (General Educational Development) is a credential that signifies the equivalent of a high school diploma. It is designed for individuals who did not complete their formal high school education but wish to obtain a recognized qualification.

3.  How can I earn my GED diploma?
To earn a GED diploma, you must pass a test that assesses your proficiency in math, science, social studies, and language arts.

4. What is the difference between a GED and a high school diploma?
The main differences include educational requirements, testing requirements, and the time it takes to earn the credentials. High school diplomas often have specific coursework requirements, while a GED only requires passing the GED test. High school students typically need to pass individual courses, while GED students must pass one comprehensive test. Earning a high school diploma usually takes 3-4 years, whereas the time to prepare for and complete the GED test may vary but could be around 3 months.

5. Can you attend college online without a GED or high school diploma?
There may be options available. You can apply as a non-traditional student at colleges that accept students without a GED or high school diploma. Community colleges may also admit students without these credentials, allowing them to pursue individual courses or complete a degree program. Additionally, you could enroll as a lifelong student to take classes without aiming for a degree. Some colleges even offer programs that allow you to earn your high school diploma while beginning your college career.

6. What are the admission requirements for college without a GED or high school diploma?
Admission requirements vary, but they could include meeting a minimum age requirement, enrolling in remedial courses, providing proof of academic accomplishments, submitting a personal statement, and submitting standardized test scores such as the SAT or ACT for adult students.

7. Am I eligible for financial aid without a GED or high school diploma?
Many federal student loans require a high school diploma or GED, but there is a federal program called “Ability to Benefit” that may provide assistance.

8. Which colleges and universities do not require a GED or high school diploma?

There are various colleges and universities across the country that do not require a GED or high school diploma. The article provides sponsored listings of some of these institutions.

This is an offer for educational opportunities that may lead to employment and not an offer for nor a guarantee of employment. Students should consult with a representative from the school they select to learn more about career opportunities in that field. Program outcomes vary according to each institution’s specific program curriculum.

What Could I Do With a Public Health Degree?

What could I do with a bachelor’s degree in public health?

A Public Health Degree opens the door to a wide array of career possibilities. Opportunities span across diverse fields, including health services, environmental health, community health work, and biotechnician roles. A career path in the public health arena might lead to employment within health agencies. For those aspiring to advance, pursuing further education, such as a graduate degree, could unlock managerial positions within the industry. Public health professionals play a pivotal role in shaping public health policies, while others may contribute to health promotion through impactful social work. The O*NET resource provides valuable insights into the breadth of opportunities available within this dynamic and essential career field.

Health Educator and Community Health Worker

Within this field, a variety of roles await, spanning from health education specialists to community health workers and counselors, among others. The employment landscape for these professionals is equally diverse, encompassing environments like hospitals, government agencies, outpatient care facilities, and family services. Opportunities exist within both the public and private sectors. Drawing from data provided by the BLS, we’ve compiled insights into the 2021 annual median salary and projected job growth for these positions.

2023 Median Salary: $62,860 
Job growth through 2032: 7% (Faster than average)
Typical Entry-level education: Bachelor’s degree

Medical and Health Services Manager

This profession is centered around managerial roles within an office environment. The positions falling under this category may carry various titles, with “public health administrator” being a common one. Often, these roles are open in both the public and private sectors, extending their presence across governmental agencies, outpatient care centers, medical practices, and nursing facilities. Using data from the BLS, we have compiled information regarding the 2023 annual median salary and projected job growth for these positions. 

2023 Median Salary: $110,680 
Job growth through 2032: 28% (Much faster than average)
Typical Entry-level education: Bachelor’s degree

Occupational Health and Safety Specialist

This profession commonly presents opportunities across diverse sectors. Specialized roles and technical positions are often in demand. These openings can span various industries, encompassing manufacturing, hospitals, construction, government, and management services. The responsibilities of individuals in this role are crucial for ensuring safety at their respective workplaces, whether it’s a construction site or a government facility. Their primary duty is to uphold standards and ensure tasks are carried out safely and effectively. Utilizing data from the BLS, we have assembled information regarding the 2023 annual median salary and projected job growth for these positions. 

2023 Median Salary: $77,580 
Job growth through 2032: 13% (Much faster than average)
Typical Entry-level education: Associate’s degree

Social and Community Service Manager

The primary domains for professionals in this field encompass local government, religious organizations, family services, community rehabilitation services, and nursing facilities. These roles might involve managerial positions in various sectors and entail close collaboration with organizations to execute and realize plans. Using data from the BLS, we have compiled information regarding the 2023 annual median salary and projected job growth. 

2023 Median Salary: $77,030 
Job growth through 2032: 9% (Much faster than average)
Typical Entry-level education: Bachelor’s degree

Natural Sciences Manager

This career might attract individuals seeking to oversee teams of researchers. These positions typically span roles in research and development, manufacturing, scientific management, or government agencies. These career paths often require a combination of hands-on involvement and remote management. Drawing data from the BLS, we have compiled information regarding the 2023 annual median salary and projected job growth in this field. 

2023 Median Salary: $157,740 
Job growth through 2032: 5% (Faster than average)
Typical Entry-level education: Bachelor’s degree

Management Analyst

There may be different careers in this field to consider. Management analysts may also take on positions such as business operations specialist. This job may be found in a number of areas including in the professional and scientific communities. Insurance, government and simply management are also areas where one  could be employed in this field. Per the BLS, we compiled the 2023 annual median salary and job growth. 

2023 Median Salary: $99,410 
Job growth through 2032: 10% (Much faster than average)
Typical Entry-level education: Bachelor’s degree

Environmental Engineer

This type of engineer may work in many different fields. One area may include wastewater engineer. There may be many areas where they work including the federal government, engineering services, state and local government and management services. Per the BLS, we compiled the 2023 annual median salary and job growth. 

2023 Median Salary: $100,090 
Job growth through 2032: 6% (Faster than average)
Typical Entry-level education: Bachelor’s degree

What could I do with master’s degree in public health?

With an MPH degree, individuals may hold more advanced positions. They may conduct research or work on advocacy for the general public as a whole. Others with a masters in public health may work in health sciences and health informatics. Health administration positions in public health organizations or a related field may also be common. The MPH program may offer many options including these in the United States.

Mathematicians and Statisticians

These positions may encompass all types of careers as mathematicians and statisticians. Biostatisticians are just one of the fields. The positions available for this type of field may be those of management, technical consulting or government work. Many of these positions may be in the federal government, working in research facilities, and healthcare. There may be positions in education as well on all different levels. Per the BLS, we compiled the 2023 annual median salary and job growth. 

2023 Median Salary: $104,860 
Job growth through 2032: 30% (Much faster than average)
Typical Entry-level education: Master’s degree

Epidemiologist

A career as an epidemiologist could have different titles such as life scientist. There may be  many fields and areas in which one may work as an epidemiologist. Some of the areas in which one may have this career are in research and development, hospitals and government on all levels. There may also be positions available at colleges and universities as well as with all other levels of schooling on the state and local level. Per the BLS, we compiled the 2023 annual median salary and job growth. 

2023 Median Salary: $81,390 
Job growth through 2032: 27% (Faster than average)
Typical Entry-level education: Master’s degree

Mental Health Counselor

This career could encompass a number of different types of counseling professions. Some may deal with substance abuse, behavioral, or mental health. The positions available may be with the government, hospitals or family services. There may also be positions in this field with outpatient services as well as residential recovery facilities. Per the BLS, we compiled the 2023 annual median salary and job growth. 

2023 Median Salary: $53,710 
Job growth through 2032: 18% (Much faster than average)
Typical Entry-level education: Master’s degree

What could I do with a PhD in public health?

After completing your master of public health degree program, you may want to continue with education. Working in public health as a biostatistician or doing research in social sciences may be an option for those with this advanced degree. Public health jobs at this level may include coursework in a topic that is important to you. You may wish to do outreach.

Medical Scientist

There may be multiple areas for this professions including as a life scientist. There may also be many areas in which you could work when seeking this type of position. Some areas may include doctor’s offices, colleges and universities, hospitals, and medicine manufacturing. A career in this field may include jobs in or out of an office or lab, these are full time positions. Per the BLS, we compiled the 2023 annual median salary and job growth. 

2023 Median Salary: $100,890 
Job growth through 2032: 10% (Much faster than average)
Typical Entry-level education: PhD

Economist

A health economist is one who may predict and determine how money may be flowing in the world of healthcare. There may be a number of areas in which to obtain this type of position in both the public and private sector. Fields to look at may include finance, federal government, research and development, consulting services and state government. Per the BLS, we compiled the 2023 annual median salary and job growth. 

2023 Median Salary: $115,730 
Job growth through 2032: 6% (Much faster than average)
Typical Entry-level education: Minimum of a master’s degree, doctorate preferred

Postsecondary Teacher

In this field postsecondary health teachers earn an  a median salary of $79,640 per year. These positions are held primarily at colleges and universities. These could be public or private and may range from a trade school, community college, junior college or major college or university. Per the BLS, we compiled the 2023 annual median salary and job growth. 

2023 Median Salary: $84,380 
Job growth through 2032: 8% (Faster than average)
Typical Entry-level education: Master’s level at minimum, PhD preferred

Hospital President or Top Executive

Top executives may be necessary in all fields to provide leadership for businesses or organizations. In the medical field these people may be in positions to run hospitals. The positions may be available on all levels in all fields. Areas to look into might include healthcare and government. Per the BLS, we compiled the 2023 annual median salary and job growth. 

2023 Median Salary: $103,840 
Job growth through 2032: 3% (As fast as average)
Typical Entry-level education: Minimum of a bachelor’s, PhD preferred

What Could You Do with a Public Health Degree by Specialty/Field?

Degree programs in public health may open the door for numerous opportunities. Public health professionals may work in research and data development. Others may work in nonprofit careers. Here are some degree concentrations to consider.

Biostatistics

This focus program typically offers careers in multiple fields. This concentration may be available on all levels from bachelor’s to PhD. The focus of this group is often to collect and interpret data when it comes to medicine and public health.

Research Biostatistician

This type of statistician typically requires at minimum a master’s degree. This field may work to apply data and statistics to solve problems related to health. They may look at varying factors based on the sector in which they are employed. Per the O*NET, we compiled the 2023 annual median salary and job growth. 

2023 Median Salary: $104,110 
Job growth through 2032: 9% or higher (Much faster than average)

Biostatistics Professor

In this field as a Mathematical Science Teachers many may need a PhD. This is a position that may be available at most colleges and universities that offer this type of program. Many times these may be people who have worked in the field and may use real world knowledge to teach the students. Per the O*NET, we compiled the 2023 annual median salary and job growth. 

2023 Median Salary: $81,020 
Job growth through 2032: 4% (Slower than average)

Community Health

This area may focus on awareness and education. People in this area may learn to develop and evaluate health programs for the community. They may also work to raise awareness regarding health problems.

Social and Community Service Managers

In this career as a community service manager you may work at providing programs and supervising organizations that are designed to promote well being. Many of these positions are through local health departments or governments. They may also be available on a state and national level. This typically needs at least a bachelor’s degree. Per the BLS, we compiled the 2023 annual median salary and job growth. 

2023 Median Salary: $77,030 
Job growth through 2032: 9% (Much faster than average)

Health Educator

As a health educator you may be working to teach the community about health and wellness. In many cases this is a position through a local health department or in a school setting. These positions may be in the public or private sector and in many cases require a bachelor’s degree. Per the BLS, we compiled the 2023 annual median salary and job growth. 

2023 Median Salary: $62,860 
Job growth through 2032: 7% (Much faster than average)

Dieticians and Nutritionists

As a dietician, you may work to teach people about nutrition and what types of foods they should be eating. You may also work with individuals to promote a healthy lifestyle and to learn what is the best course of action to improve their overall health. This position typically needs at least a bachelor’s degree and could be found in hospitals, nursing facilities as well as doctor’s offices. Per the BLS, we compiled the 2023 annual median salary and job growth. 

2023 Median Salary: $69,680 
Job growth through 2032: 7% (Much faster than average)

Environmental Health

There are a number of fields and concentrations that may be covered in environmental health. Zoonotic diseases, disease prevention and occupational hazards are covered. Living conditions and air quality are also topics that are covered in this concentration.

Environmental Scientist

As an environmental scientist you may work to protect the environment. You may also work to protect and promote human growth either in the field or in a lab. There may be positions available for this in both the public and private sector and this positions requires the minimum of a bachelor’s degree. Per the BLS, we compiled the 2023 annual median salary and job growth. 

2023 Median Salary: $78,980 
Job growth through 2032: 6% (Much faster than average)

Petroleum Engineer

When working in the field of as a petroleum engineer, there may be need for those who are on the outlook for the safety and overall well being of the public. This may be where someone with a bachelor’s in environmental health could come into play working to not only protect the public. This type of position is usually through government regulatory agencies. Per the BLS, we compiled the 2021 annual median salary and job growth. 

2023 Median Salary: $135,690 
Job growth through 2032: 2% (As fast as average)

Mining and Geological Engineers

When working in the field of mining when it comes to environmental health you may be working to make sure that the mines themselves are not only safe but the work they are doing and the outcome of the work is safe for the environment and the surrounding communities as well. This position may require at least a bachelor’s degree and is offered both in the public and private sector. Per the BLS, we compiled the 2023 annual median salary and job growth. 

2023 Median Salary: $100,640 
Job growth through 2032: 2% (Faster than average)

Waste Management

As a waste management compliance officer you may work to ensure that the organization you are working for is following all governmental and company guidelines when it comes to waste production and disposal. The goal may be to work with the communities to ensure what your company is doing and is safe. This position may need at least a bachelor’s degree. Per the BLS, we compiled the 2023 annual median salary and job growth. 

2023 Median Salary: $ 75,670
Job growth through 2032: N/A

Epidemiology

When studying in the focus area of epidemiology you may be learning about a number of things regarding human life. You may cover areas such as life expectancy, infection and disease. You may learn research methods, data analysis, as well as causes and solutions in regards to disease spread and prevention.

Epidemiologist

The position of epidemiologist is typically to investigate disease and injury. This position often requires a master’s degree and is available in public and private hospitals as well as in federal and state governments. They may look at patterns and causes of the diseases and injuries in order to make assessments. Per the BLS, we compiled the 2023 annual median salary and job growth. 

2023 Median Salary: $81,390 
Job growth through 2032: 27% (Faster than average)

Global Health

In the focus area of global health one may look at health programs on a global scale. You may look at potential solutions for health issues on a worldwide scale. In this focus area, there may be comparing and contrasting the differing health systems around the world.

Policy Analyst

A policy analyst may be working as a political scientist to look at the different policies being applied to public health. The goal is typically to see how these are being applied and who they may effect and in what matter to best implement new policies. This may be a position that requires at least a master’s degree. Per the BLS, we compiled the 2023 annual median salary and job growth.

2023 Median Salary:$132,350 
Job growth through 2032: 7% (Faster than average)

Global Health Consultant

As a global health consultant you may be working as a management analyst to help improve the efficiency and productivity in regards to health and wellness. When in this position you may be looking at things on a larger, global scale. You typically need at least a bachelor’s degree and may be able to obtain positions in the government, public and private sector. Per the BLS, we compiled the 2023 annual median salary and job growth.

2023 Median Salary: $99,410 
Job growth through 2032: 10% (Much faster than average)

Health Education Specialist

As a health education specialist you may provide and mange programs in the community. These programs may be designed to promote health and wellness to many age groups and to many different backgrounds. This position typically requires at least a bachelor’s degree and is available primarily in local and state governments as well as hospitals. Per the BLS, we compiled the 2023 annual median salary and job growth.

2023 Median Salary: $62,860
Job growth through 2032: N/A

Health Equity

When studying health equity one may look at the differences and disparities in healthcare and treatment among different groups of people. This is often primarily a focus in master’s programs.

Food Scientist

A food scientist may work primarily in the agriculture industry. The goal is typically to improve safety and efficiency. The positions may be available in the public and private sector or with different government agencies and require at least a bachelor’s degree. Per the BLS, we compiled the 2023 annual median salary and job growth.

2023 Median Salary: $82,090
Job growth through 2032: 6% (Faster than average)

Health and Human Services

Group Home Administrator

As a group home administrator you may work with the organization you are working with to manage the business activities of the group home. You may be working as the health services manager for this organization and may need to have at least a bachelor’s degree. Per the BLS, we compiled the 2023 annual median salary and job growth.

2023 Median Salary: $110,680 
Job growth through 2032: 28% (Much faster than average)

Social Worker

As a social worker you may be asked to counsel and assist those with mental, and physical health ailments in order to aid in providing assistance and solutions to solve these issues. This position typically requires a bachelor’s degree and is available at all levels of government as well as in the private sector. Per the BLS, we compiled the 2023 annual median salary and job growth.

2023 Median Salary:$58,380
Job growth through 2032: 7% (Much faster than average)

Colleges That Accept Transfer Credits with Bad Grades

Seeking assistance in locating colleges that readily accept transfer credits despite subpar grades? If you’re in search of guidance on the subject of transferring to new academic institutions with less-than-stellar grades, your fortune has taken a turn for the better. Numerous four-year colleges and universities typically mandate a minimum GPA of 2.0 and exclusively consider transfer credits for courses bearing a grade no less than a C.

Find an Online Degree Program

Maybe you started in community college to save money? Or maybe you’re changing your area of study. Perhaps your current school just isn’t a good fit? In fact, there are many reasons students find themselves among the one third of undergrads transferring colleges per the NCES. Although if you earned a low GPA in college so far, your school choices may seem limited.

Fun Fact

Transfer students wanted! According to the National Association for College Admission Counseling, 9 out of every 10 four-year institutions consider transfer students to be of significant or moderate importance when it comes to fulfilling their overall enrollment objectives.

STEPS TO TRANSFERRING COLLEGES WITH BAD GRADES 

If you’re contemplating a transfer to another educational institution and happen to possess less-than-stellar grades, there may still be viable avenues available. The following steps can serve as a valuable guide to navigate the process of transferring colleges despite a less impressive GPA. Naturally, always keep a keen eye on those crucial transfer application deadlines!

STEP #1: IDENTIFY THE ROOT CAUSE OF YOUR LOW GRADES

Delve into the reasons behind your academic setbacks. Firstly, assess whether the chosen academic program was a mismatch for your needs. Secondly, reflect on whether life circumstances significantly affected your academic performance. Regardless of the circumstances, pinpointing the underlying causes is crucial at this stage. This insight will empower you to formulate a strategic plan for future academic achievement.

Keep in mind that the admissions office at your prospective institution may require a comprehensive plan outlining how you intend to surmount the challenges that hindered your progress at your previous school. Thus, engage in a thorough self-assessment.

STEP #2: EXPLORE COLLEGE OPTIONS

Conduct extensive research to identify colleges that are receptive to transfer students with less impressive GPAs, thus expanding your range of possibilities. To enhance your prospects of discovering an institution that suits your needs, it’s advisable to cast a broad net during your search. Don’t overlook the potential of online schools as well.

If your prior college credits were earned some time ago, or if you’re presently engaged in the workforce, online schools can emerge as a highly viable option for pursuing a degree without necessitating a major upheaval in your life.

STEP #3: TALK TO AN ADMISSIONS ADVISOR

Statistics from the National Association for College Admission Counseling reveal that a significant 81% of colleges boast at least one admissions officer dedicated solely to prospective transfer students. Hence, it’s essential to initiate contact with the admissions department at your targeted institutions, connecting with an expert who can guide you in determining the most suitable path for your transfer.

During these interactions, be ready to share your personal narrative along with the strategic plan for future success that you developed in Step #1. This will enable the advisor to better understand your journey and assist you accordingly.

Benefits of an Admissions Counselor

Certain colleges extend the extra support of assigning each incoming student a dedicated re-entry counselor, aimed at facilitating every aspect of their return to academia. It’s important to note that re-entry counselors take an additional step by aiding you in evaluating your preparedness for college, assisting in the completion of essential paperwork, and strategically mapping out your academic journey.

STEP #4: IMPROVE YOUR GPA

What should you do if your GPA bears the weight of one or two courses with a grade of D or below? In such instances, provided you have the time and resources at your disposal, consider the option of bolstering your GPA by retaking these courses. As long as you retake the course for a traditional letter grade (rather than opting for Pass/Fail), the improved grade can supplant the lower one and enhance your overall GPA.

Additionally, some colleges offer a process known as “academic renewal” to students who’ve faced challenges in a specific course or semester. Academic renewal essentially expunges the grade for a course (or even an entire semester) from your academic record. Consequently, these grades are removed from the GPA calculation and replaced on official transcripts as “AR.”

It’s worth noting that the feasibility of academic renewal varies from one institution to another, so it’s advisable to reach out to both your current school and prospective school to ascertain the requirements for obtaining approval for this process. After all, with a bit of effort, you can potentially uncover several colleges willing to accept transfer credits despite less-than-ideal grades.

STEP #5: REQUEST LETTERS OF RECOMMENDATION

Why should you consider seeking letters of recommendation from college professors? Well, primarily because these letters, especially when they come from professors within your chosen academic field, possess the potential to leave a favorable impression on the admissions counselors evaluating your application at your prospective school.

Indeed, the perspectives of faculty members who have observed your performance in college-level coursework can be particularly valuable. However, don’t overlook the potential merit of high school recommendations, especially if you lack substantial representation from college faculty.

Furthermore, always remember to express your gratitude by sending a heartfelt thank-you note to the faculty members who take the time to craft these letters of recommendation!

STEP #6: STRENGTHEN YOUR APPLICATION THROUGH ADDITIONAL EXPERIENCE

In cases where your academic performance has been less than exceptional, it becomes increasingly vital to complement your application with enriching experiences. To sum it up, part-time employment, volunteer service, and engagement in various activities during summer and winter breaks can enhance your overall attractiveness as a prospective student. In essence, strive to present yourself as a valuable potential addition to the student community at your desired school.

STEP #7: DETERMINE THE BEST TIME TO TRANSFER

If you find yourself in your first year of college and contemplating a transfer, it’s worth noting that many colleges take high school grades into account, especially when you have limited college credits.

For those students who have amassed more than a year’s worth of college credits, a prudent strategy might involve remaining at your current institution until you’ve secured an associate’s degree. This approach safeguards against the loss of credit for individual courses carrying D grades. Generally, the credits constituting the associate’s degree are transferred as a cohesive unit.

In cases where gaining admission to an undergraduate degree program remains a challenge, you might explore the possibility of applying as a non-degree-seeking candidate. This path allows you to commence coursework relevant to your intended major and, by demonstrating strong performance in these courses, subsequently reapply for formal admission to the college.

DO GRADES TRANSFER WHEN YOU TRANSFER COLLEGES?

When you embark on the process of transferring colleges, the customary practice involves the awarding of credit for courses in which you’ve achieved a grade of C or better. Consequently, the actual grades themselves do not transfer, but the credit earned does. As a result, your GPA at your new institution generally does not incorporate the grades or GPA from your previous school.

If your goal is to preserve transfer credit for courses in which you obtained a D grade, one viable approach is to remain at your current school long enough to complete an associate’s degree. Typically, when transferring a degree earned, the credits are transferred as a unified block, and each individual course is not subjected to separate evaluations for transfer eligibility.

LIST OF 4 COLLEGES THAT MAY ACCEPT TRANSFER STUDENTS WITH BAD GRADES

Transferring to a different college with subpar grades can pose challenges. Yet, numerous institutions recognize the potential for improvement that comes with a change in environment. If you’re seeking guidance on transferring with less-than-ideal grades, delve into the process and peruse our selection of colleges below that often admit transfer students with D grades or lower GPAs.

1

Strayer University

MINIMUM TRANSFER REQUIREMENTS:

Incoming courses must be equivalent in content and outcomes to courses at Strayer University.

  • Students are required to have attained a grade of at least “C” in the respective course. Alternatively, a grade of “D” or better is acceptable if the student has successfully completed an associate’s degree at the same institution where the intended transfer course(s) originate. Additionally, the course duration must meet or exceed a minimum of 4.5 quarter hours or 3.0 semester hours.

Students accepted with specifications may have other requirements.

ABOUT STRAYER UNIVERSITY

Strayer University is an accredited institution with a proud history of 130 years in quality education. Most of Strayer’s programs are online; however, they also have a network of campuses around the U.S. where you can get support in person. Strayer university has designed a learning experience that supports you on your journey to success support in person. Strayer university has designed a learning experience that supports you on your journey to success.

Available Programs

2

U Mass, Online

MINIMUM TRANSFER REQUIREMENTS:

UMass Online typically grants transfer credit for courses where the student has earned a grade of 1.7 (equivalent to C-) or higher. While UMass generally requires a minimum overall GPA of 2.0, it’s important to note that this 2.0 GPA requirement is waived for all former students of UMass Amherst.

ABOUT UMASS ONLINE

U Mass Online offers over 150 degrees and certificates from the University of Massachusetts in a convenient online format to busy professionals, lifelong learners, and students worldwide.

Available Programs

  • Bachelor of Arts (BA) in Crime and Justice Studies
  • Bachelor’s in Information Technology: Business Minor
  • BA in Economics
  • Bachelor of Arts (BA) in English
  • Psychology Bachelors of Arts

3

Colorado State University Global

MINIMUM TRANSFER REQUIREMENTS:

Colorado State University Global encourages students with less than a 2.30 cumulative GPA on prior college credit to apply for provisional admission with:

  • Written statement of purpose detailing professional goals and future study plans
  • Detailed resume
  • Completion of an online assessment

Once provisionally admitted, undergraduate students must complete six credits and be in good academic standing after their first two trimesters at CSUGlobal.

ABOUT COLORADO STATE UNIVERSITY GLOBAL

CSU-Global is an online university offering degree programs designed for working adults, using a virtual classroom designed to provide students with the same learning opportunities offered at brick-and-mortar colleges and universities. CSU-Global students can take advantage of accelerated 8-week courses and monthly starts.

Available Programs

  • Bachelor of Science (BS) in Project Management
  • BS in Organizational Leadership
  • Information Technology Bachelor of Science
  • BS in Human Resource Management
  • Bachelor of Science (BS) in Healthcare Administration and Management

4

Western Governors University

MINIMUM TRANSFER REQUIREMENTS:

WGU maintains relationships with many community colleges across the United States. Each transcript will be evaluated on an individual basis. WGU does not list minimum GPA requirements for which credits may transfer.

ABOUT WGU

Western Governors University offers competency based and affordable degree programs. Tuition often averages under $4,000 a term. That is about half the cost of most other online universities. Programs start monthly. There is a $65 application fee that can be waived. Apply free this week!

Available Programs

What should I do if my GPA is too low for transferring?

If your GPA falls below 2.0 and you aim to transfer, you may need to submit an appeal, explore second chance programs (refer to the “Starting Over” section under “Common Reasons to Transfer” below), or consider taking a semester off before reapplying as a transfer student.

Do colleges consider applicants with poor grades?

Admission to colleges is still possible even with subpar grades. However, it’s essential to make the rest of your college application shine brightly to enhance your chances of acceptance.

Is it possible to transfer colleges with poor grades?

While some colleges might accept students with low grades for various reasons, they might offer conditional admission where students must perform well in their initial semester. The possibility of transferring with a low GPA depends on several factors, including the policies of the college and the expectations of the student at the new institution.

Will My College Credits Transfer?

In the fall of 2022-23, the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES) reported a staggering enrollment of 1,206,316 degree-seeking undergraduate students in postsecondary institutions as transfer-in students. Among these students, the pursuit of “College Credits” played a pivotal role in their educational journey. These enrollees were distributed across a diverse landscape of 3,421 institutions nationwide. This article will shine a spotlight on colleges that went above and beyond in accommodating transfer students, with a focus on their policies regarding the transfer of college credits. If you’re considering transferring, read on to discover institutions that may align with your academic aspirations.

  • 1. UMD Global Campus
  • 2. CSU Fullerton
  • 3. Southern New Hampshire, up to 90 credits
  • 4. University of Maryland Global, up to 90 credits
  • 5. San Francisco State University
  • 6. University of Central Florida
  • 7. Arizona State, potentially all credits can transfer
  • 8. San Jose State University
  • 9. Chamberlain University
  • 10. University of North Texas
  • 11. California State University, 90+ transfer credits
  • 12. Florida International University
  • 13. Liberty University
  • 14. American Public University System, up to 90 credits

It’s truly remarkable, as revealed by a study conducted by the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES), that over one-third of undergraduate students engage in transferring college credits at least once during their academic journey. What’s even more intriguing is that 11% of these students opt for a second transfer. If you’re contemplating a transition to a different institution, it’s imperative to familiarize yourself with the intricacies of the college credit transfer process. Understanding this process can potentially save you both time and money. Let’s delve into how this process unfolds.

Find an Online Degree Program

How Many Credits Can You Transfer?

ARTICULATION AGREEMENTS

One potential avenue for transferring credits revolves around enrolling in a college that maintains a formal agreement with your current institution. These agreements often delineate the specific courses from a two-year school that are eligible for transfer to a four-year institution. Various types of transfer agreements exist, including:

  • Statewide Agreements: Typically permitting students to transfer credits earned at a public two-year college to any public four-year institution within the same state. This option is particularly appealing for students who wish to remain close to home.
  • GenEd to GenEd and Core to Core: Some colleges may endorse specific two-year degrees that can seamlessly fulfill a four-year college’s core general education prerequisites.
  • Program to Program Agreements: In such cases, an institution usually establishes a pact with a particular two-year college, providing students with a structured roadmap of courses to complete in preparation for a four-year program at the transfer institution.
  • Guaranteed Admission Agreements (2 + 2): These agreements enable students to complete two years of coursework at a two-year college followed by two years at a four-year institution, ensuring a smooth transition.

Southern New Hampshire University

  • No application fee for April & June terms.
  • Take advantage of some of the nation’s most affordable tuition rates, while earning a degree from a private, nonprofit, NEASC accredited university
  • Multiple term start dates throughout the year. 24/7 online classroom access.
  • Popular Online Programs include Business Administration, Psychology, Information Technology, Human Services…

Other Transfer Options

If the options above are not viable, it still may be possible to transfer your credits to a new school.

First, check with the school’s transfer site or admissions office. Look for their minimum and max number of transfer credits allowed. Second, learn their grade requirements, and find out if they have expiration dates on credits. Last, figure out how to determine if the content of your earned courses are equal to courses at the new school.

You may also be able to earn credit for military training or other life experience. CLEP or other exam based credits may also be accepted.

Transfer Advisers

Some colleges may have a specific person who handles transfer credits. These advisers often work one on one with transfer students. They may help prepare application forms. They may also arrange tours, or seek out mentors for students in the transfer process.

TRANSFER CREDITS FROM A COMMUNITY COLLEGE

In a study, NCES it was revealed that 56% of transfer students originated from public two-year colleges. When considering the transfer from a community college to a four-year institution, there are often multiple pathways available that aim to minimize credit loss.

HOW MANY COLLEGE CREDITS WILL TRANSFER?

If you live in a state that has transfer agreements between it’s public two and four year colleges, all of your credits may transfer. If your state does not have this type of agreement, you may have to do the research to find what will transfer.

DO D’S TRANSFER FROM COMMUNITY COLLEGE?

Many schools ask for a C grade or better in order to transfer credits. But, there are ways you may still be able to transfer without losing credit for those courses where you earned a D. First, check the transfer policy of the school you want to go to. They may have a flexible policy on accepting credits for D’s. If not, you may want to meet with the college to see what options are available to you.

Second, consider staying at your community college long enough to earn your Associate’s degree. After you earn that degree, you can apply to a four year school knowing that your credits may transfer in a block. When you transfer credits as a block, individual grades may not be evaluated.

DO COMMUNITY COLLEGE CREDITS TRANSFER OUT OF STATE?

Formal transfer agreements are rare between public schools in different states. Without an agreement, the transfer eligibility for each course may be assessed individually.

If you transfer from a regionally accredited community college, your new school may accept credit for the core courses in your field of study. They may also accept some electives if they directly mirror courses offered at the new school. Another option may be an online college. Some online colleges may have out of state agreements with state wide public two year colleges.

ONLINE COLLEGES THAT ACCEPT TRANSFER CREDITS

When looking for colleges that accept transfer credits many of the four year online colleges below will accept up to 90 transfer credits. This is about 75% of total credits you need for a bachelors degree. This means that you may be able to transfer all of your credits from your previous college work. Keep in mind that the info below is for undergrad transfer requests only.

Steps to Transferring Your College Credits 

While each school may have unique college transfer requirements, there are some general steps you can follow to facilitate the transfer of your credits:

  1. Meet with your academic adviser: Initiate a discussion with your academic adviser to outline your transfer objectives and explore the feasibility from both academic and financial perspectives.
  2. Fill out a transfer application: Note that this application may differ from what first-year students typically use. If you encounter difficulties in locating the appropriate application, don’t hesitate to reach out to the school’s admissions office for guidance.
  3. Maintain Strong Academic Performance: Transfer policies can vary among schools, but most institutions expect you to have accrued a specific number of credits for transfer consideration. Some may also impose a minimum GPA requirement. If your GPA is lower than desired, don’t worry; there are colleges that accept transfer students with lower GPAs.
  4. Contact the right department: Reach out to the department pertinent to your intended major (e.g., the science department for Biology majors). Inquire whether you can submit your transcript for evaluation to determine the transferability of credits to your new program.
  5. Secure Letters of Recommendation: Approach your professors well in advance to request letters of recommendation. Give them ample time to complete and submit these letters on your behalf. While high school letters may be acceptable, colleges generally prefer recommendations from instructors you’ve most recently studied under at the college level.
  6. Be on Time: Timely submission of all required documents is essential. Missing deadlines can create an unfavorable impression during the transfer process.

Colleges that Accept Low GPA

Colleges today use many tools to get to know prospective students, one of which may be your GPA. Or, grade point average. What if you did not do as well as you hoped in high school and have a low GPA? There are colleges that might still accept you.

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Here are a few guidelines to understanding how colleges view the GPA. Plus a few helpful hints on how to add value to your application. Despite low GPA scores.

WHAT IS CONSIDERED A LOW GPA?

To know what a ‘low GPA’ is, you need to understand what the GPA is. Then put it into context of the colleges you want to apply to. Most colleges use a point scale of 4.0. So, a grade of A = 4 points, B = 3 points, C = 2 points, D= 1 point and F = zero points. The average of all the points for all the courses you took in high school is your GPA. According to the latest study by the NCES, GPAs have gone up over time. In their last study, they found the national average GPA was 3.0.

If your GPA is less than the national average, you might guess it is a low GPA. And when compared in this way, anything below 3.0 is low. But many colleges do not use the GPA to predict your readiness for college. These schools may not set a GPA you need to get in. Or, they may set their standards at 2.0 or 2.5. In this case, if you have a 2.75 GPA, while lower than others in the US, it may be high for that college.

CAN I GET INTO A GOOD COLLEGE WITH A LOW GPA?

Many colleges accept students with a low GPA if you use 3.0 as the metric.  One reason is the preference for standard test scores. The SAT for example, or ACT. To that point, not every SAT test taker has a high GPA either. The College Board who runs the SAT found that in 2019, almost half of test takers had grades between B through F.

That breaks down as 31% were B students (80 – 89), 10% were C students (70 – 79) and 2% had grades below 70. So, either a D, E, or F. There are also colleges with open admissions policies. Community and vocational schools, for example. These schools might accept anyone with a high school diploma or GED.

A range of colleges also set their lowest acceptable GPA well below the national norm. This can be 2.0 or from 2.5 to 3.0 and varies from one college to the next. If your GPA and SAT or ACT scores are lower, do not give up. But, you might have to make sure you stand out in other ways.

HOW TO GET INTO COLLEGE WITH A LOW GPA?

There are a few ways to improve your odds at getting into college, low GPA and all. Here are 5 tips to put into use when you apply.

1. HIGHLIGHT YOUR STRENGTHS

Your GPA may not impress. But your other qualities might make you an ideal option for the colleges on your list.
Both undergrad and graduate schools often look at an applicant from all sides. Things like community service, a part time job, and volunteer work all count.

For example, you won an award or take part in activities outside school. Or have a military background that kept you moving from place to place. Many colleges that accept low GPAs consider life experience instead.

2. HOLISTIC ADMISSIONS

Many colleges do set a GPA standard, but also give options to get around a low one. These schools tend to look at your application (and you) as a package deal. This means they may weigh other things which can help you make up for poor grades. Like your essay, goals, work experience, references and SAT / ACT scores.

Any of these are a perfect opportunity to add depth to your application. And, may help you select schools that strive to see you as a complete person instead of as a sum of your GPA.

3. WRITE A GREAT PERSONAL STATEMENT OR ESSAY

Many colleges want to know who is behind the GPA. As the GPA is a static number, your essay or personal statement can bring it to life. Colleges tend to include specific details to format these things. Desired word count, for instance, or AP style. It is a good idea to stick to their structure as it shows you can read and follow directions. But, you can be creative, positive and even emotional. Describe what you learned and what direction you hope your career will take.

If the reason you got a low GPA taught you something, it might be appropriate to fit it in too. It may point to your strengths and how you’ve matured as a person. Show this side of yourself to the admissions team. Be clear, focused, use spell check and highlight your writing skills.

4. HIGH QUALITY REFERENCES OR LETTERS OF RECOMMENDATION

Many experts agree that high quality references help an application shine. Even if your grades do not. Your letters of recommendation can show attributes. Qualities that the school might miss by looking only at your GPA. References from teachers who watched your progress for example. They might note your poor grades as a freshman and sophomore. Plus, they can describe your effort to improve your GPA as junior or senior. This points to your discipline and commitment.

Employers also make great references as they can point to your work ethic. How you perform in a business setting is also a sign of reliability. If you take any lessons (E.g. piano, karate) also ask coaches, mentors and teachers to write letters. These references can show how you apply feedback and training.

5. SOME SCHOOLS OFFER CONDITIONAL ACCEPTANCE

Some colleges that accept low GPA students offer them conditional acceptance. This means you don’t have a strong enough grades for full acceptance. But they admit you anyway. This type of acceptance tends to come with a few rules you need to abide by. For one, as a student, you must keep up a specific GPA. Or, take a certain number of credits per semester.

Other times, you may need to take basic courses before you enter the program. Then if you meet these conditions, after a certain period of time, many colleges remove them. Take away? If there are colleges you want to apply to, check if they offer conditional acceptance. See what they would want you to do, and think about if you could do it.

Low GPA Colleges

SCHOOLS WITH LOW GPA REQUIREMENTS

A low high school GPA does not have to prevent you from getting into college or grad school. To help you find colleges that accept low GPAs, You may want to check out our list of open admissions colleges. We compiled a list using data from the NCES and College Scorecard. Education Connection does work with some of the schools on this list.

Colleges that accept 1.0 GPA

If you have a very low GPA, these schools with high acceptance rates / open admissions may consider you.

1

Western Governors

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Admission Requirements:

  • Have earned a high school diploma or GED
  • Submit official transcripts of all prior grades completed at community colleges or other colleges you’ve gone to.
  • Be at least 16 years of age
  • Meet any program specific requirements
  • Admission Rate: Open Admission
  • Grad Rate: 70%
  • Average Annual Cost: $13,870
  • Business
  • Health and Wellness
  • Health Administration 
  • Registered Nursing
  • Criminal Justice
  • Accounting
  • Human Services 

2

Martinsburg College

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Admission Requirements:

  • High school diploma or earned a GED.
  • Complete an admissions interview
  • Admission Rate: 100%
  • Grad Rate: 84%
  • Average Annual Cost: $14,680
  • Health Administration
  • Medical Assisting
  • Business
  • Homeland Security
  • Accounting

3

Midwest Institute

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Admission Requirements:

  • High school or GED considered but not required
  • Admission Rate: 100%
  • Grad Rate: 90%
  • Average Annual Cost: $22,126
  • Dental Assistant
  • Medical Assisting
  • Massage Therapy
  • HVAC

4

Montana State University – Northern

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Admission Requirements:

  • High school or GED considered but not required
  • Admission Rate: 100%
  • Grad Rate: 37%
  • Average Annual Cost: $12,898
  • Vehicle Maintenance
  • Registered Nursing
  • Business Admin
  • Criminal Justice

5

Elizabethtown College School of Continuing and Professional Studies

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Admission Requirements:

  • Minimum of three years of full ime work experience.
  • High school diploma or GED.
  • Have writing ability good enough for success in an accelerated academic program.
  • Have the time to devote to your course work.
  • Admission Rate: 100%
  • Grad Rate: 37%
  • Average Annual Cost: $12,898
  • Business
  • Accounting
  • Human Services
  • Information Science 
  • Communication and Media Studies 

Colleges that accept 2.0 GPA

Here is a list of colleges that accept a low 2.0 GPA. Some of them may accept you with conditions. While others may set the bar at a GPA of 2.0 to 2.25.

1

Albany State University

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Admission Requirements:

  • 2.0 High School GPA
  • SAT: combined 830 or Critical Reading – 24, Math: 22. Writing is not a factor.
  • ACT Scores: English – 17 & Math – 17
  • Admission Rate: 100%
  • Grad Rate: 29%
  • Average Annual Cost: $11,590
  • Liberal Arts
  • RN
  • Criminal Justice
  • Business
  • Education

2

Dallas Nursing Institute

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Admission Requirements:

  • 2.0 GPA
  • Complete application form
  • Non refundable application fee
  • Official transcript of all high school credits, or, GED as well as any college attended
  • Be at least 17 years of age (in accordance with Texas laws, if under 18, a parent or legal guardian signature is required prior to enrollment)
  • Admission Rate: 11%
  • Grad Rate: 59%
  • Average Annual Cost: $21,319
  • Registered Nursing

3

Family of Faith Christian University

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Admission Requirements:

  • 2.0 GPA
  • Applicants for a four year program must take the ACT or SAT and have a minimum composite score of 20 for the ACT and 720 for the SAT.
  • Admission Rate: 80%
  • Grad Rate: 38%
  • Average Annual Cost: $11,548

4

Fort Hays State University

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Admission Requirements:

  • 2.0 GPA
  • ACT composite score of 21 or above OR SAT score 980 or above for tests taken before March 2016 or SAT score 1080 or above for tests taken March 2016 or after
  • Admission Rate: 89%
  • Grad Rate: 63%
  • Average Annual Cost: $12,376
  • Business
  • Liberal Arts
  • Education
  • Nursing
  • Psychology

5

Gwynedd Mercy University

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Admission Requirements:

  • 2.0 GPA
  • Complete the online Admissions application
  • Submit SAT or ACT Scores 
  • Submit an official transcript from each of the high schools, colleges you have attended
  • Admission Rate: 94%
  • Grad Rate: 54%
  • Average Annual Cost: $23,564
  • Nursing
  • Business
  • Education
  • Criminal Justice
  • Psychology

6

Lewis – Clark State College

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Admission Requirements:

  • 2.0 GPA
  • Fill out application.
  • Send a copy of your passport. 
  • Send official school records from each of the high schools and colleges,you have attended
  • Admission Rate: 100%
  • Grad Rate: 39%
  • Average Annual Cost: $11,152
  • Liberal Arts
  • Nursing
  • Business
  • Health and Physical Education
  • Education

7

Medaille College

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Admission Requirements:

  • 2.0 GPA
  • Application for admission
  • Proof of high school graduation or GED certificate
  • Submission of official transcripts from all colleges attended
  • An applicant with deficiencies in some of these areas may be offered admission with appropriate evidence supporting the student’s ability to succeed
  • Admission Rate: 75%
  • Grad Rate: 37%
  • Average Annual Cost: $11,664
  • Medical Assisting
  • Business
  • Psychology
  • Biology
  • Criminal Justice

8

North Carolina State University at Raleigh

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Admission Requirements:

  • 2.0 GPA
  • Application for admission
  • Proof of high school diploma or GED certificate
  • Official transcripts from all colleges attended
  • An applicant with poor grades may be offered admission with appropriate evidence supporting the student’s ability to succeed
  • Admission Rate: 51%
  • Grad Rate: 77%
  • Average Annual Cost: $15,024
  • Business
  • Textile Sciences
  • Biology
  • Communication and Media Studies
  • Electrical, Electronics and Communications Engineering

9

Texas A & M International University

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Admission Requirements:

  • 2.0 GPA
  • Complete Application for Admission.
  • Official High School Transcript showing rank in class or official GED passing scores.
  • Official college transcripts sent directly from each ichool attended. If any college credit has been earned. A minimum overall grade point average of 2.00 is required.    
  • Admission Rate: 50%
  • Grad Rate: 50%
  • Average Annual Cost: $4,884
  • Criminal Justice
  • Psychology
  • Business
  • Interdisciplinary Studies
  • Nursing

10

University of Houston – Clear Lake

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Admission Requirements:

  • 2.0 GPA
  • Submit Application
  • Send Transcripts
  • Send your SAT and ACT scores
  • Admission Rate: 72%
  • Grad Rate: 73%
  • Average Annual Cost: $13,055
  • Interdisciplinary Studies
  • Psychology
  • Accounting
  • Business
  • Health and Physical Education

11

University of Maine

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Admission Requirements:

  • 2.0 GPA
  • Essay
  • Final high school transcript or HISET or GED
  • SAT or ACT Test Scores
  • Admission Rate: 92%
  • Grad Rate: 59%
  • Average Annual Cost: $17,074
  • Business
  • Mechanical Engineering
  • Education
  • Psychology
  • Finance

12

University of Maine at Fort Kent

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Admission Requirements:

  • 2.0 GPA
  • Completed application form
  • School Counselor (or teacher) letter of recommendation (If you are a current high school graduate)
  • Official high school transcripts or official GED score report
  • Official college transcripts (if you completed any college work)
  • Admission Rate: 97%
  • Grad Rate: 54%
  • Average Annual Cost: $12,228
  • Nursing
  • Business
  • Criminal Justice
  • Forestry
  • Social Sciences

13

West Texas A & M University

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Admission Requirements:

  • 2.0 GPA
  • One of the following Class Rank & ACT / SAT Score combos:
    Top 25% with no minimum ACT/SAT score
    26%-50% with 18 ACT or 960 SAT
    51%-75% with 21 ACT or 1060
    SAT 76%-100% with 23 ACT or 1130 SAT
  • Students may also be admitted solely on test scores* if they achieve the following scores:
    Official SAT Scores: at least 480 for EBRW and 530 for Math
    Official ACT scores: at least 18 English, 22 Reading, 22 Mathematics and 23 Science
  • Admission Rate: 61%
  • Grad Rate: 50%
  • Average Annual Cost: $14,916
  • Nursing
  • Business
  • Criminal Justice
  • Forestry
  • Social Sciences

Colleges that accept 2.5 GPA

These seven colleges may accept low 2.5 GPAs

1

ECPI University

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Admission Requirements:

  • Students must have a GPA of 2.5 or higher on a four point scale.
  • Transfers are accepted by ECPI University into a specific program that aligns with the VCCS’s associate’s degree program.
  • Admission Rate: 71%
  • Grad Rate: 52%
  • Average Annual Cost: $20,327
  • Medical Assisting
  • Nursing Assistant
  • Nursing
  • Information Technology
  • Culinary Arts

2

Embry – Riddle Aeronautical University Worldwide

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Admission Requirements:

Applicants age 20 and older who are not classified as a transfer student or have not served in the US military must provide the following:

  • Official high school transcript or equivalent (GED®, HiSET® or TASC®) with a 2.5 unweighted GPA or higher on a 4.0 scale
  • Official transcripts from all colleges attended, with a minimum of a 2.0 CGPA on a 4.0 scale
  • Resume
  • Admission Rate: 63%
  • Grad Rate: 33%
  • Average Annual Cost: $19,648
  • Air Transportation
  • Business Administration
  • Vehicle Maintenance
  • Mechanical Engineering
  • Homeland Security

3

Endicott College

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Admission Requirements:

  • Review by an Admission Committee
  • a GPA of at least 2.5
  • Admission Rate: 81%
  • Grad Rate: 72%
  • Average Annual Cost: $34,571
  • Nursing
  • Business
  • Health and Physical Education
  • Hospitality
  • Education

4

Grace Christian University

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Admission Requirements:

  • Holistic Admission Process
  • 20 ACT OR 940 SAT
  • 2.5 GPA
  • Admission Rate: 81%
  • Grad Rate: 72%
  • Average Annual Cost: $34,571
  • Pastoral Counseling
  • Human Services
  • Business
  • Bible Studies
  • Music

5

University of Southern Indiana

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Admission Requirements:

  • GPA of 2.5 on a 4.0 scale
  • Students age 24+ must have had a 2.0 cumulative high school GPA
  • Composite SAT score of a 900 OR Composite ACT score of a 17
  • Students age 21+ are not required to submit an SAT or ACT score
  • Admission Rate: 94%
  • Grad Rate: 44%
  • Average Annual Cost: $13,319
  • Nursing
  • Health Administration
  • Business
  • Education
  • Health and Physical Education

6

Southern New Hampshire University

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Admission Requirements:

  • Completed Application 
  • Transcript Release
  • Electronic Attestation Form, stating that you’ve graduated from high school or received your GED
  • Admission Rate: 78%
  • Grad Rate: 69%
  • Average Annual Cost: $40,617
  • Business
  • Psychology
  • Liberal Arts
  • Nursing
  • Accounting

Colleges that accept 3.0 GPA

Here are some examples of colleges that accept students with a 3.0 GPA and above.

1

Bloomsburg University of Pennsylvania

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Admission Requirements:

  • 3.0 GPA
  • Completed college prep curriculum in high school
  • Average test score: SAT: 1050-1090; ACT: 23 (Nursing: 1180 SAT, 24 ACT)
  • Top 30% of graduating class
  • Active in high school, community, and leadership activities
  • Admission Rate: 73%
  • Grad Rate: 64%
  • Average Annual Cost: $18,796
  • Business
  • Criminal Justice
  • Public Relations
  • Nursing
  • Psychology

2

Lamar University

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Admission Requirements:

  • 3.5 GPA
  • Top 25% of class
  • SAT Scores: Critical Reading: 480 – 580, Math: 470 – 560
  • ACT: 18 – 23
  • Admission Rate: 82%
  • Grad Rate: 39%
  • Average Annual Cost: $12,941
  • Nursing
  • Interdisciplinary Studies
  • Liberal Arts
  • Criminal Justice
  • Communication

3

Mesivtha Tifereth Jerusalem of America

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Admission Requirements:

  • 3.5 GPA
  • Top 25% of class
  • SAT Scores: Critical Reading: 480 – 580, Math: 470 – 560
  • ACT: 18 – 23
  • Admission Rate: 82%
  • Grad Rate: 39%
  • Average Annual Cost: $12,941
  • Nursing
  • Interdisciplinary Studies
  • Liberal Arts
  • Criminal Justice
  • Communication

4

The College of Westchester

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Admission Requirements:

  • 3.0 GPA
  • Completed college prep curriculum in high school
  • Acceptance Rate: 98%
  • Grad Rate: 44%
  • Average Annual Cost: $17,237
  • Business
  • Medical Assisting
  • Health and Medical Administration
  • Information Technology

5

University of Minnesota – Twin Cities

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Admission Requirements:

  • A minimum GPA of 3.0 for transfer student
  • Completed, or in progress, 26 or more post-secondary credits.
  • Acceptance Rate: 50%
  • Grad Rate: 79%
  • Average Annual Cost: $17,396
  • Psychology
  • Economic
  • Computer Science
  • Biology
  • Journalism

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Accounting vs Finance Degree Programs

Comparing a degree program in accounting vs finance could hold significant importance. Beyond the role of an accountant, an accounting career might encompass broader aspects, including engagement with financial planning. Notably, accounting majors can diverge significantly from their finance counterparts, which possess an equal allure for certain individuals.

Within the realm of business degrees, finance and accounting are two distinctive components, each bearing its unique traits. Both, however, bestow considerable value upon those who pursue them, ultimately aiming to enhance a company’s operational efficiency. Moreover, some of these programs also delve into the realm of personal finance management.

Accounting often exhibits a laser-like focus, honing in on specific financial facets, while finance casts a wider net, addressing a broader array of topics. Many students find merit in exploring elements from both these domains, crafting an educational experience that aligns with their career aspirations. It’s imperative to assess your specific job prospects and career ambitions, and this examination of the distinctions between accounting and finance degree paths can guide you toward achieving your goals.

Accounting Degree Programs

The essence of accounting degree programs lies in their emphasis on mathematics and numerical proficiency. These programs often encompass the realms of financial reporting and risk management through data analysis. Accountants play a pivotal role in the collection and meticulous organization of data, while others within this field are more inclined to decipher the implications of that data.

Such degrees in accounting serve as foundational platforms for a multitude of specialized careers. Frequently, they involve the intricate analysis of data, leveraging financial information to assess a company’s fiscal well-being. This extends to areas like bookkeeping, as well as more advanced functions such as crafting balance sheets and income statements, even encompassing the dynamics of cash flow.

In the pursuit of this field, you’ll find yourself delving into historical records and utilizing real-time reports to construct this invaluable data. Accounting programs often center on the creation of information, distinguishing them from their finance counterparts. This meticulously crafted information plays a crucial role in upholding accountability and significantly shapes a company’s decision-making processes.

Many types of accounting degree programs exist. You may want to consider more than one. Some options include these:

  • (BAcc) Bachelor of Accountancy
  • (BA or ACC) Bachelor of Arts in Accounting
  • Bachelor of Science in Accounting

Many may start pursuing work with a bachelor’s degree. You may go further. You may spend several more years learning. Some of the grad program options include these:

  • Master of Accounting (MAcc)
  • Master of Science in Accounting (MSA)

Students may learn the basics of the degree they choose. Then, they may choose a concentration that interests them. They may also choose electives. This may give you more room to expand your degree. You may even take some finance courses.

Finance Degree Programs

A finance degree stands notably apart from its accounting counterpart. Tailored to individuals seeking diverse career avenues, this degree proffers its assistance across a spectrum of professions—spanning the realms of banking and consultancy. Finance programs pivot towards the art of making astute investment decisions. In this arena, practitioners adeptly wield data to shape and substantiate choices, facilitating enterprises in cultivating profitability and often architecting strategies for robust expansion.

Within these programs lies a critical task—scrutinizing and deciphering information and data. This endeavor encompasses a meticulous evaluation, ascertaining the sagacious employment of funds. Consequently, the role extends to guiding enterprises toward strategic alterations. The process involves the craft of devising success-fostering strategies, frequently rooted in the bedrock of accountancy data.

Finance majors chart a specialized course that distinctly diverges from their accounting counterparts. Their focal point revolves around the universe of investments, which may encompass the intricate domain of stock ventures. Alternatively, some channel their energies into the intricate landscape of financial analysis tailored for corporate entities.

There are typically several finance degree program options. Consider a few different ones. Choose that which applies to the work you want to do.

  • (BA/F) Bachelor of Arts in Finance
  • (BSc/F) Bachelor of Science in Finance

You may go on to a grad degree. Many students do this. It helps them focus their education. You may need to do this for some positions. It may provide more advanced education. Some of the grad school options include:

  • (MSF) Master of Science in Finance
  • (M.Fin) Master of Finance
  • (MAF) Master of Applied Finance
  • (MFE) Master of Financial Economics

Accounting vs Finance Degree Programs

Finance vs. accounting degree programs may be very different. Higher education may help you meet your goals in either field. Concentrations matter. Take a look at this chart. It shows some of the differences you may expect. Which degree path is best for you?

ProgramsAccountingFinance
Designed ForStudents who are looking to become accountantsStudents looking to get into the field of finance
CoursesAccounting, Cost Accounting, Accounting Information SystemsIntroduction to Corporate Finance, Investment Analysis and Management, Financial Management
Career Path OptionsCertified Pubic Accountant, Government Accountant, Internal AuditorCredit Analyst, Finance Officer, Financial Advisor, Financial Planner
CertificationsCertified Public Accountant (CPA), Certified Management Accountant (CMA), Certified Internal Auditor (CIA)Certified Financial Analyst (CFA), Certified Financial Services Auditor (CFSA)

Which Degree Program May Be Perfect for You?

There are many options. Finding one perfect for you may be a challenge. You may love math. You may love people. Some in this field may enjoy creating financial goals. Others might like managing finances. Both fields may offer some of the same skills.

You may do well in accounting in some cases. Do you like to work numbers? Do you enjoy spending a lot of time on data? You may want to help companies manage their budget. You may also be interested in tax careers. This field is likely to be very analytical. It’s typically all about gathering data and organizing it. You may do well here if you are a critical thinker. And, you may also do well if you like to solve problems.

You may wish to focus on financing in other cases. You may like to find solutions. Or, you may like to see companies succeed. You may want to work with people more than books. And, you appreciate the math, but may be more focused on results. You might like to plan and create strategies. Or, you may be interested in economics. You may want to work in areas of investment. You may want to help start businesses.

What about your skills?

Accounting degree programs typically focus heavily on math and statistics. You might need to be willing to learn accounting methods. And, you may also need to be interested in following rules for compliance. You may also be the type of person that likes to interpret data. Or, you may learn skills in accounting principles that are complex. You don’t mind a challenge in that way.

The skills you need in finance are usually a bit different vs an accounting degree. You may need more critical thinking skills. You may also have to be able to make decisions. And, you may love to research and communicate with others. Many have theoretical knowledge. They are typically analytical people. You also may need to voice your opinion. Some in this field may teach others. They may offer insight into problems. They may develop strategies by thinking outside of the box.

It’s also important to think about your goals. Choose a career path first. Consider what type of business you want to work in. Think about the day to day work you may do. Accountants spend a lot of time with computer software. They analyze data. Those in finance spend more time with people. They deal with meetings. They may need to use technology to develop insights.

What may you pursue with an accounting degree?

Accounting degree outcomes may be numerous. Many pursue work with a bachelor’s degree. You may want to go further. A grad degree may be important to some people. Some degrees might require a special license or certification. That is true of becoming a certified public accountant. You may need more training to be a chartered accountant.

Are taxes interesting to you? If so, a career in tax is possible. You may need a certification. You may work in tax firms. And, you may also do taxes for companies. Some own private businesses.

International accounting is another area. You may want to help companies grow across borders. You may work in insurance companies. There, you may help with insurance claims. Government agencies hire accountants, too. They typically use them to balance finances. You may do this at a local, state, or federal level.

Your accounting degree may include a focus on working in a business. In this case, you may take sales data and record it. You may use software to manage it. You may track profits. Or, you may track expenses. You may help with ensuring accuracy in a company’s books. This may include balancing financial statements from banks.

What may you pursue with a finance degree?

Many people with a finance degree typically have a concentration. This may include corporate finance. It might be financial regulation. Some may work in areas such as behavioral finance. Financing modeling is likely another area. There may be many others.

Are you interested in helping to create money and build wealth? Finance degrees may focus on the “doing” part of business. Those in this job make decisions. They may also educate those who make decisions.

Most financing undergrad degrees focus on one area. Post grad degrees let students get more focus. They may want to work in banking. Some may work in financial engineering. Still others might focus on financial planning. The choice is yours.

The key is choosing the perfect finance degree. Consider the type of work you plan to do. You may do well in this field when you like creating plans. You may do well if you like to analyze data.

Courses

The courses you take for any program could help you prepare for your future job. There is some overlap in these courses. Here is a look at some of the courses you may take in accounting vs finance degree programs.

Common Accounting Courses

Accounting Information Systems

This is the study of business structure. You may learn how to collect and process data. You may learn about auditing. This course typically aims to focus on creating business reports. These skills help accountants gather data and make it usable.

Principles of Accounting

The principles of accounting tend to focus on several types of rules for accounting. This may include things like cost principle. It may include time period principle. You may learn more advanced concepts in a second course.

Cost Accounting

Cost accounting is a type of managerial accounting. It aims to focus on the cost of producing. Businesses use this info to make decisions. They also use it to determine profits. It may help companies improve costs and manage goals.

Corporate Taxation

This type of course typically aims to teach students about corporate tax. Corporate taxation is usually for federal tax reporting. It often teaches fundamentals. The focus may be on business taxes. Students may learn about the history and laws about taxes.

Common Finance Courses

Financial Statement Analysis

A financial statement analysis course may focus on reading statements. These are business documents. Students may learn to create them as well. It may teach what they are. It also may teach how to use data in decision making. Students may explore a variety of topics related to creating statements. This may include profit and loss.

Financial Markets and Institutions

A Financial Markets and Institutions course aims to teach about financial assets and markets. It often discusses the role of these areas in the economy. Students may learn about what financial markets are. They may explore concepts like levels of interest rates. They may also explore economy related skills.

Risk and Insurance

A course in risk management and insurance like this typically focuses on decision making. Students may learn how to identify risk. They then may learn how to mitigate it. That may be through the use of insurance products. Students may learn how to apply risk to financials. That includes for decision making.

Intermediate Corporate Finance

An intermediate corporate finance course may expand on finance skills. Students may learn topics related to business finance. This may includes using tools to manage this info. Students may learn about making business decisions. They may learn about working capital management. Many may take courses in multinational finance. This course often follows basic or intro programs.

Career Path Options

Degree programs may be important. You may need to know what degree and coursework is best for the career you hope to have. You may want to work in finance careers. And, you may be after a career path in accounting.

Employers may need people in both fields. Managing money and data is not easy to do. Software helps this. Yet, educated pros may make a difference for many companies. Many organizations need these professionals. That includes companies of all sizes. It also includes nonprofit organizations. Some work in government agencies.

Many types of companies may use both of these services. That includes banks. Building companies, insurance companies, and retailers as well. You may work in the public sector. You may work in an investment company.

And, you may use these skills to start your own company. This may take time. It may also help to have a more advanced degree to reach that goal.

Unsure where to start? Consider what type of work interests you. Think about your perfect job. Do some research. What type of education do you need? Which skills are important? Then, consider the details. That includes how much you may make. It also includes the demand for a job like you want.

Take a look at some of the jobs you may have in the United States. The information here comes from the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS).

Accounting Sample Career Paths

With an accounting degree, you may qualify for jobs such as the following.

Accountants

An accountant typically works to prepare financial records. They may work in businesses. Some have their own firm. They gather and manage financial information. This may include verifying accuracy. It may include examining accounting methods. They may work for banks. Some work for tax firms.

2023 Median Pay: $79,880
Job Outlook: 6% 

Bookkeeping Clerk

An bookkeeping clerk often works in companies. They provide bookkeeping services. They may also provide auditing services. Some provide basic accounting services. They help to produce financial records. They also verify accuracy in accounting. This includes looking over the financial books. They may help make decisions in financial matters.

2023 Median Pay: $47,440
Job Outlook: 5% decline

Tax Examiners and Collectors, and Revenue Agents

Tax Examiners and Collectors, and Revenue Agents typically work for government agencies. They may be tax examiners. Some work as tax collectors. Others may work as revenue agents. They may work to verify tax forms and records. They may also determine taxes owed. And, they might work with individuals and companies to collect taxes. These professionals may work for the United States federal government.

2023 Median Pay: $58,530 
Job Outlook: 7% decline

Financial Manager

financial manager is typically a  type of financial manager. You may work with direct investment activities. Some may develop investment plans for companies. Some may help to establish financial goals for businesses. They may often create financial reports. They may gather insights and make recommendations based on data. Many also help minimize risks. They may work for banks. Some might work within businesses. Others could work in insurance companies. Investment firms often hire controllers as well.

2023 Median Pay: $156,100
Job Outlook: 17%

Top Executive

Top Executive may be a Chief Financial Officer or (CFO). Their job typically focuses on financial strategy planning. They use data from the company’s books to make decisions and may develop financial goals. They may also create policies for reaching those goals. Some create financial strategies. They are an important role in many organizations. That includes smaller companies, too.

2023 Median Pay: $103,840 
Job Outlook: 6%

Budget Analyst

budget analyst typically help  to organize finances. They could work with public and private companies. They may help create a budget. Or, they may look at existing budgets to improve them. They may also work to pinpoint concerns. They are usually a valuable component of many companies. Some may work in universities. Others might work for nonprofit organizations. Some work in government agencies as well.

2023 Median Pay: $84,940
Job Outlook: 3%

Finance Sample Career Paths

Finance careers are numerous. They include these career path options.

Financial Analyst

financial analyst typically gathers information and develops reports. They may often work to create long term goals for companies. Some might work with individuals. They often create direct investment activities. Many spend time working to create financial strategies for people. They analyze trends. Many work in executive positions.,

2023 Median Pay: $99,010
Job Outlook: 9%

Financial Advisor

financial advisor typically works with people to manage their finances. Some may help people to plan their financial future. They may help them make investment decisions. They may help with asset management. Some might help with debt management. They may work in the insurance industry as well. Some may have their own business. Others might work in a private organization. Many work in financial investment firms.

2023 Median Pay: $99,580 
Job Outlook: 15%

Loan Officer

loan officer typically works in banks. Some could work with third party lenders. They usually evaluate loan applications. They may often authorize the lending of money to a person or business. And, they often recommend approval. They may gather data to do this. That includes application info. They may seek out credit scores. Loan officers may work for many types of lenders. This includes banks and credit unions. It may include mortgage companies. Some work in commercial banks.

2023 Median Pay: $69,990
Job Outlook: 4%

Securities Officers

securities officer may also be called a financial services agent. These individuals typically work to sell investments. They may work with individuals. Some may work within financial markets. They may deal with commodities. Some might work in financial organizations. Many work in financial investment companies.

2023 Median Pay: $76,900
Job Outlook: 10%

Financial Managers

financial manager usually work in investment firms. They may concentrate in stocks and investment strategies. They typically help companies develop financial reports. Also, they might create direct investment goals. Many may develop strategies for building finances for the business. They may work in banks or insurance companies as well.

2023 Median Pay: $156,100 
Job Outlook: 17%

Certifications

Sometimes, you may benefit from a certification. These show you have specific skills in an area of focus.

Some accounting certificates that may help you include:

  • Certified public bookkeeper
  • (CIA) Certified internal auditor
  • (CPA) Certified public accountant
  • (CMA) Certified management accountant

Some finance specific certificates may help you, such as:

  • (CFF) Certified in financial forensics
  • (CFA) Certified financial analyst
  • (CFE) Certified fraud examiner
  • Certified tax preparer
  • Enrolled agent

This is an offer for educational opportunities that may lead to employment and not an offer or guarantee of employment and that may help prepare students to meet the certification requirements of the field they choose to study. Students should check with the appropriate certifying body to make sure the program they apply to will help meet any certification requirements. Students should also consult with a representative from the school they select to learn more about career opportunities in that field. Program outcomes vary according to each institution’s specific program curriculum.

Business Majors in College

Many business majors in college exist. You may wish to learn to run a business. You may want to learn how to operate a specific area of business. Majoring in business in college is a common path. Some people may minor in this area, too. You may wish to choose an area that appeals to you. Then, work on earning a degree in it.

Business majors hold significant value for numerous companies. They play a pivotal role in recruiting and nurturing talented individuals who contribute to a company’s expansion. Your involvement could extend to strategic decision-making, leveraging critical thinking skills to mitigate potential risks. Specific roles might include financial management, personnel supervision, or product-focused responsibilities. 

Navigating this multitude of options can indeed pose challenges. To facilitate your decision-making, explore various business majors available in college. Opt for the one that aligns with your intrinsic passion and resonates with the potential tasks you’d undertake in that field. Consider your affinity for working with people, your interest in sales, or your inclination towards quantitative disciplines like mathematics. 

The range of options is expansive, reflecting the versatility of degree programs. These programs empower you to tailor your academic journey to your preferences. Let’s delve into an overview of some common types of business majors offered in college. 

Types of Business Degree Programs

Choosing the right degree to pursue in the realm of business offers a multitude of options. The selection of your degree hinges on various factors, often encompassing employer expectations and the value of practical experience. Here is a look at the various options you may wish to choose to pursue. 

Associate Degree in Business

Consider an AAS or AS, as a potential choice. An associate degree commonly marks the starting point of your educational journey. Within a span of two years, you can attain this degree, although some programs might have a shorter duration. Certain programs of this kind might be fully conducted online, while others could be accessible through local community colleges. These courses are typically foundational in nature, covering a range of subjects from broad to specific aspects of the business realm. This specialization often equips you with the skills to perform distinct business functions. 

An additional motive for pursuing an associates degree in business could arise if you’re uncertain about your preferred business domain. Some of these degrees encompass a comprehensive curriculum, providing insights into various segments of business, including accounting, business law, and leadership skills. This diverse exposure assists in identifying your areas of interest. It’s not uncommon for individuals to pursue a bachelor’s degree subsequent to completing an AAS, thereby gaining a clearer understanding of their optimal business focus. 

Associates degrees usually have a shorter duration, rendering them more cost-effective compared to traditional four-year programs. For many students, this presents an opportunity to mitigate educational expenses. Furthermore, there’s the potential for earned credits to be transferrable to other educational institutions. However, it’s essential to confirm this aspect prior to finalizing your decision. Should this be the case, it can significantly contribute to obtaining a more advanced degree while minimizing financial outlay. 

There are various types of associates degrees in business. Some examples of areas you may wish to explore include these.

  • Introduction to Human Resources
  • Customer Service Skills
  • Intro to Taxation
  • Business Analysis and Intelligence
  • Intro to Finance

You may be able to use this to help you work in administrative positions in companies. Some work in assistant management positions. Others work in sales support positions. Some go on to start their own business. Many may pursue more advanced degrees.

Is an AAS or AS Best?

An applied associate of science degree is a foundation program. It typically covers business principles. It could also help develop entry level skills. An associate of science focuses on general education courses. It may include business admin basis.

Bachelor of Business Administration

You may have more options at this level. That includes a Bachelor of Business Administration. It may also include a Bachelor of Science in Business Administration. Some also may take a Bachelor of Arts in Business Administration.

Many bachelor degrees include general courses. They also may included advanced courses. This may include areas of math or English. These are skills many may need for business and a business major in college. Many offer electives. This lets a student concentrate. It may help them take courses they are interested in. Then, many may have a concentration focus. This may include a specific area of student. It may include business law. For some, it may include operations management. These programs typically take four years to complete.

The combination of these skills may help a person be valuable to a company. They also need soft skills. Many bachelor’s programs help with this. They may teach communication skills. They may teach critical thinking skills. Many may also teach leadership. These are often important in the business environment as well. These often are specific to the area of study. Those in operations or admin positions may benefit from strategic thinking. Others may need strong math skills.

Many bachelor’s degree programs may also offer other opportunities. This may include internships in companies. These may help students gain real world skills. Othersmay  offer case projects. Some may have capstone projects. Others may have apprenticeships.

Students could learn a great deal in a bachelor’s degree. They may use it to explore topics such as:

  • Business Formation
  • Business Law
  • Managing People
  • Business Finance
  • Business Marketing
  • Research and Development

Some may work in business management positions. Others may use their degree to start their own business. Some may go on to pursue more advanced education.

What’s the Difference in BBA, BSBA, and BABA?

A BBA is a broader focus. Classes may include marketing and economics. A BSBA has a more math focused curriculum. A BABA is more liberal arts focused. It may include more human management courses.

Master of Business Administration

A Master of Science in Business Administration is one option. A Master of Arts in Business Administration is another. The key to these business majors in college is that they tend to be very concentrated. Students may learn advanced skills in key areas of focus. Master’s programs tend to take two years to complete. Some are available online.

There are many options. Students may focus on areas such as:

  • Business Law
  • Economics
  • Human Resources
  • Finance

Students may work in areas such as supply chain management. Others may work as financial advisors. Some could also work as a financial analyst or in consulting fields. Others may work in areas of financial development. Others may want to move into related areas. This may include healthcare or product development.

Some students go on. They may earn a doctoral degree. It provides an even higher level of focus. Students may concentrate in this program. They may attend another 18 months to 2 years to complete this advanced education.

Different Types of Business Majors in College

Which business majors in college are perfect for you? A bachelor’s degree is typically the first step. You may be able to go to a business school. You may go to a traditional college with business majors. The decision making process may be hard. Here are some programs to consider. You may be able to get started on this degree right after high school.

Accounting Degree

An accounting degree often applies to many positions. Some may pursue a career as an accountant. These professionals could work in finance fields. They may work in a public or private company. This type of business degree may be a major or minor. Some may take this program as a part of a humane resource degree. Others likely take it with a business administration degree. Grad students may take it as part of a Master of Business Administration (MBA) program. Accounting majors may be very specific. They could be general, too.

Courses:

  • Intermediate Accounting
  • Cost Management
  • Federal Income Tax
  • Auditing
  • Business Law
  • Information Systems
  • General Business Management

Potential Career Paths: Accounting Consultant, Auditor
2023 Median Pay: $79,880 
2022-32 Job Outlook: 4% 
2022-32 Jobs Available: 1.54 million

Advertising Degree

An advertising degree aims to teach students how to help market and sell products or services. Students may work in public relations. Some may work in advertising or marketing in private firms. In a bachelor’s degree in advertising, students s may develop critical skills. They may need strategic thinking. They could learn about mass communication. Some may learn journalism. You may take this program as part of other business degrees as well. Some students may minor in it. They may major in business law or public relations.

Courses:

  • Media Planning
  • Creative Strategy
  • Research
  • Media Planning
  • Law and ethics
  • Advertising campaigns

Potential Career Paths: Copywriter, Production Coordinator, Creative Director, Marketing Manager
2023 Median Pay: $156,580 
2022-32 Job Outlook: 6% 
2022-32 Jobs Available: 389,000

Economics Degree

An economics degree may help you take part in the world of finance. Some people work for companies. Others may work for government agencies. They may help with decision making for investments. An economics degree often leads to working as an economist. Some people major in this field. This usually requires at least a bachelor’s degree. A master’s degree is often necessary for many jobs. This field is typically math based. Students may spend time learning about predicting outcomes. They may study business on a global scale.

Courses:

  • Microeconomics
  • Macroeconomics
  • Applied Econometrics
  • Game Theory
  • Principles of Economics
  • Microeconomics

Potential Career Paths: Economist
2023 Median Pay: $115,730 
2022-32 Job Outlook: 6% 
2022-32 Jobs Available: 17,600

Entrepreneurship Degree

An entrepreneurship degree  may be a varied program. It is not just for those who want to start a business. It could also help those who wish to work in business management. Often, it aims to teach about business development. It could help you learn how to start a business. It may focus on growing a company. And, it may bring together many of the business topics in one program. This may include marketing. It may include business law.

Courses:

  • Entrepreneurial Marketing
  • Entrepreneurial Finance
  • Entrepreneurship and the Startup Methods
  • Entrepreneurship and Society

Potential Career Paths: Business Consultant, Recruiter, Management Analyst
2023 Median Pay: $99,410
2022-32 Job Outlook: 10% 
2022-32 Jobs Available: 987,600

Finance Degree

Every business may need to manage money. A finance degree could help you learn how. This is a broad degree. Many people may concentrate in it through a master’s program. It typically aims to provide students with financial knowledge in various areas. Some students may focus in investment management. They may help make investment decisions. Others may turn to banking. Corporate financial analysis is likely another area. Global finance may interest some. Risk management is another area. Students interested in finance may have many career path options. Finance majors may range widely.

Courses:

  • Foundations of Managed Care
  • Business Project Management
  • International Healthcare
  • Asset Management
  • Financial accounting
  • Fixed Income Securities
  • Financial Management

Potential Career Paths: Clinical Director, Medical Records Manager, Office Manager
2023 Median Pay: $156,100
2022-32 Job Outlook: 16% 
2022-32 Jobs Available: 792,600

Hospitality Management Degree

hospitality management degree is one often focused on teaching people how to help others. Those with this degree often work in hotels. They may work in casino management. Some also may work in food service management. They may learn about helping people to enjoy their experience. Some also may learn marketing. They may learn social media marketing. Many learn operations management. They may learn to run a hotel in many areas.

Courses:

  • Housekeeping Management
  • Hotel Front Office Management
  • Hotel Convention Sales and Services
  • Hospitality and Tourism Law
  • Leadership in Hospitality

Potential Career Paths: Travel Agent, Travel Attendant, Lodging Manager
2023 Median Pay: $65,360
2022-32 Job Outlook: 7% 
2022-32 Jobs Available: 50,800

Human Resources Degree

human resources degree is a business degree. Some students may earn a B.A. in it. They may work as human resource professionals. Others may take human resources coursework to work in other business degrees. A B.S. in Human Resource Management is one path. Students may learn how to hire employees. They may learn how to build relationships in teams and may also ensure companies meet ethical requirements. They may use business data and aim to provide education to employees. And, they may help make business decisions.

Courses:

  • Human Resources Management
  • Principles of Management
  • Human Resource Strategy and Development
  • Total Rewards
  • Business Operations

Potential Career Paths: Human Resource Specialist, Human Resource Manager
2023 Median Pay: $136,350 
2022-32 Job Outlook: 5% 
2022-32 Jobs Available: 191,600

International Business Degree

An international business degree aids in global business development. Students may learn how to market and build business on a global scale. They may learn about management. They may focus on finance. Also, they may learn about growth strategies. Ethics and law are often a component of this program many times. Many students could earn a Master of Science in International Business. Many could also develop analytic degrees. They may learn to make decisions in a business environment. Cultural areas of study may also be important.

Courses:

  • International Finance Management
  • International Marketing
  • Global Supply Chain Strategy
  • Introduction to International Accounting and Finance
  • Managing the Global Enterprise

Potential Career Paths: Management Analyst, Marketing Manager
2023 Median Pay: $99,410
2022-32 Job Outlook: 10% 
2022-32 Jobs Available: 987,600

Management Degrees

Management degrees are a foundation. Many other business majors in college include management. Some people may just earn a bachelor’s in management. Others may go on to learn a master’s. Those who take these programs learn to supervise. They may learn how to manage company assets. They may learn to meet growth expectations. Some learn to use business data. This field may be concentrated. Some may manage finance companies. Others may manage manufacturing companies. Many may work as managers. Others work as CEOs or executives. Some students could have a focus in supply chain management.

Courses:

  • Intermediate Accounting
  • Cost Management
  • Federal Income Tax
  • Auditing
  • Human Resources
  • Business Law
  • Business Ethics

Potential Career Paths: Management Analysts, Accounting Consultant, Auditor
2023 Median Pay: $99,410
2022-32 Job Outlook: 10% 
2022-32 Jobs Available: 987,600

Marketing Degree

Many companies often need to market. This is a way of telling others what products and services are available. A marketing degree could be very valuable. An associate’s degree in marketing is one option. Many students pursue a bachelor’s or master’s degree. Students may learn professional selling. They may learn marketing research. They may learn to use business data. Many students also learn consumer behavior. They may also learn about social media. They may go on to work in marketing firms. Some may own their own business. Others may work in large companies.

Courses:

  • Introduction to Marketing Management
  • Foundations of Professional Sales
  • Marketing Research
  • Consumer Behavior
  • Marketing Strategies
  • Marketing Methodology

Potential Career Paths: Account Executive, Media Planner, Brand Manager
2023 Median Pay: $156,580
2022-32 Job Outlook: 6% 
2022-32 Jobs Available: 389,000

Operations Management Degree

An operations management degree is another business program. Many people may take this program to work as an operations manager. These people could learn how to lead others. They also may oversee operations in companies. This includes the day to day management tasks. It may also include making decisions for the company. They work to manage products and supply chains in some cases. Many may work in manufacturing. Others may work in office settings.

Courses:

  • Systems Innovation
  • Leading the Enterprise
  • Enterprise Planning and Implementation
  • Energy Strategy and Innovation
  • Organizational Leadership
  • Management Information Systems

Potential Career Paths: Compliance Manager, Manufacturing Manager, Office Manager
2023 Median Pay: $75,670
2022-32 Job Outlook: 1.6% 
2022-32 Jobs Available: 359,640

Project Management Degree

project management degree aims to help students learn to manage people and projects. This may include learning to manage projects from the conception through completion. Those with this degree may work as a project manager. They may have to learn to work with people. This may include human resource management classes. They may also learn about decision making. They may have to balance project budgets. And, they may have to develop project plans. Many aim to help company leaders make decisions. They also may watch and control outcomes.

Courses:

  • Applying Leadership Principles
  • Operations Management
  • Assessing and Managing Risk
  • Project Management Tools
  • Procurement and Contracting
  • Project Leadership
  • Assessing and Managing Risk

Potential Career Paths: Construction Manager, Operations Manager
2023 Median Pay: $104,900 
2022-32 Job Outlook: 5% 
2022-32 Jobs Available: 505,800

Public Relations Degree

public relations degree aims to focus on the relationship between a business and the community. Some may work in business. Others may work in government. Students often need a bachelor’s degree to get a job. These degrees sometimes pair with marketing or advertising degrees. Students may learn about media. They often learn about sales language. They may learn about human decision making. And, they may also learn a bit about psychology.

Courses:

  • Public Relations Principles
  • Media Writing
  • Communication Pathways
  • Public Relations Strategies
  • Media Law
  • Theory of Ethics
  • Public Relations Campaigns
  • Persuasion

Potential Career Paths: Marketing Coordinator, Fundraiser, Media Planner
2023 Median Pay: $156,580
2022-32 Job Outlook: 6% 
2022-32 Jobs Available: 389,000

Supply Chain Management Degree

Supply chains aim to help products move from manufacturers to warehouses. They then could help to get them to consumers. A supply chain management degree is of growing importance. More business may be  done online. That may make managing these complex systems so important. Those who get this degree may help with that. That may include procurement of products. It may focus on production. In some areas it could focus on distribution or allocation. Many people work in the delivery aspect. They may learn to manage people. Many may work in high-tech surroundings.

Courses:

  • Principles of Management
  • Business Law
  • Financial Accounting
  • Managerial Accounting
  • Organizational Behavior
  • Integrated Project Management
  • Business Modeling
  • Transportation and Logistics Management

Potential Career Paths: Logistics Manager, Transportation Manager, Logistician
2023 Median Pay: $99,200
2022-32 Job Outlook: 8% 
2022-32 Jobs Available: 127,000

Taxation Degree

taxation degree aims to prepare students to do taxes for individuals. They may also learn to do taxes for businesses. They may learn the current tax code. And, they may also learn accounting skills. Not everyone in taxation has a formal degree. Some may have a certificate. Those with a degree may work in companies. They may provide leadership skills to tax departments. Some own their own business. Others may work within larger tax firms. Some students may also get a finance degree. Some could go on to earn their CPA.

Courses:

  • Tax Research
  • Estate and Gift Taxation
  • Tax Accounting
  • International Taxation
  • Business Law
  • Cost Accounting
  • Finance

Potential Career Paths: Financial Planning Consultant, Certified Public Accountant
2023 Median Pay: $99,580
2022-32 Job Outlook: 13% 
2022-32 Jobs Available: 327,600

Direct Entry MSN Programs for Non Nursing Majors Online

Are you a non-nursing major looking to explore the world of nursing? Consider the availability of direct entry MSN programs online – a potentially perfect fit for you. This option opens doors to pursuing a career you truly love and could be the ideal way to jumpstart your journey in the nursing field. Embrace this opportunity as one of the pathways to enter the fulfilling realm of nursing.

direct-entry-msn-program-ec

What Is a Direct Entry MSN Program?

A direct entry master’s in nursing (MSN) program is for students with a non nursing degree who would like to pursue a career as a registered nurse (RN) or advanced practice nurse (APRN). A direct entry MSN program may be available for non-nursing majors online. These people may wish to work as a registered nurse (RN). Some may want to work as an advanced practice nurse (APRN). APRNs are those who earned their master’s degree. There may be a lot of options in this program. See which ones may work for you.

Does an MSN Need a Nursing Degree?

Some schools may require a nursing degree. Many may need an active nursing license. That may not be the case for all programs. Non nursing students may apply. But, all typically need a bachelor’s degree. This may not need to be in nursing.

What You May Learn in an Online Direct Entry MSN Program

Students may learn a great deal in these direct entry MSN programs for non nursing majors online. That could includes gaining clinical experience. A direct entry master may often provide significant concentration. Students may wish to choose mental health. Others may wish to choose gerontology. Many may also learn skills such as these:

  • Health assessments
  • Clinical leadership
  • Psychiatric eval
  • Forensic nursing

Nursing students typically learn a great deal. They may learn how to provide a safe environment. They may have critical thinking skills. And, they may help to hold leadership roles. Many may have good skills to communicate. They lead decision making. They may provide respectful patient care.

Some courses you may take include these:

  • Pathophysiology
  • Microbiology
  • Pharmacology
  • Leadership
  • Clinical experience
  • Disease prevention

Courses are many. Students may choose which interest them. Some may be  set by the program. Others may be electives. There is typically a lot of room for options. Some students may choose courses that interest them. This may be based on the job they hope to have.

How Long Could It Take to Earn My MSN Degree in a Direct Entry Program?

Direct entry MSN programs for non nursing majors online typically vary. Some may take 15 months to complete. Others could take two years. Part time and full time options usually exist. Accelerated MSN programs may be available. Some programs may need 30 credits. Many typically need 70 to 80. Previous education may play a role in what you take.

How Much Does a Direct Entry MSN Online Program for Non Nursing Majors Typically Cost?

Cost may depend on many factors. School tuition costs typically vary from one area to the next. Concentration areas may help individuals to earn more. These may cost more as well. Based on the type you choose. The cost includes many things. That may include tuition. There are typically lab costs and fees. Students may pay more if they live on campus. Others could  complete an online program. These may be more affordable.

Many may qualify for discounts. This may include scholarships and grants. There may be financing options available. More affordable nursing programs may be available. Some students may receive funds from an employer to cover the costs. Financing may help to cover costs. This ranges. Students may wish to talk to financial counselors for some help.

Could I Earn Both a BSN and MSN Degree as Part of This Program?

Some programs may offer a BSN degree program. This may be available after pre-licensure is met. That happens after the curriculum is complete. Other programs typically do not do this. They likely only provide an MSN. That may be available after completing the whole program. Compare schools. Some may allow for BSN and MSN at the same time. It may be possible to find what you need.

How to Check Accreditation for Direct Entry MSN Programs Online

You may gather info about any school. You must know the facts. Look for a program from the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education. This may be CCNE. Another option is the Accreditation Commission for Education in Nursing. Or, ACEN.

What Could I Pursue with a Direct Entry MSN Online Degree?

Students may typically enter a wide range of career paths. Many choose fields that interest them. This may include careers such as these.

You may aim to become a registered nurse. The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics notes the annual median wage for a registered nurse was $86,070 as of May of 2023.

You may work as a nurse practitioner. The 2023 annual median pay for this field is $129,480 per year as noted by the BLS.

Some students may work as a nurse midwife. This is a growing field. The BLS reports it is growing at 38% through 2022-32. That is much faster than average. The 2023 annual median pay for this field was $129,650 per year. Another career path may typically include a medical and health services manager. Those in this field had a median annual pay of $110,680 in 2023. That’s noted by the BLS.

Online Direct Entry MSN Programs

Take a look at some direct entry MSN programs. These may be available through numerous schools in the U. S. Other options may exist. Choose a program perfect for your needs. Online programs offer flexibility. This is something today’s students may need. Our data comes from the NCES.

1 Azusa Pacific University


Azusa Pacific University typically offers an online program. You may work to become a clinical nurse specialist. This program may teach theory, policy, and bioethics.

Admission Requirements

A grad app is necessary. Students must typically have a bachelor’s degree. It must come from a regionally accredited school. GPA may also be a factor.

Accreditation

WASC Senior College and University Commission

Tuition & Fees

Undergrad: $43,600
Grad: $17,330

Financial Aid

% that get financial aid: 99%

Average amount that is awarded: $27,474

Admission Rate

67%

2 Jacksonville State University


Jacksonville State University typically offers a program that includes emergency management. They may also offer a population health nursing program. There is a nursing education track as well.

Admission Requirements

Students typically must complete a bachelor’s degree. An online app is available for this master’s degree.

Accreditation

Southern Association of Colleges and Schools, Commission on College

Tuition & Fees

Undergrad: $22,716
Grad: In-State $17,640

Financial Aid

% that get financial aid: 100%

Average amount that is awarded: $10,123

Admission Rate

55%

3 Arizona State University


Arizona State University offers a program for grad students. Programs typically include advanced nursing practice. There may be several focuses available. Innovation leadership is one of them.

Admission Requirements

Students must complete an app online. They need to meet the requirements. Letters of recommendation may be necessary. A 3.0 GPA may be needed.

Accreditation

Higher Learning Commission

Tuition & Fees

Undergrad: $32,193
Grad: $26,735

Financial Aid

% that get financial aid: 89%

Average amount that is awarded: $12,381

Admission Rate

86%

4 American Sentinel University


American Sentinel University offers flexible online programs. This typically includes a DNP degree. There are five concentrations for MSN degrees as well. Several learning paths are available.

Admission Requirements

Applicants must meet specific RN education levels. Then, complete the online app. Students with an RN license need to submit info to the school about it.

Accreditation

Distance Education Accrediting Commission, Higher Learning Commission

Tuition & Fees

Undergrad: $10,800
Grad: $6,845

Financial Aid

Students that get financial aid: 133 students

Average amount that is awarded: $2,287

Admission Rate

N/A

5 University of Central Florida


The University of Central Florida offers several MSN programs. This typically includes a nursing and health care simulation program. Another is nurse educator. They may also offer a leadership and management program.

Admission Requirements

Students apply online. Program requirements exist. Students must meet academic minimums.

Accreditation

Southern Association of Colleges and Schools, Commission on Colleges

Tuition & Fees

Undergrad: $22,467
Grad: 28,657

Financial Aid

% that get financial aid: 93%

Average amount that is awarded: $9,986

Admission Rate

44%

6 University of Florida


MSN students may choose from several programs at the University of Florida. An MSN to DNP program is one option. Online programs may be available for several nursing field degrees.

Admission Requirements

Grad students need to fill out an application online.. Limited spots are available. Students may need letters of recommendation to qualify.

Accreditation

Southern Association of Colleges and Schools, Commission on Colleges

Tuition & Fees

Undergrad: Out-State $28,659; In-State $6,381
Grad: In-State $12,737; Out-State $30,130 

Financial Aid

% that get financial aid: 92%

Average amount that is awarded: $10,555

Admission Rate

23%

7 Clayton State University


Clayton State University offers a direct access MSN program. This typically includes a family nurse practitioner program. Other focuses may include geriatric and pediatric fields.

Admission Requirements

Prerequisites apply to most course options. There is an online app. Test scores and transcripts are necessary.

Accreditation

Southern Association of Colleges and Schools, Commission on Colleges

Tuition & Fees

Undergrad: $15,790
Grad: $12,625

Financial Aid

% that get financial aid: 99%

Average amount that is awarded: $8,529

Admission Rate

51%

8 Brenau University


Brenau University offers a flexible MSN program. That typically includes a family nurse practitioner program. Leadership and management is another option. You may obtain a Master of Science in Nursing online.

Admission Requirements

Students must meet prerequisites. They apply online. Transcripts are necessary. RNs with a license must provide info on that.

Accreditation

Southern Association of Colleges and Schools, Commission on Colleges

Tuition & Fees

Undergrad: $33,275
Grad: $14,552

Financial Aid

% that get financial aid: 97%

Average amount that is awarded: $20,924

Admission Rate

87%

9 Illinois State University


Illinois State University typically offers an MSN path. This is through the Mennonite College of Nursing. It offers a BSN to DNP program as well.

Admission Requirements

GPA is one component of the app process. Students need letters of recommendation. They need to complete a full grad application.

Accreditation

Higher Learning Commission

Tuition & Fees

Undergrad: 28,086
Grad: 12,646

Financial Aid

% that get financial aid: 97%

Average amount that is awarded: $11,619

Admission Rate

82%

10 Ball State University


Ball State University offers a Master of Science in Nursing. This includes a nurse educator path. Family nurse practitioner (FNP) is another route. Nurse administrator is a third option.

Admission Requirements

Getting started requires an online app. Students need to meet prerequisite courses. Essays and letters of rec may be required.

Accreditation

Higher Learning Commission

Tuition & Fees

Undergrad: 28,766
Grad: 29,196

Financial Aid

% that get financial aid: 97%

Average amount that is awarded: $11,418

Admission Rate

69%

11 Briar Cliff University


Students may study a nurse practitioner program at Briar Cliff University. This program typically offers a psychiatric mental health nurse practitioner (PMHN).. Adult and gerontology is another option.

Admission Requirements

Applicants apply online. The college of nursing offers limited applicants. Course history and transcripts play a role in this.

Accreditation

Higher Learning Commission

Tuition & Fees

Undergrad: $35,534
Grad: $9,366

Financial Aid

% that get financial aid: 99%

Average amount that is awarded: $26,614

Admission Rate

Open

12 Northern Kentucky University


The master’s program at Northern Kentucky University is a fully online program. Part time and full time options may exist. Students in the nursing profession may apply. Concentration in microbiology is an option.

Admission Requirements

Students with a license may apply. Online applications are available. NCLEX-RN recognition is available.

Accreditation

Southern Association of Colleges and Schools, Commission on Colleges

Tuition & Fees

Undergrad: 21,480
Grad: 16,044

Financial Aid

% that get financial aid: 100%

Average amount that is awarded: $11,275

Admission Rate

86%

13 Andrews University


The Andrews University School of Nursing offers an online program. This typically includes BSN pre-licensure. A DNP option may be available. There may also an available RN-BSN online program.

Admission Requirements

Students apply online. The nursing school requires prerequisites based on program selection. GPA plays a role.

Accreditation

Higher Learning Commission

Tuition & Fees

Undergrad:$33,710
Grad: $28,440

Financial Aid

% that get financial aid: 97%

Average amount that is awarded: $18,557

Admission Rate

91%

14 Northern Michigan University


In the MSN at Northern Michigan University, students may learn primary care management. Policy and advocacy are also options. An advanced practice nurse program may be available.

Admission Requirements

Students need to apply online. There are several requirements. A current RN license is one requirement. A written description of goals is another.

Accreditation

Higher Learning Commission

Tuition & Fees

Undergrad: 18,800
Grad: 15,056

Financial Aid

% that get financial aid: 100%

Average amount that is awarded: $9,385

Admission Rate

71%

15 Minnesota State University Mankato


Consider Minnesota State University Mankato. It typically has a post nursing masters primary care FNP GC. It also offers a Nursing Practice DNP. A baccalaureate path is available.

Admission Requirements

Students may complete a grad app online. Course requirements are necessary. Students may need to obtain letters of recommendation.

Accreditation

Higher Learning Commission

Tuition & Fees

Undergrad: 18,860
Grad: 19,212

Financial Aid

% that get financial aid: 73%

Average amount that is awarded: $6,961

Admission Rate

71%

16 Alcorn State University


Alcorn State University has an MSN degree path. There are typically two options for baccalaureate prepared nurses. The Nurse Educator path is the most common. The second is an FNP program.

Admission Requirements

A formal online app is required. Applicants may need to meet testing levels. Licensing may be required.

Accreditation

Southern Association of Colleges and Schools, Commission on Colleges

Tuition & Fees

Undergrad: $8,549
Grad: $9,263

Financial Aid

% that get financial aid: 100%

Average amount that is awarded: $10,386

Admission Rate

30%

17 Clarkson College


Clarkson College typically offers two MSN programs. There is the RN to MSN and an option to get a Master of Science in Nursing.

Admission Requirements

An online app is available. A minimum 3.0 GPA as well as an Associates Degree as well as other testing is required.

Accreditation

Higher Learning Commission

Tuition & Fees

Undergrad: $15,168
Grad: $12,546

Financial Aid

% that get financial aid: 77%

Average amount that is awarded: $9,554

Admission Rate

56%

18 Seton Hall University


Seton Hall University offers several program options. This typically includes a primary care NP. It may also include an acute care NP. This school usually offers a health systems administration route. The pediatric primary care NP is also online.

Admission Requirements

Admission to the program requires an app. It also requires meeting prerequisites. These programs are somewhat limited in availability.

Accreditation

Middle States Commission on Higher Education

Tuition & Fees

Undergrad: $51,370
Grad: $36,110

Financial Aid

% that get financial aid: 100%

Average amount that is awarded: $29,443

Admission Rate

75%

19 Thomas Edison State College


The Thomas Edison State College MSN degree options are numerous. They typically include a nursing informatics plan. There is also a nursing educator and admin path. Students may need to complete 36 credits. This includes core courses.

Admission Requirements

To apply, students need to have a bachelor’s degree. It must come from an accreditted school. A GPA of 3.0 is also necessary. Other qualifications exist.

Accreditation

Middle States Commission on Higher Education

Tuition & Fees

Undergrad: 8,598
Grad: $12,150

Financial Aid

Students that get financial aid: 30%

Average amount that is awarded: $2,520

Admission Rate

N/A

20 Mercy College


The nursing education path at Mercy College is typically extensive. Nurse midwife is one field. Another is nurse anesthetist. Students may have access to advanced tech. It also has a large simulation lab.

Admission Requirements

A grad school application is necessary. This may include GPA scores and grades from previous classes. Students may need to prove they qualify for the specific grad program.

Accreditation

Middle States Commission on Higher Education

Tuition & Fees

Undergrad: $18,950
Grad: $17,238

Financial Aid

% that get financial aid: 97%

Average amount that is awarded: $14,789

Admission Rate

86%

21 East Carolina University


The Master of Science in Nursing path at East Carolina University is typically an extensive program. Students may have the opportunity to learn patient care approaches. Adult gerontology NPs are one path. Neonatal NPs, nurse midwives, and administers are other options.

Admission Requirements

Students fill out an app online. Students need to apply with credentials. This includes a license for some programs.

Accreditation

Southern Association of Colleges and Schools, Commission on Colleges

Tuition & Fees

Undergrad: 23,638
Grad: 20,807

Financial Aid

% that get financial aid: 59%

Average amount that is awarded: $9,020

Admission Rate

92%

22 Bloomsburg University of Pennsylvania


The Bloomsburg University of Pennsylvania typically offers a variety of course options. This includes nurse anesthesia, NP paths, and public health concentration. Programs may be  available for those who are CRNA, CRNP, and CNM license holders.

Admission Requirements

Students complete an online app to apply. They may need transcripts. They may also need GRE or GMAT scores for some programs.

Accreditation

Middle States Commission on Higher Education

Tuition & Fees

Undergrad: $22,782
Grad: $16,726

Financial Aid

% that get financial aid: 90%

Average amount that is awarded: $5,685

Admission Rate

84%

23 Carlow University


Carlow University typically offers a Education and Leadership MSN program. It does not require a GRE or GMAT. Students may complete it in 15 months. This is full time. Coursework covers many topics in community health. Students who wish to be practicing nursing may study part time.

Admission Requirements

An online app is available. Students typically need to verify identity. They may also have to provide transcripts and previous education info.

Accreditation

Middle States Commission on Higher Education

Tuition & Fees

Undergrad: $34,502
Grad: $22,110

Financial Aid

% that get financial aid: 100%

Average amount that is awarded: $21,732

Admission Rate

92%

24 Duquesne University


Duquesne University typically has several path options. This includes forensic nursing. Executive nursing leadership may be another. Family NP paths are available.

Admission Requirements

Students do not need a GRE to get in. This program is flexible for previous experience. Students need to provide transcripts and test scores.

Accreditation

Middle States Commission on Higher Education

Tuition & Fees

Undergrad: $47,146
Grad: $26,568

Financial Aid

% that get financial aid: 100%

Average amount that is awarded: $23,183

Admission Rate

74%

15 COLLEGES THAT DON’T REQUIRE LETTERS OF RECOMMENDATION

Looking for colleges that don’t require letters of recommendation? In fact, they do exist! There are also grad programs that don’t require letters of recommendation.

Find an Online Degree Program

WHY DON’T SOME COLLEGES ASK FOR OR REQUIRE LETTERS OF RECOMMENDATION?

Certain universities do not necessitate letters of recommendation, opting for alternative methods to gauge a student’s potential. For adult learners, the significance of life experiences may surpass the need for traditional recommendations. In essence, this implies that you can embark on your journey towards an undergraduate degree without the prerequisite of recommendation letters.

Do all graduate schools require letters of recommendation?

No, not every graduate schools mandates letters of recommendation. In fact, all the institutions listed here provide graduate programs! In a nutshell, the typical prerequisites for grad school frequently encompass:

  • Bachelor’s degree from an accredited school
  • GRE or GMAT (many schools do waive this)
  • Official transcripts
  • Writing samples or personal statement
  • Resume
  • Apply eligible work experience and prior college credits toward up to 75% of your undergraduate degree.
  • Experience a Purdue Global undergraduate program for an introductory 3-week period. There’s no financial obligation beyond the application fee
  • Competency-based ExcelTrack™ programs may allow you to earn your degree faster and for less money

Purdue Global University

HOW TO GET LETTERS OF RECOMMENDATION FOR COLLEGE APPLICATION

Obtaining letters of recommendation for your college application might appear challenging, especially if you’ve been away from the academic setting for some time. However, the good news is that you can still secure outstanding recommendations from a variety of sources. Don’t hesitate to reach out, as most individuals are inclined to offer assistance. Regardless of who you approach, there are several key steps to follow.

First and foremost, be sure to ask politely. Additionally, provide them with ample time to craft a thoughtful recommendation. It’s essential to ensure they are aware of the specific requirements of the institution you’re applying to. Lastly, make sure to communicate your educational objectives to them. This enables them to emphasize your most impressive qualities effectively. Keeping these considerations in mind, consult our list of potential recommenders for your reference letter.

1. YOUR EMPLOYER

When considering adult learners, the manner in which you approach your work carries significant weight. In this regard, your supervisor or team leader holds the potential to elaborate on your work ethic and adeptness at problem-solving. Moreover, they can shed light on your collaborative skills and how effectively you engage with colleagues. Should your current occupation align with the academic path you aspire to pursue, that’s an added advantage.

However, there’s no need for concern if your current job lies in a different field. These attributes reflect your personal character rather than being tied to a specific role. The diligence you exhibit holds considerable importance, as educational institutions assess the performance of adult learners and place less emphasis on standardized tests.

2. YOUR COACH

Why consider involving your coach? While college admissions boards may not be deeply concerned about your championship victories, they do value the qualities that emerge around them. Were you consistently inspiring and motivating your team? Did you invest extra hours analyzing game strategies? These actions underscore your dedication and can be woven into your narrative to showcase your potential in an academic setting.

If your high school grades weren’t the sole focus, engaging in a conversation with a coach about your present college readiness could be beneficial. Their insights could effectively convey this aspect to an admissions counselor. Essentially, a coach can effectively spotlight your work ethic and highlight your ability to function within a team dynamic.

Southern New Hampshire University

  • Multiple term start dates throughout the year. 24/7 online classroom access.
  • Popular Online Programs include Business Administration, Psychology, Information Technology, Human Services…

3. YOUR PROFESSOR

Engaging in a few college courses prior to embarking on a full-time program? If so, channel your efforts into excelling academically and forging connections with your instructors. Undoubtedly, a recommendation letter from a professor within your field of study can wield significant influence. This is particularly impactful when the letter attests to your unwavering commitment within the classroom setting. It’s worth noting that, as an adult, your academic performance carries weight.

In this case, a peer-to-peer dynamic can come into play, provided you’re demonstrating commendable performance. Keeping this in view, directing your attention towards coursework holds paramount importance. Equally crucial is cultivating a rapport with your professor. To sum it up, enrolling in classes ahead of a comprehensive program serves a dual purpose: showcasing your work approach and securing a commendable recommendation from an esteemed educator.

DOES COMMON APP ASK FOR LETTERS OF RECOMMENDATION?

Applying to college is stressful enough without managing all the different forms and deadlines. The Common App by all means makes this easier. And more than 800 schools accept it.

In short, the Common App itself does not require letters of recommendation. But, their Requirements Grid will let you know if any individual schools do. In that case, you can pick and choose where to apply.

15 COLLEGES THAT DON’T REQUIRE LETTERS OF RECOMMENDATION

Colleges wanting a letter of recommendation from former teachers is quite common. But they’re not universal. Especially at schools that cater to non traditional students. In summary, life and work experience can matter more. So check out our list of colleges that don’t require letters of recommendation.

1

Adams State University

ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS: HIGH SCHOOL GPA, CLASS RANK, TRANSCRIPTS, ADMISSION TEST SCORES (SAT/ACT)

School Features:

  • Online programs
  • HLC accredited
  • Majors include business, liberal arts and education

ABOUT ADAMS:

Adams State is a 4 year public university with both on campus and online programs. Located in Alamosa, Colorado it serves over 3,000 students with programs at all levels. Associate’s through doctorate.

2

Arizona State University

ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS: HIGH SCHOOL TRANSCRIPTS, ADMISSION TEST SCORES (SAT/ACT) TOEFL

School Features:

  • Online programs
  • HLC accredited
  • Majors include international business, nutrition, journalism, registered nursing

ABOUT ASU:

ASU is a 4 year public university with campuses throughout the state and online programs as well. The school serves over 11,000 students and offers bachelor’s degree programs through to doctorate.

3

Colorado State University Global Campus

ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS: High school GPA, transcripts, TOEFL

School Features:

  • Online learning only
  • HLC accredited
  • Majors include business, human resources, marketing, IT, health care administration

ABOUT CSU GLOBAL:

CSU Global is a 4 year public university. The school now serves over 12,000 students. They offer bachelor’s and master’s degree programs and certificates. All in a fully online format. 

4

CUNY New York City College of Technology

ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS: High school GPA, transcripts, TOEFL

School Features:

  • Accredited nursing / dental hygiene programs
  • MSCHE accredited
  • Majors include architectural tech, hospitality, information science, engineering 

ABOUT CITY TECH:

City Tech is a 4 year public university. It serves over 17,000 students, all at the undergrad levels. They have over 30 majors to choose from and an Honors Scholars Program.

6

Delaware State University

ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS: HIGH SCHOOL GPA, TRANSCRIPTS, OTHER TESTS (E.G. WONDERLIC)

School Features:

  • Online programs
  • SACSCOC accredited
  • Majors include biology, business, mass communication, education, public health

ABOUT DSU:

Located in Dover, DSU is a 4 year public university that serves over 4,700 students. They offer degrees at all levels. From bachelor’s through doctorate. 

7

ECPI University

ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS: HIGH SCHOOL TRANSCRIPTS SUGGESTED, ADMISSION TEST SCORES (SAT/ACT)

School Features:

  • Online programs
  • MSCHE accredited
  • Majors include accounting, business, information assurance, computer systems

ABOUT ECPI UNIVERSITY:

ECPI is a 4 year private for profit university with an HQ in Virginia. Apart from other campuses, they offer online programs through master’s level and serve over 13,000 students.

8

Florida State University

ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS: HIGH SCHOOL TRANSCRIPTS, GPA, COMPLETION OF COLLEGE PREPARATORY PROGRAM, ADMISSION TEST SCORES (SAT/ACT) TOEFL

School Features:

  • Online programs
  • SACSCOC accredited
  • Majors include regional planning, business management, biology, finance, IT

ABOUT FLORIDA STATE:

FSU is a 4 year public university located in Tallahassee that serves over 42,000 students. They offer a range of degrees from associate through doctorate.

9

Grand Canyon University

ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS: HIGH SCHOOL TRANSCRIPTS, GPA, TOEFL

School Features:

  • Online programs
  • HLC accredited
  • Majors include biology, business administration, finance, education, registered nursing

ABOUT GCU:

GCU is a 4 year private for profit university in Arizona. The school also offers evening, hybrid and online learning. And, degree programs from bachelor’s to doctorate taught through a Christian lens.

10

Indiana University

ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS: HIGH SCHOOL TRANSCRIPTS, COMPLETION OF COLLEGE PREPARATORY PROGRAM, ADMISSION TEST SCORES (SAT/ACT) TOEFL

School Features:

  • Online programs
  • HLC accredited
  • Majors include biology, business administration, finance, education, registered nursing

ABOUT INDIANA U:

Indiana U is a 4 year public university. The school serves over 43,000 students with both on campus and online programs. These are available from the associate level to doctorate.

11

Our Lady of the Lake University

ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS: HIGH SCHOOL TRANSCRIPTS, GPA, ADMISSION TEST SCORES (SAT/ACT), TOEFL

School Features:

  • Online programs
  • SACSCOC accredited
  • Majors include business, PR, IT, counselor education, health care administration

ABOUT OLLU:

OLLU is one of Texas’ 4 year private not for profit universities. The school offers bachelor’s, master’s and doctorate programs and has a student body of almost 3,000. Some of their offerings are available in the evenings and online. 

12

Pennsylvania State University

ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS: HIGH SCHOOL TRANSCRIPTS, GPA, ADMISSION TEST SCORES (SAT/ACT), TOEFL

School Features:

  • Online programs
  • MSCHE accredited
  • Majors include agricultural, business, biology, communication, computer sciences

ABOUT PSU:

PSU is a 4 year public university. The school has several campuses including its online wing, Penn State Global. Serving over 90,000 students, there are programs from associate to doctorate. 

13

Purdue University Global

ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS: OPEN ADMISSIONS POLICY

School Features:

  • Online programs
  • HLC accredited
  • Majors include accounting, business, IT, health professions, criminal justice 

ABOUT PURDUE:

Purdue is a 4 year public university located in Indiana. They serve over 38,000 students with programs from associate through doctorate. Many of these are fully online.

14

Rutgers University

ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS: HIGH SCHOOL TRANSCRIPTS, GPA, COMPLETION OF COLLEGE PREPARATORY PROGRAM, ADMISSION TEST SCORES (SAT/ACT)

School Features:

  • Online programs
  • MSCHE accredited
  • Majors include accounting, biology, business administration, IT, criminal justice  

ABOUT RUTGERS:

Rutgers is a 4 year public university with several campuses in New Jersey. They serve close to 14,000 students with programs from bachelor’s to doctorate.

15

San Francisco State University

ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS: HIGH SCHOOL TRANSCRIPTS, GPA, COMPLETION OF COLLEGE PREPARATORY PROGRAM, ADMISSION TEST SCORES (SAT/ACT)

School Features:

  • Online courses / certificates
  • WAC accredited
  • Majors include biology, communication, education, computer science, engineering, allied heath 

ABOUT SF STATE:

SF State is a 4 year public university that serves close to 30,000. The school offers programs from bachelor’s to doctorate. The College of Extended Learning at SFSU also offers online courses and certificate programs.

Looking for other options? Discover colleges with high acceptance rates and colleges with rolling admissions.

Vet Techs vs Vet Assistants

What Is the Difference Between a Vet Tech vs a Vet Assistant?

Vet techs and vet assistants may share some responsibilities and work closely with animals and veterinarians, their roles and earning potential differ. It is common for outsiders to assume these positions are similar, but in reality, they entail distinct responsibilities.  

Vet techs typically possess more extensive education and enjoy a wider range of professional opportunities. They may work alongside doctors in various settings such as research institutions, clinics, kennels, animal hospitals, and even with pets, livestock, zoo animals, lab animals, and military animals. On the other hand, vet assistants are often primarily engaged in administrative tasks within local clinics. However, as they accumulate professional experience, assistants may gradually assume additional responsibilities

Vet Techs vs Vet Assistants

Comparing Vet Techs vs Vet Assistants

Here’s a quick breakdown of the two positions in the fields below. Please note that the median pay is based on the national average.

Job TitleJob DescriptionEducation Requirements2023 Median Annual Pay Number  of Jobs in 2022
Vet Techvet tech may perform a variety of medical tests to diagnose and treat animals. They may also provide general animal care.Associate’s degree$43,740 /year122,900
Vet Assistantvet assistant may help vets, scientists, and other veterinary medicine professionals complete a variety of tasks related to the care of animals.High school degree (or equivalent)$36,440 /year114,800

Role of Vet Techs vs Vet Assistants

Knowing the roles of vet techs vs. vet assistants may make it easier to decide which one is the perfect path for you. As you read through the expectations, keep in mind how you would respond to each task.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UaDbCOfvgOM

Vet Assistant Duties

A vet assistant may pursue work directly out of high school. Families with cats, farmers with goats, and lab workers with rats will fuel the profession for years to come. Those who attended a program may have a head start, but much of what is learned is often through hands on experience. This is why it’s so important for assistants to dive into a new position.

Each veterinarian may have their own comfort level when it comes to how much they need their assistant to do.

But for the most part, assistants may be asked to perform the following tasks:

  • Provide basic care: This may mean feeding, grooming, bathing, or exercising the animals.
  • Safety checks: A vet assistant may need to keep things safe and clean for the animals, clients, and staff. This may include disinfecting the waiting room or washing surgical instruments.
  • Prep work: The assistant may prepare the room for a variety of medical procedures. They’re also expected to properly store everything away after the vet has finished.
  • Restraint: Assistants may have to restrain difficult or unruly animals. They may need to remain calm and professional under these stressful situations.
  • Admin work: Vet assistants may fill out intake paperwork and file document. They also may set appointments for clients.

Every clinic or hospital may have its own strengths and limitations. They may have to feel comfortable with the physical and emotional demands of a job. Working with unpredictable pets and animals involves plenty of pressure.

In short, this amounts to vet assistants being willing to fill in wherever they may be needed. On one day, they may be  asked to assist a vet when taking blood samples. On the next, they may spend the majority of their time setting up and dismantling surgical rooms. As a vet witnesses an assistant’s commitment to the job, the assistant stands a better chance of moving up.

Vet Tech Duties

Many of the vet tech duties may mirror those of the vet assistant. The duties of each vet tech may vary from one practice to the next.

It may be some combination of the following:

  • Restraint: Vet techs may need to prevent animals from hurting themselves. They may also need to look out for the safety of other people during exams and procedures.
  • Take X-rays: The technician may operate standard X-ray equipment. They may produce clear and readable images for the veterinarian to diagnose their patients.
  • Perform lab tests: Vet techs may run analyses in the lab. They should feel comfortable working with bodily samples taken for testing (e.g., blood, stool, etc.).
  • Monitoring: Hospitalized animals may need consistent monitoring. This way, vets understand how they’re responding to treatment. This means checking vitals, changing bandages, and alerting staff to major changes.
  • Prep work: Vet tech may need to get animals ready for procedures and set up surgical and exam rooms. They should anticipate common problems and work to prevent them whenever possible.
  • Anesthesia: The vet tech may administer anesthesia to animals during surgery. They may also need to track the animal’s response to the drugs.
  • Emergency aid: Technicians may perform emergency first aid to animals. This usually occurs when the veterinarian is unavailable. They may also be asked to come to the vet’s aid when needed.

Vet techs are generally given more job responsibilities. They may need to know how tests are performed and what equipment is needed for each procedure. They should be comfortable working in a lab setting and be able to run tests and analyze results. Also, they may supervise vet assistants and assign tasks. Time management skills may be important for vet techs.

Educational Requirements of Vet Techs vs Vet Assistants

This is by far the most important distinction between the two. A vet assistant may perform some of the same tasks as a vet tech. But the vet tech may have received higher education. A vet assistant might be hired without any kind of formal degree or accreditation. You should know that there are programs for vet assistants though. This may help an assistant become more qualified for a position.

Vet Assistant Education Requirements

Becoming a vet assistant may only require a GED or high school diploma, although enrolling in an Approved Veterinary Assistant Program can offer a competitive advantage. This program provides instruction on specialized tasks expected of vet assistants and often includes a requirement to pass an approved credentialing exam. The exam serves not only as an assessment of acquired knowledge but also as evidence of dedication and willingness to go the extra mile in pursuing a career in the field. 

The National Association of Veterinary Technicians in America (NAVTA) established the Approved Veterinary Assistant designation as a means of recognizing the valuable contributions of assistants to animal health in their communities. This esteemed training program by NAVTA is widely recognized and respected throughout the United States. 

Vet Technician Education Requirements

While veterinary technologists may require a bachelor’s degree, becoming a vet technician may not necessitate the same level of education. However, completion of an accredited program is typically mandatory. The coursework must receive approval from the American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA). Vet techs usually pursue an associate’s degree, which can be obtained through a community college and typically takes between two to four years. In contrast, vet assistants typically aim for a certificate or program diploma. 

The specific registration requirements may vary depending on the state. Some vet techs may be required to attend school, while not all may need to take and pass the Veterinary Technician National Exam (VTNE). It is crucial to verify the requirements set by your state when seeking certification. Adhering to the guidelines established by the appropriate board or agency will ensure that you possess all the necessary qualifications for application. Licensing or certification may be necessary in some cases, while registration may suffice in others. 

Costs of a Vet Assistant Program

As mentioned, a vet assistant may be hired with nothing more than a high school diploma. For this reason, the cost of a vet assistant program is relatively reasonable. This is especially true if you may be getting through an online platform. The number of hours you may need to complete the course may be as low as 100 and as high as 240. Working online may give you the chance to make your own schedule too. This perk may come in handy for those with demanding responsibilities.

Costs of a Vet Technician Degree Program

A vet technician may need the proper education to earn their degree in the field. But the actual costs may vary widely, depending on the program a person selects. Shopping around and checking the reputation of each curriculum may go a long way. Check with different veterinarians in the area about which schools may get preferential treatment. This may help you decide if the costs of the degree are worth the rewards.

Is There an Alternative Route I Could Take to Become a Vet Tech?

It depends on the state that you’re hoping to work in. Alaska, California, and Wisconsin may allow you to sit for the Veterinary Technician National Examination. This may be without having completed the designated coursework required in 47 other states. The vet tech must may need to meet a number of requirements to qualify though. You must provide proof by way of documentation of the veterinarians that you’ve worked with. You’ll also need to show that you have 20 hours worth of class work. This may be obtained through a state approved program.

Salary

The Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) conducts a comparative analysis of the job outlook for vet techs and vet assistants, juxtaposing them with various other career paths. This assessment aims to provide insights into the post-graduation prospects and career prospects awaiting individuals. 

The positive news is that both fields are projected to experience nearly identical growth rates until 2032. With a 20%-21% increase, the demand for these roles is rising at a significantly faster pace than many other career options. Job stability holds great importance for prospective applicants, and investing in either position can instill confidence in individuals. 

This upward trend in demand is often reflected in the higher earning potential of vet techs. In 2023, their median annual salary was approximately $4,000 higher than that of vet assistants. With a median annual salary of $43,740 compared to $36,440 , the value of pursuing further education becomes evident. The increased salary can make it more manageable to repay educational expenses. 

Job Outlook

Regardless of the path chosen though, both professions may have opportunities. Assistants might become certified in operating equipment and veterinary technology. Vet techs may take more classes in any given specialty (e.g., surgical procedures, nutrition, etc). Vet assistants may begin right out of high school before deciding that they want to advance to a vet tech. A vet techs might choose to go onto to be a vet.

As you can see the vet assistant and vet tech may share duties. But the veterinary career positions are different. You should choose between the two based on how much you want to make and how much you’re willing to invest in a vet tech program or the veterinary field. While a vet tech may spend more, they’ll also make more. Or you may choose to start as a part-time assistant at a veterinary hospital or veterinary practice and receive as much on-the-job training as possible. Check your state’s requirements to find out more about what you may expect.

Colleges with Rolling Admissions

The application process for students has typically been a long source of dread for many. Most of the time, it’s not one college that you’re applying to. Many students  typically apply to several schools. This is true whether you’re trying for the Ivy League, national universities, or state universities. This is why colleges with rolling admissions could be a lifesaver. Applying to colleges with rolling admissions may make your life a little more streamlined. It may reduce the stress of making specific deadlines. See how college admissions work in the United States. We could also tell you more about how to use the policies to your advantage. 

What Are Rolling Admissions?

The term rolling admissions refers to colleges that process applications as they arrive until slots are filled. Colleges with non rolling admissions wait until an application deadline before processing. Many schools have adopted this policy.

What is the Best Time to Apply in Rolling Admissions?

The best time to apply to colleges with rolling admissions may be as soon as you can. If you’re planning on early action, you may  want to get your application in as soon as the school may take it. Each school may have its own college application process. Some may begin accepting as early as mid summer. Check the acceptance rate of your  choices and make sure you have a safety school in mind (or two).

Advantages and Disadvantages of Rolling Admissions

There are typically pros and cons to colleges with rolling admissions. We’ll look at how the process works before you make your decision.

Pros

More Control

One advantage of colleges with rolling admissions may be that it puts you in the driver seat. Some people may hear back from a college within four weeks of applying. In other words, they may not have to wait until after the application deadline has passed.

Competition

There are two sides of the coin with competition. Let’s say you apply to Creighton University or Iowa State University. You may get the benefit of fresh eyes on your stats. It could give you the edge here if you apply on the early side. An admission official may be comparing your application to just a few other students. Without rolling admissions, they might be comparing you to thousands.

Competition advantage could also come late in the game though. Let’s say a school like Clemson University has an unexpected opening. You may still apply long after every other school’s deadline has passed.

Less Stress

Applying for colleges could be s a stressful time, one that isn’t made easier by looming deadlines. If your  perfect pick accepts you immediately, you  may relax and focus on making your senior year the best one ever.

DID YOU KNOW?
May 1 is sometimes referred to as National College Decision Day, because it’s the traditional deadline for deciding which school to enroll in.

Cons

Locks You In

Some students may end up making a decision too quickly with rolling admissions. They may end up jumping on the first opportunity without considering other options.

Changing Benchmarks

The more time goes by, the more students may apply. With rolling admissions, getting your application in at the peak isn’t typically recommended. Officials may be more overwhelmed and less likely to consider outside factors.

Applications Cutoffs

It’s easy to think you have all the time in the world with rolling admissions. But each school may have its own policy, and the terms may also include deadlines. As a student, you may have to do your research. Otherwise, you could end up applying to a school too late in the game.

You should also consider changing policy. The University of Illinois used to have rolling admissions. But they changed this when too many students deferred.

Rolling Deadline vs Rolling Notification

Rolling deadlines typically refers to school without a hard cutoff date. But, rolling notification refers to how the school may inform students of their acceptance. This does not mean that there are no official timelines though. For example, if you apply early action at Pacific University, you typically have up to January 15 to submit. Rolling admissions usually begin after that date.

Early Access vs Rolling Admission

Early access is typically considered a commitment to the school. Rolling admissions is not. It’s a way to respond to students faster. Let’s say you apply early access to Indiana University and get in. You’ve essentially told the school that you could  be there in the fall. If you apply rolling admission to Michigan State University, you may or may not attend.

25 COLLEGES WITH ROLLING ADMISSIONS POLICIES

1 Ashford University


Ashford is an accredited, online university. It focuses on bringing technology to higher education. Access course material from your smartphone, tablet, or laptop and earn a degree while balancing other commitments.

Admission Requirements

  • Interview with an Enrollment Services Advisor
  • Transcripts
  • School and work history

Application Deadline

Accepts applications year-round

Tuition & Fees

Undergrad: $13,160
Grad: $13,515

Financial Aid

% that get financial aid: 100%

Average amount that is awarded: $5,121

Acceptance Rate

21%

Accreditation

WASC Senior College and University Commission

2 Colorado Christian University


Founded in 1914, Colorado Christian University offers more than 100 degree programs. The staff caters to traditional and adult students. Its curriculum and courses focus on scientific research, technology, and innovation.

Admission Requirements

  • 2.8 high school GPA
  • 1060 SAT score (or 21 ACT score)
  • Strong spiritual recommendation
  • Admissions essay

Application Deadline

Priority deadline is April 1. Rolling admission accepted until all slots are filled.

Tuition & Fees

Undergrad: $39,266
Grad: $16,733

Financial Aid

% that get financial aid: 100%

Average amount that is awarded: $25,200

Acceptance Rate

31%

Accreditation

The Higher Learning Commission

3 Purdue University Global


Purdue University Global is designed for adult students who need flexibility. Their innovative approach to teaching is based on personalization. Educators have developed a modern curriculum to teach the most important skills in a modern world.

Admission Requirements

  • High school diploma (or equivalent)
  • Official transcripts
  • May require an interview

Application Deadline

Applications accepted year round

Tuition & Fees

Undergrad: 14,421
Grad: 11,582

Financial Aid

% that get financial aid: 50%

Average amount that is awarded: $8,815

Acceptance Rate

100%

Accreditation

The Higher Learning Commission

4 Grand Canyon University


For more than 65 years Grand Canyon University has been committed to a Christian worldview. The goal is to inspire unity across the university. But the school also accepts students with diverse interests, experiences, and perspectives. (This is true regardless of religious background.

Admission Requirements

  • Official transcripts
  • Complete all forms (including FAFSA)
  • Work with Admissions Counselor

Application Deadline

Applications accepted year round

Tuition & Fees

Undergrad: $17,450
Grad: $11,124

Financial Aid

% that get financial aid: 99%

Average amount that is awarded: $9,662

Acceptance Rate

73%

Accreditation

The Higher Learning Commission

5 Grantham University


Grantham University serves the non-traditional student with a philosophy centered on quality distance learning. This online university works with a highly diverse student population. The university values how education may enhance one’s life. It may be a particularly smart choice during COVID.

Admission Requirements

  • Proof of high school graduation
  • SAT score of 880 (or ACT score of 18)
  • Recommendation from high school guidance counselor
  • Funding in place within a week of start date

Application Deadline

Applications accepted year-round

Tuition & Fees

Undergrad: $8,280
Grad: $4,800

Financial Aid

% that get financial aid: 96%

Average amount that is awarded: $5,765

Acceptance Rate

20%

Accreditation

The Distance Education Accrediting Commission (DEAC)

6 Full Sail University


Full Sail University offers more than 90 programs. It typically serves more than 15,000 students. The university provides students with a creative approach to education. Classes are immersive, fast-paced, and relevant. Education mirrors the workflow and collaboration found in today’s business environment.

Admission Requirements

  • Completed application
  • High school diploma or equivalent
  • Government-issued photo identification
  • Verification of English proficiency (if primary language)
  • Interview with Admissions Representative

Application Deadline

Applications accepted year-round. Full Sail University recommends applying at least 3 months before start date.

Tuition & Fees

Undergrad: $26,417
Grad: $19,401

Financial Aid

% that get financial aid: 74%

Average amount that is awarded: $8,531

Acceptance Rate

39%

Accreditation

Accrediting Commission of Career Schools and Colleges (ACCSC)

7 Creighton University


Creighton University is a Jesuit school where students typically grow as a family. It’s a supportive community that encourages everyone to be of service. The school emphasizes learning by doing. From internships to personal projects, leaders believe practice makes perfect.

Admission Requirements

  • At least 16 units of required high school courses

Application Deadline

Early decision applications are due by Nov 1. Applications are processed on an ongoing basis after this date

Tuition & Fees

Undergrad: $47,000
Grad: $19,676

Financial Aid

% that get financial aid: 100%

Average amount that is awarded: $26,918

Acceptance Rate

72%

Accreditation

The Higher Learning Commission

8 Penn State


Penn State was originally founded in 1855. Sometimes called a public Ivy League school, it has a solid reputation for educating its students. Pennsylvania State University college is all about broadening its students horizons. It’s also a good place to make lifelong connections and begin your true career path.

Admission Requirements

  • Depends on program
  • No minimum SAT score required

Application Deadline

Modified rolling admission. Early action applications due Nov 15, recommended for all students to have applications in by Dec 1

Tuition & Fees

Undergrad: In-state $19,835;Out-of-state $38,651
Grad: In-state 25,015;Out-of-state 42,151

Financial Aid

% that get financial aid: 44%

Average amount that is awarded: $10,066

Acceptance Rate

70%

Accreditation

Middle States Commission on Higher Education

9 New Jersey Institute of Technology


The New Jersey Institute of Technology (NJIT) is a lead polytechnic university. The staff’s mission is to prepare students to succeed in a tech-driven economy. This school emphasizes the value of leadership.

Admission Requirements

  • Personal essay
  • Letters of recommendation
  • SAT/ACT scores
  • Top 25% of class

Application Deadline

Early Action I by Nov 15. Early Action II by Dec 15. Rolling admissions until Mar 1.

Tuition & Fees

Undergrad: 35,934
Grad: $36,702

Financial Aid

% that get financial aid: 89%

Average amount that is awarded: $15,959

Acceptance Rate

81%

Accreditation

Middle States Commission on Higher Education

10 Arizona State University


Arizona State University is a well-funded institution with dozens of elite programs and a highly respected faculty. The school values innovation above all else.

Admission Requirements

  • Personal essay
  • Letters of recommendation
  • SAT/ACT scores submissions
  • Top 25% of class

Application Deadline

Fall admission opens on July 1. Early Action I by Nov 1. Rolling admissions after Nov 1

Tuition & Fees

Undergrad: In-state $11,618;Out-of-state $30,592
Grad: In-state $12,914;Out-of-state $25,398

Financial Aid

% that get financial aid: 89%

Average amount that is awarded: $12,381

Acceptance Rate

68%

Accreditation

The Higher Learning Commission

11 Michigan State University


Michigan State University was founded more than 150 years ago. Its goal has always been to push its students to do more in the world. The school has broken boundaries with its research across several industries.

Admission Requirements

  • Class rank
  • Quality of academic curriculum
  • Standardized test scores
  • Leadership experience

(There are no minimum requirements.)

Application Deadline

Early decision Nov 1. Regular decision Feb 1. Rolling admissions after Feb 1.

Tuition & Fees

Undergrad: $43,372
Grad: $41,224

Financial Aid

% that get financial aid: 92%

Average amount that is awarded: $8,684

Acceptance Rate

82%

Accreditation

The Higher Learning Commission

12 Indiana University


Indiana University was built as a tribute to the great minds of the past. The school is typically known for providing students with a number of extra-curricular opportunities.

Admission Requirements

  • High school graduated
  • At least 34 credits of college prep courses

Application Deadline

Early decision Nov 1. Rolling admissions after Nov 1

Tuition & Fees

Undergrad: $21,734
Grad: $16,210

Financial Aid

% that get financial aid: 74%

Average amount that is awarded: $10,336

Acceptance Rate

45%

Accreditation

The Higher Learning Commission

13 University of Pittsburgh


Founded in 1787, the University of Pittsburgh is a distinguished institution. It features a 132-acre campus in the Oakland neighborhood. Its research has contributed to numerous advancements in America.

Admission Requirements

  • 3.5 minimum cumulative GPA
  • Minimum SAT Score: 1130 or Minimum ACT Score: 23

Application Deadline

Rolling admissions all-year round

Tuition & Fees

Undergrad: $37,320
Grad: $42,324

Financial Aid

% that get financial aid: 85%

Average amount that is awarded: $10,919

Acceptance Rate

81%

Accreditation

Middle States Commission on Higher Education

14 Loyola University of Chicago


Loyola University Chicago has an excellent reputation for online programs. This Jesuit school has 80 undergraduate programs, 140 graduate programs, and six campuses across the city.

Admission Requirements

  • Free online application
  • Official high school transcript
  • Letter of recommendation from a counselor or teacher
  • Standardized test option starting 2021

Application Deadline

Rolling admissions until space is filled

Tuition & Fees

Undergrad: $49,498
Grad: $20,344

Financial Aid

% that get financial aid: 99%

Average amount that is awarded: $26,796

Acceptance Rate

73%

Accreditation

The Higher Learning Commission

15 University at Buffalo


The University at Buffalo ranks first for public universities in New York. Along with excellent academic standards, there are more than 600 organizations and clubs to join.

Admission Requirements

  • Class rank
  • Quality of academic curriculum
  • Extra-curriculum activities

Application Deadline

Early decision by Nov 1. Regular decision by Feb 1. Rolling admissions until capacity is reached

Tuition & Fees

Undergrad: $30,572
Grad: $27,338

Financial Aid

% that get financial aid: 84%

Average amount that is awarded: $8,859

Acceptance Rate

72%

Accreditation

Middle States Commission on Higher Education

16 University of Minnesota – Twin Cities


University of Minnesota—Twin Cities boasts more than 4,000 faculty members. The award-winning professors are constantly challenging students. The goal is to teach life skills that may serve students their whole lives.

Admission Requirements

  • Academic record

Application Deadline

Accepts applications on a rolling basis until Aug 1

Tuition & Fees

Undergrad: $36,402
Grad: $31,555

Financial Aid

% that get financial aid: 63%

Average amount that is awarded: $11,388

Acceptance Rate

81%

Accreditation

The Higher Learning Commission

17 Clemson University


Clemson University got its start in 1889. It is a land-grant school with a good balance between students and faculty. Located near the Blue Ridge Mountains and Lake Hartwell. There are seven colleges at the university.

Admission Requirements

  • College prep course work
  • Strong extra-curriculars

Application Deadline

Priority deadline by Dec 1. Rolling applications until May 1

Tuition & Fees

Undergrad: $39,498
Grad: $24,798

Financial Aid

% that get financial aid: 79%

Average amount that is awarded: $10,430

Acceptance Rate

83%

Accreditation

Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges (SACSCOC)

18 City University of New York


The City University of New York (CUNY) is known for balancing cost with quality. There are numerous programs to join here. The college dates back to 1847. It’s the largest city educational system in the country.

Admission Requirements

  • Depends on college attended

Application Deadline

Priority deadline by Feb 1. Rolling applications from mid-Feb to Jul 1

Tuition & Fees

Undergrad: $69,045
Grad: $23,160

Financial Aid

% that get financial aid: 77%

Average amount that is awarded: $9,657

Acceptance Rate

38%

Accreditation

Middle States Commission on Higher Education (MSCHE or Middle States)

19 Arkansas State University


Arkansas State University (ASU) was founded in 1909. It is the second largest university in the state. There are more than 150 study programs for students to choose. ASU is also an economic and cultural institution in the South.

Admission Requirements

  • High school transcripts
  • English proficiency
  • 2.75 minimum GPA

Application Deadline

Applications accepted until capacity is reached

Tuition & Fees

Undergrad: $13,826
Grad: $12,416

Financial Aid

% that get financial aid: 100%

Average amount that is awarded: $11,225

Acceptance Rate

53%

Accreditation

The Higher Learning Commission

20 University of New Hampshire


The University of New Hampshire boasts an award-winning staff and excellent facilities. With Boston nearby, the school has plenty of resources for students.

Admission Requirements

  • Letters of recommendation
  • High school transcripts
  • ACT/SAT scores (optional)

Application Deadline

Early decision by Nov 15. Regular decision by Feb 1. Honors program is rolling admissions until capacity is reached

Tuition & Fees

Undergrad: $38,882
Grad: $30,138

Financial Aid

% that get financial aid: 96%

Average amount that is awarded: $13,573

Acceptance Rate

77%

Accreditation

The Commission of Higher Education

21 Saint Louis University


Established in 1818, Saint Louis University is a Catholic school with excellent academics. With a Jesuit mission at its core, the university is one of the top-rated research institutions (according to U.S. News and World Report).

Admission Requirements

There are no set minimums. ACT/SAT scores are optional. Students must submit transcripts.

Application Deadline

Acc